extraverted vs extroverted what difference

what is difference between extraverted and extroverted

English

Etymology

From German extravertiert.

Adjective

extraverted (comparative more extraverted, superlative most extraverted)

  1. Alternative form of extroverted
    • 1915, Carl Jung, “On Psychological Understanding”, Journal of Abnormal Psychology, No. 9, p. 397:
      An extraverted individual can hardly understand the necessity that forces the introverted to accomplish his adaptation by first formulating a general conception.

Usage notes

Technical papers in psychology prefer extraverted, the spelling used by Carl Jung, although the spelling extroverted is more common in general use.

Verb

extraverted

  1. simple past tense and past participle of extravert


English

Alternative forms

  • (psychology): extraverted, extrovert

Etymology

A variant spelling of extraverted. Popularized as a psychological term by Phyllis Blanchard’s use of extrovert in her 1918 “Psycho-Analytic Study of August Comte”.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛkstɹəvəːtɪd/, /ɛkstɹəʊˈvəːtɪd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɛkstɹəˌvəɹtɪd/, /ɛkstɹoʊˈvəɹtɪd/

Verb

extroverted

  1. simple past tense and past participle of extrovert

Adjective

extroverted (comparative more extroverted, superlative most extroverted)

  1. Turned or thrust outwards, especially:
    • 1671, John Webster, Metallographa, p. 197:
      The external and combustible Sulphur… is… protruded and extroverted.
    1. (informal psychology) Of or characteristic of the personality of an extrovert: outgoing, sociable.
      She’s very extroverted. She’s always out meeting new people and looking for new experiences.
    2. (medicine) Synonym of inside-out.
      an extroverted bladder

Usage notes

Technical papers in psychology overwhelmingly prefer extraverted, although the spelling extroverted has become more common in general use.

Synonyms

  • extrorse (botany)

Antonyms

  • introverted

Translations

References

  • “extrovert, v.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1894.
  • Scott Barry Kaufman, “The Difference between ExtrAversion and ExtrOversion”, Beautiful Minds, Scientific American, Springer Nature America, 2015.

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