extrusion vs jut what difference

what is difference between extrusion and jut

English

Etymology

Mid-16th century from Latin extrūdere, from ex- (out) +‎ trūdere (to thrust).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -uːʒən

Noun

extrusion (countable and uncountable, plural extrusions)

  1. A manufacturing process where a billet of material is pushed and/or drawn through a die to create a shaped rod, rail or pipe.
  2. An item formed by the process of extrusion.

Related terms

  • extrude

Translations

Further reading

  • extrusion on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.stʁy.zjɔ̃/

Noun

extrusion f (plural extrusions)

  1. extrusion

Further reading

  • “extrusion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From Middle English [Term?], alteration of jet, cognate with jetty.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒʌt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌt

Verb

jut (third-person singular simple present juts, present participle jutting, simple past and past participle jutted)

  1. (intransitive) To stick out.
    • 1725-1726, William Broome, The Odyssey
      It seems to jut out of the structure of the poem.
  2. (obsolete) To butt.
    • 1772-1782, William Mason, The English Garden
      the jutting steer

Derived terms

  • jaw-jutting

Translations

Noun

jut (plural juts)

  1. Something that sticks out.
    Synonyms: outcrop, protrusion
    • 1999, Stardust, Neil Gaiman, page 3 (2001 Perennial Edition).
      The town of Wall stands today as it has stood for six hundred years, on a high jut of granite amidst a small forest woodland.

Translations

Anagrams

  • UJT

Gothic

Romanization

jut

  1. Romanization of ????????????

Hungarian

Etymology

From Proto-Ugric *juktɜ- (to come).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈjut]
  • Rhymes: -ut

Verb

jut

  1. (intransitive) to get somewhere (to a location or a situation), to arrive
    Synonyms: érkezik, kerül
    • 1958, Miklós Szenczi (translator), Jane Austen (author), Büszkeség és balítélet (Pride and Prejudice)
      Fél mérföldön át egyre fölfelé vitt az útjuk, s végül elég magas dombtetőre jutottak, ahol véget ér az erdő, (…)

      They gradually ascended for half-a-mile, and then found themselves at the top of a considerable eminence, where the wood ceased, (…)
      Két nappal ezelőtt megdöbbentő hír jutott a fülembe.

      A report of a most alarming nature reached me two days ago.

      (Literally: “…got into my ears…”)
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) to arrive at, come to (a decision, an agreement, an understanding, a conclusion, or a result)
    • 1958, Miklós Szenczi (translator), Jane Austen (author), Büszkeség és balítélet (Pride and Prejudice)
      Először is az egyházi adó kérdésében olyan megegyezésre kell jutnia, amely hasznos reá magára nézve, de a kegyúr érdekeit sem sérti.

      In the first place, he must make such an agreement for tithes as a may be beneficial to himself and not offensive to his patron.
  3. (intransitive) to come by something (-hoz/-hez/-höz)
    Synonym: kap
    • 1976, Mária Borbás (translator), Jane Austen (author), Értelem és érzelem (Sense and Sensibility)
      Mrs. Dashwood elküldte válaszát, s tüstént abban az élvezetben részesítette magát, hogy bejelentette mostohafiának és a feleségének: házhoz jutott

      No sooner was her answer dispatched, than Mrs. Dashwood indulged herself in the pleasure of announcing to her son-in-law and his wife that she was provided with a house
    • 1983, Mária Borbás (translator), Jane Austen (author), A klastrom titka (Northanger Abbey)
      Váratlanul ranghoz és vagyonhoz jutott, és így elhárult minden akadály;

      His unexpected accession to title and fortune had removed all his difficulties;
  4. (intransitive) to be left to someone, to be given or afforded to someone (-nak/-nek)
    • 1958, Miklós Szenczi (translator), Jane Austen (author), Büszkeség és balítélet (Pride and Prejudice)
      Valami nagy hiba történhetett a két fiatalember nevelése körül. Az egyiknek jutott minden jóság, a másiknak csak a látszata.

      There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.

      (Literally: “to one of them got all the goodness,…”)
      Edwardnak jutott osztályrészül az elsőnek érkezett előjoga, (…)

      Edward was allowed to retain the privilege of first comer, (…)
      (…) Robert életmódjában, beszédében mi sem késztethetett ama gyanúra, hogy (…) bátyjának keveset hagyott, sem hogy neki magának túlságosan sok jutott;

      (…) nothing ever appeared in Robert’s style of living or of talking to give a suspicion of (…) either leaving his brother too little, or bringing himself too much;

      (Literally: “too much got to himself”)

Conjugation

Derived terms

(With verbal prefixes):

References

Further reading

  • jut in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Old French

Verb

jut

  1. third-person singular past historic of gesir

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