exuviate vs shed what difference

what is difference between exuviate and shed

English

Etymology

From Latin exuviae (what is shed), from exuō (cast off, strip)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzjuː.vɪ.eɪt/, /ɛkˈsuː.vɪ.eɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɛkˈsuː.vɪ.eɪt/, /ɛɡˈzuː.vɪ.eɪt/
  • ,

Verb

exuviate (third-person singular simple present exuviates, present participle exuviating, simple past and past participle exuviated)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, rare) To shed or cast off a covering, especially a skin; to slough; to molt (moult).

Synonyms

  • (to shed or cast off a covering): moult, molt, slough

Related terms

  • exuviae
  • exuvial
  • exuviation
  • exuvious

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: shěd, IPA(key): /ʃɛd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛd

Etymology 1

From Middle English scheden, schede, from Old English scēadan, scādan (to separate, divide, part, make a line of separation between; remove from association or companionship; distinguish, discriminate, decide, determine, appoint; shatter, shed; expound; decree; write down; differ), from Proto-West Germanic *skaiþan, from Proto-Germanic *skaiþaną (compare West Frisian skiede, Dutch and German scheiden), from Proto-Indo-European *skeyt- (to cut, part, divide, separate), from *skey-.

See also Welsh chwydu (to break open), Lithuanian skėsti (to spread), skíesti (to separate), Old Church Slavonic цѣдити (cěditi, to filter, strain), Ancient Greek σχίζω (skhízō, to split), Old Armenian ցտեմ (cʿtem, to scratch), Sanskrit च्यति (cyáti, he cuts off)). Related to shoad, shit.

Verb

shed (third-person singular simple present sheds, present participle shedding, simple past and past participle shed or (nonstandard) shedded)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, Britain, dialectal) To part, separate or divide.
    • c. 1380, Geoffrey Chaucer, Boece
      If there be any thing that knitteth himself to the ilk middle point [of a circle], it is constrained into simplicity (that is to say, into unmovablity), and it ceaseth to be shed and to flit diversely.
    • 1460–1500, The Poems of Robert Henryson
      The northern wind had shed the misty clouds from the sky;
    • 1635, “Sermon on Philippians III, 7, 8”, in Select Practical Writings of David Dickson (1845), Volume 1, page 166 Internet Archive
      Lest [] ye shed with God.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To part with, separate from, leave off; cast off, let fall, be divested of.
    • 1707, John Mortimer, The whole Art of Husbandry
      White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.
    • 2012 November 2, Ken Belson, “[1],” New York Times (retrieved 2 November 2012):
      She called on all the marathoners to go to Staten Island to help with the clean-up effort and to bring the clothes they would have shed at the start to shelters or other places where displaced people were in need.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To pour; to make flow.
  4. (transitive) To allow to flow or fall.
  5. (transitive) To radiate, cast, give off (light); see also shed light on.
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To pour forth, give off, impart.
  7. (obsolete, intransitive) To fall in drops; to pour.
    • swich a reyn doun fro the welkne shadde
  8. To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.
    • 1606, Ben Jonson, Hymenaei
      Her hair [] is shed with gray.
  9. (weaving) To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.

Derived terms

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sched, schede, schad, from a combination of Old English scēada (a parting of the hair, top of the head) and Old English ġesċēad (distinction, reason).

Alternative forms

  • shode (dialectal)
  • shead, shede (obsolete)

Noun

shed (plural sheds)

  1. (weaving) An area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven.
  2. (obsolete) A distinction or dividing-line.
  3. (obsolete) A parting in the hair.
  4. (obsolete) The top of the head.
  5. (obsolete) An area of land as distinguished from those around it.
  6. (physics) A unit of area equivalent to 10-52 square meters

Derived terms

  • countershed
  • watershed

Translations

Etymology 3

Dialectal variant of a specialized use of shade.

Noun

shed (plural sheds)

  1. A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut.
    a wagon shed; a wood shed; a garden shed
  2. A large temporary open structure for reception of goods.
  3. (Britain, derogatory, informal) An automobile which is old, worn-out, slow, or otherwise of poor quality.
  4. (Britain, rail transportation) A British Rail Class 66 locomotive.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Scottish Gaelic: seada
  • Welsh: sièd

Translations

See also

Verb

shed (third-person singular simple present sheds, present participle shedding, simple past and past participle shedded)

  1. To place or allocate a vehicle, such as a locomotive, in or to a depot or shed.
  2. (transitive, music) to woodshed

References

  • “shed”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • edhs, heds

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • shedu

Etymology

From Latin sedeō. Compare Romanian ședea, șed.

Verb

shed (third-person singular present indicative shadi / shade, past participle shidzutã)

  1. I sit.

Related terms

See also

  • mi-ashedzu

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