extreme vs uttermost what difference

what is difference between extreme and uttermost

English

Alternative forms

  • extream, extreame (obsolete)
  • xtreme (informal, nonstandard)

Etymology

Borrowed into late Middle English from Old French extreme, from Latin extrēmus, the superlative of exter.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɹiːm/, /ɛkˈstɹiːm/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɹim/
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Adjective

extreme (comparative extremer or more extreme, superlative extremest or most extreme)

  1. Of a place, the most remote, farthest or outermost.
  2. In the greatest or highest degree; intense.
  3. Excessive, or far beyond the norm.
  4. Drastic, or of great severity.
  5. Of sports, difficult or dangerous; performed in a hazardous environment.
  6. (archaic) Ultimate, final or last.
    the extreme hour of life

Synonyms

  • (place): farthest, furthest, most distant, outermost, remotest
  • (in greatest or highest degree): greatest, highest
  • (excessive): excessive, too much
  • (drastic): drastic, severe
  • (sports): dangerous
  • (ultimate): final, last, ultimate

Antonyms

  • (place): closest, nearest
  • (in greatest or highest degree): least
  • (excessive): moderate, reasonable
  • (drastic): moderate, reasonable

Derived terms

  • extremeness

Translations

Noun

extreme (plural extremes)

  1. The greatest or utmost point, degree or condition.
  2. Each of the things at opposite ends of a range or scale.
  3. A drastic expedient.
  4. (mathematics) Either of the two numbers at the ends of a proportion, as 1 and 6 in 1:2=3:6.

Translations

Adverb

extreme (comparative more extreme, superlative most extreme)

  1. (archaic) Extremely.
    • 1796 Charles Burney, Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Metastasio 2.5:
      In the empty and extreme cold theatre.

Usage notes

  • Formerly used to modify adjectives and sometimes adverbs, but rarely verbs.

Derived terms

  • extremism
  • extremist
  • extremity
  • extremely
  • extreme ironing
  • extreme unction

Related terms

  • extremum

See also

  • mean

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “extreme”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

extreme

  1. Inflected form of extreem

German

Pronunciation

Adjective

extreme

  1. inflection of extrem:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Ido

Adverb

extreme

  1. extremely

Latin

Noun

extrēme

  1. vocative singular of extrēmus

References

  • extreme in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • extreme in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Middle French

Adjective

extreme m or f (plural extremes)

  1. extreme

Spanish

Verb

extreme

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of extremar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of extremar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of extremar.

Swedish

Adjective

extreme

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of extrem.


English

Etymology

Middle English, alteration of uttermest. More at utmost for the etymology of the latter element.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈʌtəɹmoʊst/

Adjective

uttermost (not comparable)

  1. Outermost.
  2. Extreme; utmost; of the farthest, greatest, or highest degree.
    • Psalms 65:8
      They also that dwell in the uttermost parts are afraid at thy tokens: thou makest the outgoings of the morning and evening to rejoice.

Noun

uttermost (usually uncountable, plural uttermosts)

  1. The utmost; the highest or greatest degree; the farthest extent.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I scene i[1]:
      Thou know’st that all my fortunes are at sea;
      Neither have I money, nor commodity
      To raise a present sum: therefore, go forth;
      Try what my credit can in Venice do:
      That shall be rack’d, even to the uttermost,
      To furnish thee to Belmont, to fair Portia.
      Go, presently inquire, and so will I,
      Where money is; and I no question make,
      To have it of my trust or for my sake.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 563:
      [] So we cried to him, “O Rais, what is the matter?”; and he replied saying, “Seek ye deliverance of the Most High from the strait into which we have fallen and bemoan yourselves and take leave of one another; for know that the wind hath gotten the mastery of us and hath driven us into the uttermost of the seas of the world.”
    • 1943, John Temple Graves, The Fighting South (page 274):
      The free way will call for uttermosts in civilization, self-discipline and human excellence.

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