face vs side what difference

what is difference between face and side

English

Etymology

From Middle English face, from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (form, appearance).

Displaced native Middle English onlete (face, countenance, appearance), anleth (face), from Old English anwlite, andwlita, compare German Antlitz; Old English ansīen (face), Middle English neb (face, nose) (from Old English nebb), Middle English ler, leor, leer (face, cheek, countenance) (from Old English hlēor), and non-native Middle English vis (face, appearance, look) (from Old French vis) and Middle English chere (face) from Old French chere.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fās, IPA(key): /feɪs/
  • Hyphenation: face
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Noun

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) The front part of the head of a human or other animal, featuring the eyes, nose and mouth, and the surrounding area.
  2. One’s facial expression.
  3. (in expressions such as ‘make a face’) A distorted facial expression; an expression of displeasure, insult, etc.
  4. The public image; outward appearance.
  5. The frontal aspect of something.
  6. An aspect of the character or nature of someone or something.
  7. (figuratively) Presence; sight; front.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a bat he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  8. The directed force of something.
  9. Good reputation; standing in the eyes of others; dignity; prestige. (See lose face, save face).
  10. Shameless confidence; boldness; effrontery.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, Preface to The Works
      This is the man that has the face to charge others with false citations.
  11. Any surface, especially a front or outer one.
  12. (geometry) Any of the flat bounding surfaces of a polyhedron. More generally, any of the bounding pieces of a polytope of any dimension.
  13. The numbered dial of a clock or watch, the clock face.
  14. (slang) The mouth.
  15. (slang) Makeup; one’s complete facial cosmetic application.
  16. (metonymically) A person.
  17. (informal) A familiar or well-known person; a member of a particular scene, such as music or fashion scene.
  18. (professional wrestling, slang) A headlining wrestler with a persona embodying heroic or virtuous traits and who is regarded as a “good guy”, especially one who is handsome and well-conditioned; a baby face.
  19. (cricket) The front surface of a bat.
  20. (golf) The part of a golf club that hits the ball.
  21. (card games) The side of the card that shows its value (as opposed to the back side, which looks the same on all cards of the deck).
  22. (heraldry) The head of a lion, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.
  23. The width of a pulley, or the length of a cog from end to end.
  24. (typography) A typeface.
  25. Mode of regard, whether favourable or unfavourable; favour or anger.
  26. (informal) The amount expressed on a bill, note, bond, etc., without any interest or discount; face value.

Synonyms

  • (part of head): countenance, visage, phiz (obsolete), phizog (obsolete), see also Thesaurus:countenance
  • (facial expression): countenance, expression, facial expression, look, visage, see also Thesaurus:facial expression
  • (the front or outer surface): foreside
  • (public image): image, public image, reputation
  • (of a polyhedron): facet (different specialised meaning in mathematical use), surface (not in mathematical use)
  • (slang: mouth): cakehole, gob, mush, piehole, trap, see also Thesaurus:mouth
  • (slang: wrestling): good guy, hero

Antonyms

  • (baby face): heel

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Danish: fjæs
  • Norwegian: fjes
  • Swedish: fjäs

Translations

See face/translations § Noun.

Verb

face (third-person singular simple present faces, present participle facing, simple past and past participle faced)

  1. (transitive, of a person or animal) To position oneself or itself so as to have one’s face closest to (something).
  2. (transitive, of an object) To have its front closest to, or in the direction of (something else).
  3. (transitive) To cause (something) to turn or present a face or front, as in a particular direction.
    • 1963, Ian Fleming, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service
      The croupier delicately faced her other two cards with the tip of his spatula. A four! She had lost!
  4. (transitive) To be presented or confronted with; to have in prospect.
  5. (transitive) To deal with (a difficult situation or person); to accept (facts, reality, etc.) even when undesirable.
    • I’ll face / This tempest, and deserve the name of king.
  6. (intransitive) To have the front in a certain direction.
  7. (transitive) To have as an opponent.
  8. (intransitive, cricket) To be the batsman on strike.
  9. (transitive, obsolete) To confront impudently; to bully.
  10. (transitive) To cover in front, for ornament, protection, etc.; to put a facing upon.
  11. (transitive) To line near the edge, especially with a different material.
  12. To cover with better, or better appearing, material than the mass consists of, for purpose of deception, as the surface of a box of tea, a barrel of sugar, etc.
  13. (engineering) To make the surface of (anything) flat or smooth; to dress the face of (a stone, a casting, etc.); especially, in turning, to shape or smooth the flat surface of, as distinguished from the cylindrical surface.
  14. (transitive, retail) To arrange the products in (a store) so that they are tidy and attractive.

