exudate vs ooze what difference

what is difference between exudate and ooze

English

Etymology

exude +‎ -ate

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛksjʊdeɪt/, /ˈɛɡzjʊdeɪt/

Noun

exudate (plural exudates)

  1. A fluid that has exuded from somewhere; especially one that has exuded from a pore of an animal or plant.
    • 1861 Stephen Jennings Goodfellow – Lectures on the Diseases of the Kidney, Generally Known as Brights Disease, and Dropsy
      The whitish lines of exudate seem at times to penetrate even between the straight tubes . . .
    • 2005 Selma Tibi – The Medicinal Use of Opium in Ninth-century Baghdad
      When this is done, one should leave the poppy for some time, then return to it and gather any further exudate.

Translations

Verb

exudate (third-person singular simple present exudates, present participle exudating, simple past and past participle exudated)

  1. (obsolete) To exude.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: o͞oz, IPA(key): /uːz/
  • Rhymes: -uːz
  • Homophone: oohs

Etymology 1

  • (Noun) Middle English wose (sap), from Old English wōs (sap, froth), from Proto-Germanic *wōsą (cf. Middle Low German wose (scum), Old High German wasal (rain), Old Swedish os, oos), from Proto-Indo-European *wóseh₂ (sap) (cf. Sanskrit वसा (vásā, fat)).
  • (Verb) Middle English wosen, from wose (wose, sap); see above.

Alternative forms

  • owze (obsolete)

Noun

ooze (countable and uncountable, plural oozes)

  1. Tanning liquor, an aqueous extract of vegetable matter (tanbark, sumac, etc.) in a tanning vat used to tan leather.
  2. An oozing, gentle flowing, or seepage, as of water through sand or earth.
  3. (obsolete) Secretion, humour.
  4. (obsolete) Juice, sap.
Translations

Verb

ooze (third-person singular simple present oozes, present participle oozing, simple past and past participle oozed)

  1. (intransitive, sometimes figuratively) To be secreted or slowly leak.
    • 1868, Charlotte Riddell, A Strange Christmas Game
      I promised him I would keep silence, but the story gradually oozed out, and the Cronsons left the country.
    • 1988, David Drake, The Sea Hag, Baen Publishing Enterprises (2003), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      Pale slime oozed through all the surfaces; some of it dripped from the ceiling and burned Dennis as badly as the blazing sparks had done a moment before.
    • 1994, Madeleine May Kunin, Living a Political Life, Vintage Books (1995), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      He was hard to understand because he spoke softly, and his Vermont accent was as thick as maple syrup oozing down a pile of pancakes.
    • 2011, Karen Mahoney, The Iron Witch, Flux (2011), →ISBN, page 278:
      Her heart constricted when she saw thick blood oozing from a wide gash in his forehead.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To give off a strong sense of (something); to exude.
    • 1989, Robert R. McCammon, The Wolf’s Hour, Open Road Integrated Media (2011), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      “Good servants are so hard to find,” Chesna said, oozing arrogance.
    • 1999, Tamsin Blanchard, Antonio Berardi: Sex and Sensibility, Watson-Guptill Publications (1999), →ISBN, page 16:
      There are no two ways about it: a Berardi dress oozes sex appeal from its very seams.
Derived terms
  • oozy
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English wose, from Old English wāse (mud, mire), from Proto-West Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *waisǭ (compare Dutch waas (haze, mist; bloom), (obsolete) German Wasen (turf, sod), Old Norse veisa (slime, stagnant pool)), from Proto-Indo-European *weys- (to flow) (compare Sanskrit विष्यति (viṣyati, flow, let loose)). More at virus.

Noun

ooze (plural oozes)

  1. Soft mud, slime, or shells especially in the bed of a river or estuary.
  2. (oceanography) A pelagic marine sediment containing a significant amount of the microscopic remains of either calcareous or siliceous planktonic debris organisms.
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, The Last Man, volume 3, chapter
      Seaweed were left on the blackened marble, while the salt ooze defaced the matchless works of art.
  3. A piece of soft, wet, pliable ground.

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