extremist vs radical what difference

what is difference between extremist and radical

English

Etymology

extreme +‎ -ist

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɹiːmɪst/, /ɛkˈstɹiːmɪst/

Noun

extremist (plural extremists)

  1. A person who holds extreme views, especially one who advocates such views; a radical or fanatic.
    • 2018, Edo Konrad, “Living in the constant shadow of settler violence”, +972 Magazine:

Translations

Adjective

extremist (comparative more extremist, superlative most extremist)

  1. Holding extreme views, especially on a political subject.
  2. Of or relating to extremism.

Translations


Dutch

Etymology

From extreem +‎ -ist. Perhaps borrowed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɛks.treːˈmɪst/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧tre‧mist
  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Noun

extremist m (plural extremisten, diminutive extremistje n)

  1. extremist

Derived terms

  • links-extremist
  • rechts-extremist

Related terms

  • extreem
  • extremisme

Romanian

Etymology

From French extrémiste

Noun

extremist m (plural extremiști)

  1. extremist

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

extrem +‎ -ist

Noun

extremist c

  1. an extremist

Declension

Related terms

  • högerextremist
  • vänsterextremist


English

Etymology

From French radical, from Late Latin rādīcālis (of or pertaining to the root, having roots, radical), from Latin rādix (root); see radix.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rădʹĭk-əl, IPA(key): /ˈɹædɪkəl/
  • Homophone: radicle

Adjective

radical (comparative more radical, superlative most radical)

  1. Favoring fundamental change, or change at the root cause of a matter.
  2. (botany, not comparable) Pertaining to a root (of a plant).
  3. Pertaining to the basic or intrinsic nature of something.
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
      The most determined exertions of that authority, against them, only showed their radical independence.
    Synonym: fundamental
    Antonyms: ignorable, trivial
  4. Thoroughgoing; far-reaching.
  5. (lexicography, not comparable) Of or pertaining to the root of a word.
  6. (phonology, phonetics, not comparable, of a sound) Produced using the root of the tongue.
    Coordinate terms: coronal, dorsal, labial, laryngeal
  7. (chemistry, not comparable) Involving free radicals.
  8. (mathematics) Relating to a radix or mathematical root.
  9. (slang, 1980s & 1990s) Excellent; awesome.

Synonyms

  • (linguistics, in reference to words): primitive

Antonyms

  • (linguistics, in reference to words): derivative, derived

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

radical (plural radicals)

  1. (historical, 19th-century Britain) A member of the most progressive wing of the Liberal Party; someone favouring social reform (but generally stopping short of socialism).
  2. (historical, early 20th-century France) A member of an influential, centrist political party favouring moderate social reform, a republican constitution, and secular politics.
  3. A person with radical opinions.
  4. (arithmetic) A root (of a number or quantity).
  5. (linguistics) In logographic writing systems such as the Chinese writing system, the portion of a character (if any) that provides an indication of its meaning, as opposed to phonetic.
  6. In Semitic languages, any one of the set of consonants (typically three) that make up a root.
  7. (chemistry) A group of atoms, joined by covalent bonds, that take part in reactions as a single unit.
  8. (organic chemistry) A free radical.
  9. (algebra, commutative algebra, ring theory, of an ideal) Given an ideal I in a commutative ring R, another ideal, denoted Rad(I) or





    I




    {\displaystyle {\sqrt {I}}}

    , such that an element xR is in Rad(I) if, for some positive integer n, xnI; equivalently, the intersection of all prime ideals containing I.

  10. (algebra, ring theory, of a ring) Given a ring R, an ideal containing elements of R that share a property considered, in some sense, “not good”.
  11. (algebra, ring theory, of a module) The intersection of maximal submodules of a given module.
  12. (number theory) The product of the distinct prime factors of a given positive integer.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • nilradical

Translations

References

  • radical in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • radical in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “radical” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 251.

Further reading

  • Radical on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Radical of an ideal on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Radical of a ring on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Radical of a module on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Radical of an integer on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Radical of an ideal on Encyclopedia of Mathematics
  • Ideal Radical on Wolfram MathWorld

Anagrams

  • aldaric, cardial

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /rə.diˈkal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ra.diˈkal/

Adjective

radical (masculine and feminine plural radicals)

  1. radical

Derived terms

  • radicalment
  • radicalisme
  • radicalitzar

Noun

radical m or f (plural radicals)

  1. radical

Further reading

  • “radical” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “radical” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “radical” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “radical” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin rādīcālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁa.di.kal/
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Homophones: radicale, radicales

Adjective

radical (feminine singular radicale, masculine plural radicaux, feminine plural radicales)

  1. radical

Noun

radical m (plural radicaux)

  1. (linguistics, grammar) radical, root

Further reading

  • “radical” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Pronunciation

Noun

radical m (plural radicais)

  1. radical (in various senses)

Derived terms

  • radicalismo
  • radicalizar
  • radicalmente

Further reading

  • “radical” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ra‧di‧cal
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Noun

radical m (plural radicais)

  1. (linguistic morphology) root (primary lexical unit of a word)
    Synonym: raiz

Noun

radical m, f (plural radicais)

  1. radical (person holding unorthodox views)
    Synonym: extremista

Adjective

radical m or f (plural radicais, comparable)

  1. radical (favouring fundamental change)
  2. drastic; extreme
  3. (Brazil, slang) excellent; awesome; thrilling
  4. (sports) extreme (dangerous)

Derived terms

  • radicalismo
  • radicalizar
  • radicalmente

Further reading

  • “radical” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Adjective

radical m or n (feminine singular radicală, masculine plural radicali, feminine and neuter plural radicale)

  1. radical

Declension

Related terms

  • radicalist
  • radicaliza

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin rādīcālis or Latin rādīx + Spanish suffix -al.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /radiˈkal/, [ra.ð̞iˈkal]
  • Hyphenation: ra‧di‧cal

Adjective

radical (plural radicales)

  1. radical, seismic

Derived terms

  • radicalismo
  • radicalizar
  • radicalmente

Noun

radical m (plural radicales)

  1. radical

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “radical” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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