Synonyms

  • (position oneself/itself towards):
  • (have its front closest to):
  • (deal with): confront, deal with

Derived terms

  • in-your-face

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • Face on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (geometry) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (hieroglyph) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (mining) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (sociological concept) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Further reading

  • MathWorld article on geometrical faces
  • Faces in programming
  • JavaServer Faces
  • face on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

References

  • face on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • CAFE, cafe, café

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌˈħe/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ce

Verb

facé

  1. (transitive) boil

Conjugation

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[4], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 280

French

Etymology

From Middle French and Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fas/
  • Homophones: faces, fasce, fasse, fassent, fasses
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
  2. surface, side
  3. (geometry) face
  4. head (of a coin)

Derived terms

See also

  • aspect
  • figure
  • surface
  • tête
  • visage

Further reading

  • “face” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • café

Friulian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Noun

face f (plural facis)

  1. face

Interlingua

Verb

face

  1. present of facer
  2. imperative of facer

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.t͡ʃe/
  • Rhymes: -atʃe
  • Hyphenation: fà‧ce

Etymology 1

Learned borrowing from Latin facem, accusative of fax (torch, firebrand).

Noun

face f (plural faci)

  1. (poetic) torch
    Synonyms: fiaccola, torcia
  2. (poetic, transferred sense) light
    Synonyms: luce, lume, splendore
Related terms
  • faceto

References

  • face in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

face

  1. Archaic form of fa, third-person singular present indicative of fare

Latin

Noun

face

  1. ablative singular of fax

Verb

face

  1. second-person singular present imperative active of faciō

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Classical Latin faciēs.

Noun

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • 14th C., Chaucer, General Prologue
      Boold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe.

      Bold was her face, and fair, and red of hue.
Synonyms
  • visage
Descendants
  • English: face (see there for further descendants)
    • Northumbrian: fyess
  • Scots: face
  • Yola: faace
References
  • “fāce, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

From Old English fæs.

Noun

face

  1. Alternative form of fass

Old French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Noun

face f (oblique plural faces, nominative singular face, nominative plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • c. 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      Le chief li desarme et la face.

      He exposed his head and his face.

Synonyms

  • vis (more common)
  • visage
  • volt

Descendants

  • Middle French: face
    • French: face
  • Norman: fache, fach
  • Middle English: face
    • English: face (see there for further descendants)
      • Northumbrian: fyess
    • Scots: face
    • Yola: faace

Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese façe, faz, from Latin faciēs.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈfa.sɨ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfa.si/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ce

Noun

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy, geometry) face
    Synonyms: cara, rosto
  2. (anatomy) the cheek
    Synonym: bochecha

References

  • “façe” in Dicionario de dicionarios do galego medieval.

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō, from Proto-Italic *fakiō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set). The verb’s original past participle was fapt, from factum, but was changed and replaced several centuries ago. An alternative third-person simple perfect, fece, from fecit, was also found in some dialects.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfat͡ʃe]

Verb

a face (third-person singular present face, past participle făcut3rd conj.

