face vs present what difference

what is difference between face and present

English

Etymology

From Middle English face, from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (form, appearance).

Displaced native Middle English onlete (face, countenance, appearance), anleth (face), from Old English anwlite, andwlita, compare German Antlitz; Old English ansīen (face), Middle English neb (face, nose) (from Old English nebb), Middle English ler, leor, leer (face, cheek, countenance) (from Old English hlēor), and non-native Middle English vis (face, appearance, look) (from Old French vis) and Middle English chere (face) from Old French chere.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fās, IPA(key): /feɪs/
  • Hyphenation: face
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Noun

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) The front part of the head of a human or other animal, featuring the eyes, nose and mouth, and the surrounding area.
  2. One’s facial expression.
  3. (in expressions such as ‘make a face’) A distorted facial expression; an expression of displeasure, insult, etc.
  4. The public image; outward appearance.
  5. The frontal aspect of something.
  6. An aspect of the character or nature of someone or something.
  7. (figuratively) Presence; sight; front.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a bat he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  8. The directed force of something.
  9. Good reputation; standing in the eyes of others; dignity; prestige. (See lose face, save face).
  10. Shameless confidence; boldness; effrontery.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, Preface to The Works
      This is the man that has the face to charge others with false citations.
  11. Any surface, especially a front or outer one.
  12. (geometry) Any of the flat bounding surfaces of a polyhedron. More generally, any of the bounding pieces of a polytope of any dimension.
  13. The numbered dial of a clock or watch, the clock face.
  14. (slang) The mouth.
  15. (slang) Makeup; one’s complete facial cosmetic application.
  16. (metonymically) A person.
  17. (informal) A familiar or well-known person; a member of a particular scene, such as music or fashion scene.
  18. (professional wrestling, slang) A headlining wrestler with a persona embodying heroic or virtuous traits and who is regarded as a “good guy”, especially one who is handsome and well-conditioned; a baby face.
  19. (cricket) The front surface of a bat.
  20. (golf) The part of a golf club that hits the ball.
  21. (card games) The side of the card that shows its value (as opposed to the back side, which looks the same on all cards of the deck).
  22. (heraldry) The head of a lion, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.
  23. The width of a pulley, or the length of a cog from end to end.
  24. (typography) A typeface.
  25. Mode of regard, whether favourable or unfavourable; favour or anger.
  26. (informal) The amount expressed on a bill, note, bond, etc., without any interest or discount; face value.

Synonyms

  • (part of head): countenance, visage, phiz (obsolete), phizog (obsolete), see also Thesaurus:countenance
  • (facial expression): countenance, expression, facial expression, look, visage, see also Thesaurus:facial expression
  • (the front or outer surface): foreside
  • (public image): image, public image, reputation
  • (of a polyhedron): facet (different specialised meaning in mathematical use), surface (not in mathematical use)
  • (slang: mouth): cakehole, gob, mush, piehole, trap, see also Thesaurus:mouth
  • (slang: wrestling): good guy, hero

Antonyms

  • (baby face): heel

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Danish: fjæs
  • Norwegian: fjes
  • Swedish: fjäs

Translations

See face/translations § Noun.

Verb

face (third-person singular simple present faces, present participle facing, simple past and past participle faced)

  1. (transitive, of a person or animal) To position oneself or itself so as to have one’s face closest to (something).
  2. (transitive, of an object) To have its front closest to, or in the direction of (something else).
  3. (transitive) To cause (something) to turn or present a face or front, as in a particular direction.
    • 1963, Ian Fleming, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service
      The croupier delicately faced her other two cards with the tip of his spatula. A four! She had lost!
  4. (transitive) To be presented or confronted with; to have in prospect.
  5. (transitive) To deal with (a difficult situation or person); to accept (facts, reality, etc.) even when undesirable.
    • I’ll face / This tempest, and deserve the name of king.
  6. (intransitive) To have the front in a certain direction.
  7. (transitive) To have as an opponent.
  8. (intransitive, cricket) To be the batsman on strike.
  9. (transitive, obsolete) To confront impudently; to bully.
  10. (transitive) To cover in front, for ornament, protection, etc.; to put a facing upon.
  11. (transitive) To line near the edge, especially with a different material.
  12. To cover with better, or better appearing, material than the mass consists of, for purpose of deception, as the surface of a box of tea, a barrel of sugar, etc.
  13. (engineering) To make the surface of (anything) flat or smooth; to dress the face of (a stone, a casting, etc.); especially, in turning, to shape or smooth the flat surface of, as distinguished from the cylindrical surface.
  14. (transitive, retail) To arrange the products in (a store) so that they are tidy and attractive.

Synonyms

  • (position oneself/itself towards):
  • (have its front closest to):
  • (deal with): confront, deal with

Derived terms

  • in-your-face

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • Face on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (geometry) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (hieroglyph) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (mining) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (sociological concept) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Further reading

  • MathWorld article on geometrical faces
  • Faces in programming
  • JavaServer Faces
  • face on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

References

  • face on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • CAFE, cafe, café

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌˈħe/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ce

Verb

facé

  1. (transitive) boil

Conjugation

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[4], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 280

French

Etymology

From Middle French and Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fas/
  • Homophones: faces, fasce, fasse, fassent, fasses
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
  2. surface, side
  3. (geometry) face
  4. head (of a coin)

Derived terms

See also

  • aspect
  • figure
  • surface
  • tête
  • visage

Further reading

  • “face” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • café

Friulian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Noun

face f (plural facis)

  1. face

Interlingua

Verb

face

  1. present of facer
  2. imperative of facer

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -atʃe
  • Hyphenation: fà‧ce

Etymology 1

Learned borrowing from Latin facem, accusative of fax (torch, firebrand).

Noun

face f (plural faci)

  1. (poetic) torch
    Synonyms: fiaccola, torcia
  2. (poetic, transferred sense) light
    Synonyms: luce, lume, splendore
Related terms
  • faceto

References

  • face in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

face

  1. Archaic form of fa, third-person singular present indicative of fare

Latin

Noun

face

  1. ablative singular of fax

Verb

face

  1. second-person singular present imperative active of faciō

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Classical Latin faciēs.

Noun

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • 14th C., Chaucer, General Prologue
      Boold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe.

      Bold was her face, and fair, and red of hue.
Synonyms
  • visage
Descendants
  • English: face (see there for further descendants)
    • Northumbrian: fyess
  • Scots: face
  • Yola: faace
References
  • “fāce, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From Old English fæs.

Noun

face

  1. Alternative form of fass

Old French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Noun

face f (oblique plural faces, nominative singular face, nominative plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • c. 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      Le chief li desarme et la face.

      He exposed his head and his face.

Synonyms

  • vis (more common)
  • visage
  • volt

Descendants

  • Middle French: face
    • French: face
  • Norman: fache, fach
  • Middle English: face
    • English: face (see there for further descendants)
      • Northumbrian: fyess
    • Scots: face
    • Yola: faace

Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese façe, faz, from Latin faciēs.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈfa.sɨ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfa.si/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ce

Noun

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy, geometry) face
    Synonyms: cara, rosto
  2. (anatomy) the cheek
    Synonym: bochecha

References

  • “façe” in Dicionario de dicionarios do galego medieval.

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō, from Proto-Italic *fakiō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set). The verb’s original past participle was fapt, from factum, but was changed and replaced several centuries ago. An alternative third-person simple perfect, fece, from fecit, was also found in some dialects.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfat͡ʃe]

Verb

a face (third-person singular present face, past participle făcut3rd conj.

  1. (transitive) do, make
  2. (reflexive) to be made, to be done

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • afacere
  • facere
  • făcător

Related terms

  • desface
  • fapt

See also

  • înfăptui
  • face dragoste

References

  • face in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈfaθe/, [ˈfa.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈfase/, [ˈfa.se]

Verb

face

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of facer.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of facer.


English

Alternative forms

  • præsent (archaic or pedantic)
  • (abbreviation, grammar): ps.

Pronunciation

  • (adjective, noun)
    • enPR: prĕzʹənt, IPA(key): /ˈpɹɛzənt/
    • Hyphenation: pres‧ent
    • Rhymes: -ɛzənt
  • (verb)
    • enPR: prĭzĕnt’, IPA(key): /pɹɪˈzɛnt/
    • (Canada) IPA(key): /pɹəˈzɛnt/
    • ,
    • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Etymology 1

From Middle English present, from Old French present, from Latin praesent-, praesens present participle of praeesse (to be present), from Latin prae- (pre-) + esse (to be).

Adjective

present (comparative more present, superlative most present)

  1. Relating to now, for the time being; current.
    Up to the present day.
  2. Located in the immediate vicinity.
  3. (obsolete) Having an immediate effect (of a medicine, poison etc.); fast-acting. [16th-18th c.]
    • Amongſt this number of Cordials and Alteratiues, J doe not find a more preſent remedy, then a cup of wine, or ſtrong drinke, and if it be ſoberly and opportunely vſed.
  4. (obsolete) Not delayed; immediate; instant.
    • 1636, Philip Massinger, The Bashful Lover
      An ambassador [] desires a present audience.
  5. (dated) Ready; quick in emergency.
  6. (obsolete) Favorably attentive; propitious.
    • to find a god so present to my prayer
  7. Relating to something a person is referring to in the very context, with a deictic use similar to the demonstrative adjective this.
  8. Attentive; alert; focused.
Synonyms
  • (relating to now): current; see also Thesaurus:present
  • (in vicinity): close, nearby; see also Thesaurus:near
  • (having an immediate effect): presentaneous
  • (not delayed): instantaneous; see also Thesaurus:instantaneous
  • (attentive): audient, heedful, reckful
Antonyms
  • (relating to now): future, past
  • (in vicinity): absent
  • (having an immediate effect): slow-acting
  • (not delayed): delayed; see also Thesaurus:delayed
  • (attentive): distracted, inattentive
Derived terms
Related terms
  • presence
Translations

Noun

present (plural presents)

  1. The current moment or period of time.
  2. The present tense.
Synonyms
  • (current time): now; see also Thesaurus:the present
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English presenten, from Old French presenter, from Latin praesentāre (to show), from praesent-, praesens, present participle of praeesse (be in front of).

