extravagance vs profligacy what difference

what is difference between extravagance and profligacy

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French extravagance, from Medieval Latin extra + vagor (to wander).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɹævəɡəns/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧trav‧a‧gance

Noun

extravagance (countable and uncountable, plural extravagances)

  1. Excessive or superfluous expenditure of money.
  2. Prodigality, as of anger, love, expression, imagination, or demands.
    • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire. In fact, that arm-chair had been an extravagance of Mrs. Bunting. She had wanted her husband to be comfortable after the day’s work was done, and she had paid thirty-seven shillings for the chair.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • frugality
  • economize
  • moderation

Related terms

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑ̃s

Noun

extravagance f (plural extravagances)

  1. extravagance
    • 1837 Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Chapter I:
      Sa curiosité et son extravagance arrivèrent à ce point qu’il vendit plusieurs arpents de bonnes terres à labourer pour acheter des livres de chevalerie à lire.

      His curiosity and his extravagance came to the point that he sold several arpents of good working land to buy books of chivalry to read.

Related terms

  • extravagant
    • extravagamment

Further reading

  • “extravagance” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpɹɑflɪɡəsi/

Noun

profligacy (countable and uncountable, plural profligacies)

  1. (countable) Careless wastefulness.
    • 1791, Thomas Paine, Rights Of Man
      No question has arisen within the records of history that pressed with the importance of the present. [] whether man shall inherit his rights, and universal civilisation take place? Whether the fruits of his labours shall be enjoyed by himself or consumed by the profligacy of governments?
  2. (uncountable) Shameless and immoral behaviour.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      He had, indeed, reduced several women to a state of utter profligacy, had broke the hearts of some, and had the honour of occasioning the violent death of one poor girl, who had either drowned herself, or, what was rather more probable, had been drowned by him.

Synonyms

  • profligateness

Translations


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