  1. (transitive) do, make
  2. (reflexive) to be made, to be done

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • afacere
  • facere
  • făcător

Related terms

  • desface
  • fapt

See also

  • înfăptui
  • face dragoste

References

  • face in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈfaθe/, [ˈfa.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈfase/, [ˈfa.se]

Verb

face

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of facer.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of facer.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sīd, IPA(key): /saɪd/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /səɪd/
  • Hyphenation: side
  • Rhymes: -aɪd
  • Homophone: sighed (except Scotland)

Etymology 1

From Middle English side, from Old English sīde (side, flank), from Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ (side, flank, edge, shore), from Proto-Indo-European *sēy- (to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Siede (side), West Frisian side (side), Dutch zijde, zij (side), German Low German Sied (side), German Seite (side), Danish and Norwegian side (side), Swedish sida (side).

Noun

side (countable and uncountable, plural sides)

  1. A bounding straight edge of a two-dimensional shape.
  2. A flat surface of a three-dimensional object; a face.
  3. One half (left or right, top or bottom, front or back, etc.) of something or someone.
  4. A region in a specified position with respect to something.
  5. The portion of the human torso usually covered by the arms when they are not raised; the areas on the left and right between the belly or chest and the back.
    • 2006, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured (Jones & Bartlett Learning, →ISBN, p. 234:
      Roll the patient onto the left side so that head, shoulders, and torso move at the same time without twisting.
  6. One surface of a sheet of paper (used instead of “page”, which can mean one or both surfaces.)
  7. One possible aspect of a concept, person or thing.
  8. One set of competitors in a game.
  9. (Britain, Australia, Ireland) A sports team.
    • 2011, Nick Cain, Greg Growden, Rugby Union For Dummies, UK Edition, 3rd Edition, p.220:
      Initially, the English, Welsh, Scots and Irish unions refused to send national sides, preferring instead to send touring sides like the Barbarians, the Penguins, the Co-Optimists, the Wolfhounds, Crawshays Welsh, and the Public School Wanderers.
  10. A group of morris dancers who perform together.
  11. A group having a particular allegiance in a conflict or competition.
    • 2019, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      “Creating artificial rain over the Yellow Sea would help the Chinese side too,” the spokesman said Kim told the meeting.

    • 1824, Walter Savage Landor, Imaginary Conversations, Lord Chesterfield and Lord Chatham
      We have not always been of the [] same side in politics.
    • sets the passions on the side of truth
  12. (music) A recorded piece of music; a record, especially in jazz.
    • 1995, James Lincoln Collier, Jazz: The American Theme Song, p. 41
      But Bechet chafed under even the loose discipline of the Ellington group, and left. Through these years he wandered, making only a few sides, at the moment when jazz records were beginning to flood onto the market.
  13. (sports, billiards, snooker, pool) Sidespin; english
  14. (Britain, Australia, Ireland, dated) A television channel, usually as opposed to the one currently being watched (from when there were only two channels).
  15. (US, colloquial) A dish that accompanies the main course; a side dish.
  16. A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
  17. (baseball) The batters faced in an inning by a particular pitcher
    Clayton Kershaw struck out the side in the 6th inning.
  18. (slang, dated, uncountable) An unjustified air of self-importance.
  19. (drama) A written monologue or part of a scene to be read by an actor at an audition.
    • 2010, Viola Spolin, ‎Carol Sills, Theater Games for Rehearsal: A Director’s Handbook (page 12)
      Some directors use full scripts (book); others use “sides,” which consist of one or two words of the cue and the subsequent full speech of the individual actor.
  20. (LGBT, slang) A man who prefers not to engage in anal sex during homosexual intercourse.
    My boyfriend and I are both sides, so we prefer to do oral on each other.
Synonyms
  • (bounding straight edge of an object): edge
  • (flat surface of an object): face
  • (left or right half): half
  • (surface of a sheet of paper): page
  • (region in a specified position with respect to something):
  • (one possible aspect of a concept):
  • (set of opponents in a game): team
  • (group having a particular allegiance in a war):
  • (television channel): channel, station (US)
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • English words suffixed with -side
  • Related terms
    Translations

    Adjective

    side (comparative more side, superlative most side)

    1. Being on the left or right, or toward the left or right; lateral.
      • One mighty squadron with a side wind sped.
    2. Indirect; oblique; incidental.
      a side issue; a side view or remark
      • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
        The law hath no side respect to their persons.

