eyepatch vs patch what difference

what is difference between eyepatch and patch

English

Noun

eyepatch (plural eyepatches)

  1. Alternative form of eye patch


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pætʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ætʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English patche, pacche, of uncertain origin. Perhaps an alteration of earlier Middle English placche (patch, spot, piece of cloth), from Old English *plæċċ, *pleċċ (a spot, mark, patch), from Proto-Germanic *plakjō (spot, stain). For the loss of l compare pat from Middle English platten. Germanic cognates would then include Middle English plecke, dialectal English pleck (plot of ground, patch), West Frisian plak (place, spot), Low German Plakk, Plakke (spot, piece, patch), Dutch plek (spot, place, stain, patch), Dutch plak (piece, slab), Swedish plagg (garment), Faroese plagg (cloth, rag).

Or, possibly a variant of Old French pieche, dialectal variant of piece (piece). Compare also Old Occitan petaç (patch).

Noun

patch (plural patches)

  1. A piece of cloth, or other suitable material, sewed or otherwise fixed upon a garment to repair or strengthen it, especially upon an old garment to cover a hole.
  2. A small piece of anything used to repair damage or a breach; as, a patch on a kettle, a roof, etc.
  3. A piece of any size, used to repair something for a temporary period only, or that it is temporary because it is not meant to last long or will be removed as soon as a proper repair can be made, which will happen in the near future.
  4. A small, usually contrasting but always somehow different or distinct, part of something else (location, time, size)
  5. (specifically) A small area, a small plot of land or piece of ground.
  6. A local region of professional responsibility.
    • 1980, Noel Parry, Michael Rustin, Carole Satyamurti, Social Work, Welfare & the State (page 101)
      [] formed a contact with a man, who was the secretary of the tenants’ association of a small housing estate in the social worker’s patch.
  7. (historical) A small piece of black silk stuck on the face or neck to heighten beauty by contrast, worn by ladies in the 17th and 18th centuries; an imitation beauty mark.
    • Your black patches you wear variously.
  8. (medicine) A piece of material used to cover a wound.
  9. (medicine) An adhesive piece of material, impregnated with a drug, which is worn on the skin, the drug being slowly absorbed over a period of time.
  10. (medicine) A cover worn over a damaged eye, an eyepatch.
  11. A block on the muzzle of a gun, to do away with the effect of dispart, in sighting.
  12. (computing) A patch file, a file that describes changes to be made to a computer file or files, usually changes made to a computer program that fix a programming bug.
  13. (firearms) A small piece of material that is manually passed through a gun barrel to clean it.
  14. (firearms) A piece of greased cloth or leather used as wrapping for a rifle ball, to make it fit the bore.
  15. (often patch cable, patch cord, etc.; see also patch panel) A cable connecting two pieces of electrical equipment.
  16. A sound setting for a musical synthesizer (originally selected by means of a patch cable).
  17. (printing, historical) An overlay used to obtain a stronger impression.
Synonyms
  • (piece of black silk): beauty spot
  • (a small, distinct part of something larger): section, area, blotch, spot, period of time, spell, stretch
  • (a small area, plot of land, or piece of ground): tract
  • (computing: file describing changes): diff file
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

patch (third-person singular simple present patches, present participle patching, simple past and past participle patched)

  1. To mend by sewing on a piece or pieces of cloth, leather, or the like
  2. To mend with pieces; to repair by fastening pieces on.
  3. To make out of pieces or patches, like a quilt.
  4. To join or unite the pieces of; to patch the skirt.
  5. To employ a temporary, removable electronic connection, as one between two components in a communications system.
    • 2003, The Matrix Revolutions, Scene: Starting the Logos, 00:43:09 – 00:43:32
      [the control panel of hovercraft The Logos has lit up after being jumped by The Hammer]
      Sparky: She lives again.
      Crew member of The Hammer via radio: You want us to patch an uplink to reload the software, Sparky?
      Sparky: Yeah, that’d be swell. And can you clean the windshield while you’re at it?
  6. (generally with the particle “up”) To repair or arrange in a hasty or clumsy manner
  7. (computing) To make the changes a patch describes; to apply a patch to the files in question. Hence:
    1. To fix or improve a computer program without a complete upgrade.
    2. To make a quick and possibly temporary change to a program.
  8. To connect two pieces of electrical equipment using a cable.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:repair
Translations

See also

  • diff
  • diff file

References

Etymology 2

Perhaps borrowed from Italian pazzo or paggio; the form influenced by folk etymological association with patch (Etymology 1).

Noun

patch (plural patches)

  1. (archaic) A paltry fellow; a rogue; a ninny; a fool.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II scene v[1]:
      Shylock:
      The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder,
      Snail-slow in profit, and he sleeps by day
      More than the wild-cat; []
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act III scene ii[2]:
      Caliban: What a pied ninny’s this! Thou scurvy patch! []
Derived terms
  • crosspatch

Further reading

  • patch in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • patch in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • patch at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • chapt, p’tcha

Czech

Etymology

From English patch.

Noun

patch m

  1. (informal) patch (file that describes changes to be made to a computer file or files)
    Synonym: záplata

French

Etymology

From English patch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /patʃ/

Noun

patch f (plural patchs)

  1. (computing) patch (piece of code used to fix a bug)

Yola

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

patch

  1. a sand bank

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial