eyeball vs orb what difference

what is difference between eyeball and orb

English

Alternative forms

  • eye-ball (obsolete)

Etymology

From eye +‎ ball. Compare Middle English balle off the eye, balle of þe eyȝe (eyeball, literally ball of the eye).

Pronunciation

Noun

eyeball (plural eyeballs)

  1. The ball of the eye.
    • 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I Scene 2
      Go, make thyself like a nymph o’ th’ sea.
      Be subject to no sight but thine and mine, invisible
      To every eyeball else. Go, take this shape,
      And hither come in’t; go! Hence, with diligence!
  2. A person’s focus of attention.
  3. (marketing, in the plural) A readership or viewership.
    We need compelling content for the new Web site so we can attract more eyeballs.
  4. (CB radio, slang) A face-to-face meeting.
  5. (Caribbean) A favourite or pet; the apple of someone’s eye.

Synonyms

  • eye-apple

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

eyeball (third-person singular simple present eyeballs, present participle eyeballing, simple past and past participle eyeballed)

  1. To gauge, estimate or judge by eye, rather than measuring precisely; to look or glance at.
  2. To scrutinize
  3. To stare at intently
    Are you eyeballing my girl?
  4. To roll one’s eyes.

Derived terms

  • eyeballer

Translations

See also

  • bums in seats
  • click-through


English

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /oɹb/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɔː(ɹ)b/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(r)b

Etymology 1

From Middle English orbe, from Old French orbe, from Latin orbis (circle, orb). Compare orbit.

Noun

orb (plural orbs)

  1. A spherical body; a sphere, especially one of the celestial spheres; a sun, planet, or star
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, A Lover’s Complaint
      In the small orb of one particular tear.
  2. One of the azure transparent spheres conceived by the ancients to be enclosed one within another, and to carry the heavenly bodies in their revolutions
  3. (architecture) A structural motif or finial in the shape of a sphere
  4. An orbit of an heavenly body
    • 1612, Francis Bacon, Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall, “Of Superstition”
      The schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics, and epicycles, and such engines of orbs.
  5. (rare) The time period of an orbit
  6. (poetic) The eye, seen as a luminous and spherical entity
  7. (poetic) Any revolving circular body, such as a wheel
  8. (rare) A sphere of action.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, “Essay, Supplementary to the Preface”
      By what fatality the orb of my genius [] acts upon these men like the moon upon a certain description of patients, it would be irksome to inquire
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre Act 1 Scene 2
      But in our orbs we’ll live so round and safe.
  9. A globus cruciger; a ceremonial sphere used to represent royal or imperial power
  10. A translucent sphere appearing in flash photography (Orb (optics))
  11. (military) A body of soldiers drawn up in a circle, as for defence, especially infantry to repel cavalry.
Synonyms
  • (spherical body): ball, globe, sphere
  • (circle): circle, orbit
  • (a period of time): See Thesaurus:year
  • (an eye): See Thesaurus:eye
  • (revolving circular body): roller, wheel
  • (sphere of action): area, domain, field, province
  • (monarch’s ceremonial sphere): globe, globus cruciger, mound, orb
  • (military formation): globe
Translations

Verb

orb (third-person singular simple present orbs, present participle orbing, simple past and past participle orbed)

  1. (poetic, transitive) To form into an orb or circle.
    • 1842, James Russell Lowell, sonnet
      a full-orbed sun
  2. (poetic, intransitive) To become round like an orb.
  3. (poetic, transitive) To encircle; to surround; to enclose.
    • 1717, Joseph Addison, Metamorphoses
      The wheels were orbed with gold.

Etymology 2

From Old French orb (blind), from Latin orbus (destitute).

Noun

orb (plural orbs)

  1. (architecture) A blank window or panel.
    • 1845, Robert Willis, The Architectural History of Canterbury Cathedral
      small blank windows or panels, for in later times such panels were called orbs, blind windows

References

  • orb in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • BOR, Bor, Bor., ROB, Rob, bor, bro, bro., rob

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • orbu

Etymology

From Latin orbus. Compare Romanian orb.

Adjective

orb m (feminine singular orbe, masculine plural orghi, feminine plural orbi)

  1. blind
  2. (figuratively) ignorant
  3. (figuratively) uncultivated, unrefined, uncivilized

Related terms

  • urbari
  • urbiatse

See also

  • chior

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan (compare Occitan òrb), from Latin orbus (ab oculīs) (literally deprived of eyes) (compare Italian orbo, Romanian orb, French aveugle from the other half of the idiom), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos (orphan).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɔɾp/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈɔrp/

Adjective

orb (feminine orba, masculine plural orbs, feminine plural orbes)

  1. blind

Synonyms

  • cec

Noun

orb m (uncountable)

  1. a fungal disease of wheat and other cereals

Estonian

Etymology

Borrowed from Finnish orpo, from Proto-Finno-Ugric *orpa, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *arbha-s. Cognate with Hungarian árva.

Noun

orb (genitive orvu, partitive orbu)

  1. orphan

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

From Latin orbus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃órbʰos (orphan). Compare Italian orbo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /orb/

Adjective

orb m or n (feminine singular oarbă, masculine plural orbi, feminine and neuter plural oarbe)

  1. blind

Declension

Noun

orb m (plural orbi, feminine equivalent oarbă)

  1. blind man

Declension

Derived terms

  • orbeț
  • orbi

Related terms

  • orbecăi

See also

  • chior
  • mut
  • surd
  • vedea

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