Noun

present (plural presents)

  1. A gift, especially one given for birthdays, Christmas, anniversaries, graduations, weddings, or any other special occasions.
  2. (military) The position of a soldier in presenting arms.
Descendants
  • Japanese: プレゼント (purezento)
Translations

Verb

present (third-person singular simple present presents, present participle presenting, simple past and past participle presented)

  1. To bring (someone) into the presence of (a person); to introduce formally. [from 14th c.]
    to present an envoy to the king
  2. (transitive) To nominate (a member of the clergy) for an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive) To offer (a problem, complaint) to a court or other authority for consideration. [from 14th c.]
  4. (transitive, now rare) To charge (a person) with a crime or accusation; to bring before court. [from 14th c.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, page 71:
      In the diocese of Gloucester in 1548 two inhabitants of Slimbridge were presented for saying that holy oil was ‘of no virtue but meet to grease sheep’.
  5. (reflexive) To come forward, appear in a particular place or before a particular person, especially formally. [from 14th c.]
  6. (transitive) To put (something) forward in order for it to be seen; to show, exhibit. [from 14th c.]
    • 2020, NFL rule 7 section 4 article 7[1]:
      Note: The offensive team must present a legal formation both before and after a shift.
  7. (transitive) To make clear to one’s mind or intelligence; to put forward for consideration. [from 14th c.]
    • 1927, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Case-book of Sherlock Holmes:
      I do begin to realize that the matter must be presented in such a way as may interest the reader.
  8. (transitive) To put on, stage (a play etc.). [from 16th c.]
    The theater is proud to present the Fearless Fliers.
  9. (transitive, military) To point (a firearm) at something, to hold (a weapon) in a position ready to fire. [from 16th c.]
  10. (reflexive) To offer oneself for mental consideration; to occur to the mind. [from 16th c.]
    Well, one idea does present itself.
  11. (intransitive, medicine) To come to the attention of medical staff, especially with a specific symptom. [from 19th c.]
    The patient presented with insomnia.
  12. (intransitive, medicine) To appear (in a specific way) for delivery (of a fetus); to appear first at the mouth of the uterus during childbirth. [from 18th c.]
  13. (intransitive, with “as”) To appear or represent oneself (as having a certain gender).
    At that time, Elbe was presenting as a man.
  14. (transitive) To act as presenter on (a radio, television programme etc.). [from 20th c.]
    Anne Robinson presents “The Weakest Link”.
  15. (transitive) To give a gift or presentation to (someone). [from 14th c.]
    She was presented with an honorary degree for her services to entertainment.
  16. (transitive) To give (a gift or presentation) to someone; to bestow. [from 14th c.]
    • 1801, William Cowper, The Vicissitudes Experienced in the Christian Life
      My last, least offering, I present thee now.
  17. (transitive) To deliver (something abstract) as though as a gift; to offer. [from 14th c.]
    I presented my compliments to Lady Featherstoneshaw.
  18. (transitive) To hand over (a bill etc.) to be paid. [from 15th c.]
  19. (intransitive, zoology) To display one’s female genitalia in a way that signals to others that one is ready for copulation. Also referred to as lordosis behaviour. [from 20th c.]
Derived terms
  • present arms
Translations

Further reading

  • present in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • present in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • present at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Serpent, penster, repents, respent, serpent

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin praesens, attested from the 13th century.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /pɾəˈzent/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /pɾəˈzen/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /pɾeˈzent/

Noun

present m (plural presents)

  1. present (current moment or period of time)
  2. (grammar) present (grammatical tense)

Adjective

present (masculine and feminine plural presents)

  1. present (at a given location)

Derived terms

  • tenir present

References

Further reading

  • “present” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “present” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “present” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Etymology

From French présent, from présenter (to present).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /prɛsanɡ/, [pʰʁ̥ɛˈsɑŋ]

Noun

present c (singular definite presenten, plural indefinite presenter)

  1. (dated) present, gift
    Synonym: gave

Inflection


Ladin

Alternative forms

  • prejent, presënt

Adjective

present m (feminine singular presenta, masculine plural presenc, feminine plural presentes)

  1. present

Middle French

Noun

present m (plural presens)

  1. gift; present
    • 1417, La disputation de l’Asne contre frere Anselme Turmeda [3]
      Un iour qu’il alloit par ladite cité & passant p[ar] la rue de la mer, veit une guenon dedans un panier & l’acheta pour en faire un present audit conte d’Armignac son parent, pource que en France i’a pas beaucoup de telz animaux.

      One day as he was walking through said city and passing through la Rue de Mer, he saw an Old World monkey in a basket and bought it to give it as a present to the Count of Armignac, his father, because there are not many animals like this one in France.
  2. (grammar) present (tense)

Old French

Noun

present m (oblique plural presenz or presentz, nominative singular presenz or presentz, nominative plural present)

  1. gift; present
  2. (grammar) present (tense)

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /preˈsent/

Noun

present c

  1. gift, present

Declension

Synonyms

  • gåva, klapp

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