extra vs spare what difference

what is difference between extra and spare

English

Etymology

Abbreviation of extraordinary.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɛkstɹə/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧tra

Adjective

extra (not comparable)

  1. Beyond what is due, usual, expected, or necessary; extraneous; additional; supernumerary.
  2. (dated) Extraordinarily good; superior.
  3. (slang) Over the top; going beyond what is normal or appropriate, often in a dramatic manner.
    • 2017, Yael Livnch, “Whole Foods”, in “Get The Inside Soup: Staffers Review Local Soup Stops”, 3 February 2017, page 23:
      I highly recommend getting some more bread on the side—they offer small loaves and soup crackers for free, but I’m so extra, I bought my own loaf.
    • 2017, Claire Craig, “#Instabeauty”, Northern Woman, November 2017, page 48:
      Shattered glass, pierced, bejewelled, chromed and glittered – nails are going totally extra on Insta at the minute and we approve.
    • 2019, Michelle Spottswood, quoted in Kirby Myers, “Does Christmas in your house start before or after Thanksgiving”, Key West Weekly, 21 November 2019, page 7:
      Two months of Christmas trees, Christmas movies and Christmas music brings so much fun to our home, we are so extra with it!
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:extra.

Derived terms

  • extraness

Translations

Adverb

extra (not comparable)

  1. (informal) To an extraordinary degree.

Translations

Noun

extra (plural extras)

  1. Something additional, such as an item above and beyond the ordinary school curriculum, or added to the usual charge on a bill.
    Synonyms: addition, supplement
  2. An extra edition of a newspaper, which is printed outside of the normal printing cycle.
  3. (cricket) A run scored without the ball having hit the striker’s bat – a wide, bye, leg bye or no ball.
    Synonym: sundry
  4. (acting) A supernumerary or walk-on in a film or play.
  5. Something of an extra quality or grade. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms

  • (something additional): See also Thesaurus:adjunct

Derived terms

  • wuxtry

Translations

Derived terms

  • extra credit
  • Romsey Extra
  • sextra

Anagrams

  • Artex, retax, taxer

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin extra, influenced by French and Middle French extraordinaire.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛks.traː/
  • Hyphenation: extra

Adverb

extra

  1. extra

Adjective

extra (not comparable)

  1. extra
  2. (Limburg) on purpose

Inflection

Descendants

  • Indonesian: ekstra

Noun

extra m (plural extra’s, diminutive extraatje n)

  1. something extra, something in addition

See also

  • expres

French

Adjective

extra (plural extras)

  1. extra, additional
  2. great, super, famous

Noun

extra m or f (plural extras)

  1. extra, supplement

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛks.tʁa/

Adjective

extra (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of extra- (extra, special, additional)

Usage notes

  • In formal standard German, extra- is a prefix attached to the following noun. In colloquial German, however, it is often treated like a real adjective. The substantival (or partitive) form used with indefinite pronouns may also take -s: was Extras (“something additional, something on top”).

Adverb

extra

  1. specifically (for a given purpose)
    Synonym: eigens
  2. (colloquial) on purpose
    Synonyms: absichtlich, mit Absicht
  3. (colloquial) aside, apart, separately
    Synonyms: einzeln, getrennt, separat
  4. (colloquial) particularly, very
    Synonyms: besonders, sehr

Usage notes

  • In the sense of “specifically”, extra has entered the standard language and is now frequently seen in writing. The other senses remain colloquial.

Hungarian

Etymology

From German extra, from Latin extra.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛkstrɒ]
  • Hyphenation: ext‧ra
  • Rhymes: -rɒ

Adjective

extra (comparative extrább, superlative legextrább)

  1. extra (beyond what is due, usual, expected, or necessary; extraneous; additional)

Declension

Noun

extra (plural extrák)

  1. luxury features (e.g. in vehicles)

Declension

References


Ido

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ekstra/, /eɡztra/

Adjective

extra

  1. extra

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛks.tra/, /ˈɛs.tra/

Adjective

extra (invariable)

  1. extra
  2. select (best quality)

Noun

extra m (invariable)

  1. extra (something additional)

Preposition

extra

  1. outside of, aside from, not including

References


Latin

Etymology

Adverb contracted from the ablative exterā (parte), of exter.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈek.straː/, [ˈɛks̠(t̪)ɾäː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈek.stra/, [ˈɛkst̪rɑ]

Preposition

extrā (+ accusative)

  1. outside of
  2. beyond

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • extra in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • extra in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • extra in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • extra in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • Meyer-Lübke, Wilhelm (1911), “extra”, in Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), page 232
  • von Wartburg, Walther (1928–2002), “extra”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 30, page 330

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈes.tɾɐ/

Adjective

extra m or f (plural extras, comparable)

  1. extra (beyond what is due, usual, expected or necessary)
    Synonym: adicional

Noun

extra m (plural extras)

  1. anything that is extra
  2. bonus (extra amount of money given as a premium)
    Synonym: bónus

Noun

extra m, f (plural extras)

  1. (film) extra; walk-on (actor in a small role with no dialogue)
    Synonym: figurante

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈekstɾa/, [ˈeks.t̪ɾa]

Adjective

extra (plural extras)

  1. additional, extra
  2. superior
  3. extraordinary
    Synonym: extraordinario

Derived terms

  • horas extras

Noun

extra m or f (plural extras)

  1. extra (in a film)

Swedish

Pronunciation

Adjective

extra

  1. extra

Related terms

Adverb

extra

  1. extra


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈspɛə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈspɛəɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English spare, spar, from Old English spær (sparing, scant), from Proto-Germanic *sparaz (compare with Dutch spaar(zaam), German spar(sam) and spär(lich), Swedish spar(sam), Icelandic sparr (sparing)), from Proto-Indo-European *sper- (compare Latin (pro)sperus (lucky), Old Church Slavonic споръ (sporŭ, plentiful), Albanian shperr (earn money), Persian سپار(sepār, entrust; deposit), Ancient Greek σπαρνός (sparnós, rare), Sanskrit स्फिर (sphirá, thick)).