    Verb

    side (third-person singular simple present sides, present participle siding, simple past and past participle sided)

    1. (intransitive) To ally oneself, be in an alliance, usually with “with” or rarely “in with”
      Which will you side with, good or evil?
      • 1597, Francis Bacon, Essays – “Of Great Place”:
        All rising to great place is by a winding star; and if there be factions, it is good to side a man’s self, whilst he is in the rising, and to balance himself when he is placed.
      • 1958, Archer Fullingim, The Kountze [Texas] News, August 28, 1958:
        How does it feel… to… side in with those who voted against you in 1947?
    2. To lean on one side.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
    3. (transitive, obsolete) To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
    4. (transitive, obsolete) To suit; to pair; to match.
      • 1660-1667, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, The Life of Edward Earl of Clarendon
        He had ſure read more , and carried more about him , in his excellent Memory , than any Man I ever knew , my Lord Falkland only excepted , who I think ſided him
    5. (transitive, shipbuilding) To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
    6. (transitive) To furnish with a siding.
    7. (transitive, cooking) To provide with, as a side or accompaniment.
      • 1995, Orange Coast Magazine (volume 11, number 8, page 166)
        Entrees are sided with a generous portion of vegetables, and some include little surprises []
    Synonyms
    • (ally oneself):
    • take side
    Derived terms
    • side with
    • siding
    Translations
    See also
    • ally
    • alliance
    • join in

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English side, syde, syd, from Old English sīd (wide, broad, spacious, ample, extensive, vast, far-reaching), from Proto-Germanic *sīdaz (drooping, hanging, low, excessive, extra), from Proto-Indo-European *sēy- (to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit). Cognate with Low German sied (low), Swedish sid (long, hanging down), Icelandic síður (low hanging, long).

    Adjective

    side (comparative more side, superlative most side)

    1. (Britain archaic, dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.
      • c. 1556, Thomas Cranmer, A Confutation of Unwritten Verities, “That the general counsels withoute the worde of god are not sufficiente to make articles of fayth,”[2]
        But when he perceaved that the sayd Pryest could not pourge himself of the foresayd crime he prively payed him his quarters wages before hande and suffered hym to departe without farther tryall of the sayd cryme: and now he jetteth in london wyth side gown and sarcenet typet as good a virgin priest as the best.
      • 1575, Robert Laneham, Robert Laneham’s Letter: Describing a Part of the Entertainment unto Queen Elizabeth at the Castle of Kenelworth in 1575, edited by F. J. Furnivall, London: Chatto & Windus, 1907, “The auncient Minstrell described,” p. 38,[3]
        Hiz gooun had syde sleeuez dooun to midlegge, slit from the shooulder too the hand, & lined with white cotten.
      • 1595, George Peele, The Old Wives’ Tale, The Malone Society Reprints, 1908, lines 47-50,[4]
        What doe we make dost thou aske? why we make faces for feare: such as if thy mortall eyes could behold, would make thee water the long seames of thy side slops []
      • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, Act III, Scene 4,[5]
        By my troth, ’s but a night-gown in respect of yours: cloth o’ gold, and cuts, and laced with silver, set with pearls, down sleeves, side sleeves, and skirts, round underborne with a bluish tinsel []
    2. (Scotland) Far; distant.
    Derived terms
    • sidth

    Adverb

    side (comparative more side, superlative most side)

    1. (Britain dialectal) Widely; wide; far.

