fabrication vs fiction what difference

what is difference between fabrication and fiction

English

Etymology

From Middle French fabrication, from Latin fabricatio

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /fæbɹɪˈkeɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

fabrication (countable and uncountable, plural fabrications)

  1. (uncountable) The act of fabricating, framing, or constructing; construction; manufacture
    the fabrication of a bridge, a church, or a government
  2. (countable) That which is fabricated; a falsehood
    The story is doubtless a fabrication.
  3. (cooking) The act of cutting up an animal carcass as preparation for cooking; butchery.

Related terms

  • fabricate
  • fabricating
  • fabric

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fa.bʁi.ka.sjɔ̃/

Noun

fabrication f (plural fabrications)

  1. manufacture, manufacturing
  2. fabrication
  3. production


English

Etymology

From Middle English ficcioun, from Old French ficcion (dissimulation, ruse, invention), from Latin fictiō (a making, fashioning, a feigning, a rhetorical or legal fiction), from fingō (to form, mold, shape, devise, feign).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fĭk′-shən, IPA(key): /ˈfɪk.ʃən/
  • Hyphenation: fic‧tion
  • Rhymes: -ɪkʃən

Noun

fiction (countable and uncountable, plural fictions)

  1. Literary type using invented or imaginative writing, instead of real facts, usually written as prose.
  2. (uncountable) A verbal or written account that is not based on actual events (often intended to mislead).
  3. (law) A legal fiction.

Synonyms

  • fabrication
  • figment

Antonyms

  • documentary
  • fact
  • non-fiction
  • truth

Hypernyms

  • literary type

Hyponyms

  • science fiction
  • speculative fiction

Derived terms

  • fictitious
  • fictional
  • non-fiction

Related terms

  • fiction section

Descendants

  • Irish: ficsean
  • Scottish Gaelic: ficsean

Translations

Further reading

  • fiction in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fiction in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • fiction at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • “fiction” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 134.

French

Etymology

From Old French, borrowed from Latin fictionem (nominative of fictio).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fik.sjɔ̃/

Noun

fiction f (plural fictions)

  1. fiction

Related terms

  • fictif
  • science-fiction

Further reading

  • “fiction” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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