eyelet vs loop what difference

what is difference between eyelet and loop

English

Etymology

From Middle English oylet, from Old French oillet, equivalent to Old French oil (eye) + -et (diminutive suffix). Spelling as eye +‎ -let is due to folk etymology.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɪ.lət/
  • Homophone: islet

Noun

eyelet (plural eyelets)

  1. An object that consists of a rim and small hole or perforation to receive a cord or fastener, as in garments, sails, etc. An eyelet may reinforce a hole.
    Push the aglet of the shoelace through each of the eyelets, one at a time.
  2. A shaped metal embellishment containing a hole, used in scrapbook. Eyelets are typically set by punching a hole in the page, placing the smooth side of the eyelet on a table, positioning the paper over protruding edge and curling the edge down using a hammer and eyelet setter.
  3. Cotton fabric with small holes.
  4. The contact tip of the base of a light bulb.
  5. A peephole.
  6. A little eye.

Coordinate terms

  • grommet

Translations

Verb

eyelet (third-person singular simple present eyelets, present participle eyeleting, simple past and past participle eyeleted)

  1. (transitive) To make eyelets in.

References



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /luːp/
  • Rhymes: -uːp
  • Homophone: loupe

Etymology 1

From Middle English loupe (noose, loop), earlier lowp-knot (loop-knot), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse hlaup (a run), used in the sense of a “running knot”, from hlaupa (to leap), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hlaupaną (to leap, run). Compare Swedish löp-knut (loop-knot), Danish løb-knude (a running knot), Danish løb (a course). More at leap.

Noun

loop (plural loops)

  1. A length of thread, line or rope that is doubled over to make an opening.
  2. The opening so formed.
  3. A shape produced by a curve that bends around and crosses itself.
    Arches, loops, and whorls are patterns found in fingerprints.
  4. A ring road or beltway.
  5. An endless strip of tape or film allowing continuous repetition.
  6. A complete circuit for an electric current.
  7. (programming) A programmed sequence of instructions that is repeated until or while a particular condition is satisfied.
  8. (graph theory) An edge that begins and ends on the same vertex.
  9. (topology) A path that starts and ends at the same point.
  10. (transport) A bus or rail route, walking route, etc. that starts and ends at the same point.
  11. (rail transport) A place at a terminus where trains or trams can turn round and go back the other way without having to reverse; a balloon loop, turning loop, or reversing loop.
  12. (algebra) A quasigroup with an identity element.
  13. A loop-shaped intrauterine device.
  14. An aerobatic maneuver in which an aircraft flies a circular path in a vertical plane.
  15. A small, narrow opening; a loophole.
  16. Alternative form of loup (mass of iron).
  17. (biochemistry) A flexible region in a protein’s secondary structure.
Hypernyms
  • control structure
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • loophole
  • loop line, loopline
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From the noun.

Verb

loop (third-person singular simple present loops, present participle looping, simple past and past participle looped)

  1. (transitive) To form something into a loop.
  2. (transitive) To fasten or encircle something with a loop.
  3. (transitive) To fly an aircraft in a loop.
  4. (transitive) To move something in a loop.
  5. (transitive) To join electrical components to complete a circuit.
  6. (transitive) To duplicate the route of a pipeline.
  7. (transitive) To create an error in a computer program so that it runs in an endless loop and the computer freezes up.
  8. (intransitive) To form a loop.
  9. (intransitive) To move in a loop.
    The program loops until the user presses a key.
  10. To place in a loop.
Derived terms
Translations

References

  • loop on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

See also

  • Appendix:Parts of the knot

Anagrams

  • OOPL, Polo, Pool, polo, pool

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lʊəp/

Etymology 1

From Dutch lopen, from Middle Dutch lôpen, from Old Dutch lōpan, from Proto-West Germanic *hlaupan, from Proto-Germanic *hlaupaną (to run).

Verb

loop (present loop, present participle lopende, past participle geloop)

  1. (intransitive) to walk
Alternative forms
  • loep (Western Cape)

Etymology 2

From Dutch loop, from Middle Dutch lôop, from Old Dutch *lōp.

Noun

loop (plural lope, diminutive lopie)

  1. walking, gait
  2. (of events) course
  3. (of guns) barrel
  4. (informal) business end (of a rifle, etc.)
  5. (music, usually in diminutive) run: a rapid passage in music, especially along a scale

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːp/
  • Hyphenation: loop
  • Rhymes: -oːp

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch lôop, from Old Dutch *lōp.

Noun

loop m (plural lopen, diminutive loopje n)

  1. course, duration
  2. a river course
  3. course of a projectile
  4. barrel (of a firearm)
Derived terms
Related terms
  • lopen
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: loop
  • Indonesian: lop
  • Papiamentu: lop

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

loop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lopen
  2. imperative of lopen

Anagrams

  • Pool, pool

Portuguese

Noun

loop m (plural loops)

  1. (computing) loop (repeating sequence of instructions)
  2. loop (aircraft manoeuvre)

Synonyms

  • (programmed sequence of instructions): ciclo, laço
  • (aircraft manoeuvre): looping

Derived terms

  • in loop

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