    Verb

    side (third-person singular simple present sides, present participle siding, simple past and past participle sided)

    1. To clear, tidy or sort.

    Anagrams

    • Desi, Dies, EIDs, Eids, IDEs, IEDs, Ides, SEID, deis, desi, dies, eids, ides, sied

    Danish

    Etymology

    From Old Norse síða.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈsiːdə/, [ˈs̺iːð̩˕˗ˠ]
    • Rhymes: -iːdə

    Noun

    side c (singular definite siden, plural indefinite sider)

    1. page

    Declension

    Further reading

    • “side” in Den Danske Ordbog
    • “side” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog

    Estonian

    Etymology

    From Proto-Finnic *sidek. Equivalent to siduma +‎ -e.

    Noun

    side (genitive sideme, partitive sidet)

    1. bond, binding
    2. bandage
    3. relationship, tie

    Inflection

    Compounds

    • kaelaside

    Noun

    side (genitive side, partitive sidet)

    1. communication (especially one achieved through technology)
    2. signal (especially in radio)
    3. communications (as a field)
    4. (colloquial) post office

    Inflection

    Compounds

    • otseside

    Finnish

    Etymology

    From Proto-Finnic *sidek. Equivalent to sitoa +‎ -e.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈsideˣ/, [ˈs̠ide̞(ʔ)]
    • Rhymes: -ide
    • Syllabification: si‧de

    Noun

    side

    1. bandage
    2. bond
    3. sanitary towel
    4. (anatomy) ligament

    Declension

    Synonyms

    • (sanitary towel): terveysside
    • (ligament): ligamentti

    Derived terms

    Related terms

    • sidos

    Anagrams

    • desi, desi-

    Latin

    Verb

    sīde

    1. second-person singular present active imperative of sīdō

    Manx

    Etymology

    From Old Irish saiget, from Latin sagitta.

    Noun

    side f (genitive singular sidey, plural sideyn)

    1. arrow, bolt, shaft

    Related terms

    • fleit
    • sideyr (archer)

    Mutation

    References

    • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “saiget”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

    Middle English

    Etymology 1

    From Old English sīde.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈsiːd(ə)/

    Noun

    side

    1. side
    Descendants
    • English: side
    • Scots: side, syde
    • Yola: zeide

    References

    • “sīde, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    side

    1. Alternative form of seed (seed)

    Middle Irish

    Etymology

    From Old Irish síd, from Proto-Celtic *sedos, *sīdos (mound (inhabited by fairies)), from Proto-Indo-European *sēds, *sed- (seat).

    Noun

    side m

    1. fairy hill or mound

    Derived terms

    Descendants

    • Irish:

    Mutation

    References

    • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 síd, síth”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

    Norwegian Bokmål

    Etymology

    From Old Norse síða.

    Noun

    side f or m (definite singular sida or siden, indefinite plural sider, definite plural sidene)

    1. a page (e.g. in a book)
    2. side
    3. (of a case) aspect
    4. (on animal) flank

    Derived terms


    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /²siː(d)ə/ (examples of pronunciation)

    Etymology 1

    From Old Norse síða. Akin to English side.

    Noun

    side f (definite singular sida, indefinite plural sider, definite plural sidene)

    1. a page (e.g. in a book)
    2. a side (various, though not all senses)
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    Adjective

    side

    1. definite singular of sid
    2. plural of sid

    References

    • “side” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

    Anagrams

    • deis, desi-, dise, seid

    Old English

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈsiː.de/

    Etymology 1

    From the adjective sīd.

    Adverb

    sīde

    1. widely

    Etymology 2

    From Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ, whence also Old High German sīta

    Noun

    sīde f

    1. side

    Declension

    Etymology 3

    Borrowed from Late Latin sēta, whence also Old High German sīda (silk).

    Noun

    sīde f (nominative plural sīdan)

    1. silk
    Synonyms
    • seolc

    Old Irish

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈsʲiðʲe/

    Pronoun

    side

    1. inflection of suide:
      1. nominative/accusative singular masculine unstressed
      2. genitive singular feminine unstressed

    Mutation


    West Frisian

    Etymology

    From Old Frisian sīde, from Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈsidə/

    Noun

    side c (plural siden, diminutive sydsje)

    1. side
    2. page

    Derived terms

    • webside

    Further reading

    • “side (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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