Adjective

spare (comparative sparer, superlative sparest)

  1. Scant; not abundant or plentiful.
  2. Sparing; frugal; parsimonious; not spending much money.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey of Cornwall
      He was spare, [] but discreet of speech.
  3. Being more than what is necessary, or what must be used or reserved; not wanted, or not used; superfluous.
  4. Held in reserve, to be used in an emergency.
  5. Not occupied or in current use.
  6. Lean; lacking flesh; meager; thin; gaunt.
  7. (Britain, informal) Very angry; frustrated or distraught.
    • 2006, Tate Hallaway, Tall, Dark & Dead:
      “That’ll drive him spare.”
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Welsh: sbâr
Translations

Noun

spare (plural spares)

  1. The act of sparing; moderation; restraint.
    • 1600, Philemon Holland, The Romane Historie
      men slaine, then without any spare at all they trampled over the dead carkasses
  2. Parsimony; frugal use.
  3. An opening in a petticoat or gown; a placket.
  4. That which has not been used or expended.
  5. A spare part, especially a spare tire.
  6. A superfluous or second-best person, specially (in a dynastic context) in the phrase “An heir and a spare“.
  7. (bowling) The right of bowling again at a full set of pins, after having knocked all the pins down in less than three bowls. If all the pins are knocked down in one bowl it is a double spare; in two bowls, a single spare.
  8. (bowling) The act of knocking down all remaining pins in second ball of a frame; this entitles the pins knocked down on the next ball to be added to the score for that frame.
  9. (Canada) A free period; a block of school during which one does not have a class.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English sparen, sparien, from Old English sparian (to spare, show mercy to, refrain from injuring or destroying), from Proto-Germanic *sparōną, *sparāną (to save, keep, spare), from Proto-Indo-European *sper- (to be productive, earn). Cognate with Scots spar, spare, spair (to spare), West Frisian sparje (to save, spare), Dutch sparen (to save, spare), German sparen (to save, conserve, economise), Swedish spara (to save, save up), Icelandic spara (to save, conserve).

Verb

spare (third-person singular simple present spares, present participle sparing, simple past and past participle spared)

  1. To show mercy.
    1. (intransitive) To desist; to stop; to refrain.
    2. (intransitive) To refrain from inflicting harm; to use mercy or forbearance.
    3. (transitive) To preserve from danger or punishment; to forbear to punish, injure, or harm; to show mercy.
      • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
        Kill me, if you please, or spare me.
  2. To keep.
    1. (intransitive) To be frugal; not to be profuse; to live frugally; to be parsimonious.
    2. (transitive) To keep to oneself; to forbear to impart or give.
    3. (transitive) To save or gain, as by frugality; to reserve, as from some occupation, use, or duty.
  3. (transitive) (to give up): To deprive oneself of, as by being frugal; to do without; to dispense with; to give up; to part with.
    • a. 1779, Earl of Roscommon, “The Twenty-second Ode of the First Book of Horace”:
      Where angry Jove did never spare / One breath of kind and temperate air.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, The History of Henry the Fourth (Part 1), Act V, scene iv:
      Poor Jack, farewell! / I could have better spared a better man
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Welsh: sbario
Translations

Anagrams

  • Asper, Earps, Pears, Peras, RESPA, Rapes, Spear, Spera, apers, apres, après, après-, aprés, as per, asper, pares, parse, pears, prase, presa, præs., rapes, reaps, sarpe, spear

Danish

Etymology 1

From English spare. Related to the following verb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɛːr/, [ˈsb̥ɛɐ̯], [ˈsb̥æɐ̯]

Noun

spare c (singular definite sparen, plural indefinite spare or spares)

  1. (bowling) spare (the act of knocking down all remaining pins in second ball of a frame)
Inflection

References

  • “spare,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

From Old Norse spara, from Proto-Germanic *sparāną, cognate with Swedish spara, English spare, German sparen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spaːrə/, [ˈsb̥ɑːɑ]
  • Homophones: sparer, sparre, sparrer

Verb

spare (past tense sparede, past participle sparet)

  1. to save
  2. to spare
  3. to economize
  4. to save up

Inflection

References

  • “spare,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

spare

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of sparen

French

Etymology 1

From Latin sparus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spaʁ/

Noun

spare m (plural spares)

  1. A fish of the superorder Acanthopterygii

Etymology 2

From English spare

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɛʁ/

Noun

spare m (plural spares)

  1. (bowling) a spare.

Related terms

  • strike

German

Verb

spare

  1. inflection of sparen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Italian

Verb

spare

  1. third-person singular present indicative of sparere

Anagrams

  • Serpa, Sprea, aspre, parse, persa, presa, raspe, saper, serpa, spera

Latin

Noun

spare

  1. vocative singular of sparus

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

spare

  1. Alternative form of sparre

Etymology 2

Verb

spare

  1. Alternative form of sparren (to close)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse spara

Verb

spare (imperative spar, present tense sparer, passive spares, simple past sparte, past participle spart, present participle sparende)

  1. to save

Derived terms

  • sparebank

References

  • “spare” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

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