facia vs fascia what difference

what is difference between facia and fascia

English

Noun

facia (plural facias)

  1. Alternative form of fascia

Anagrams

  • AFAIC

Turkish

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish فاجعه‎, from Arabic فَاجِعَة(fājiʿa). Compare Azerbaijani faciə.

Noun

facia (definite accusative faciayı, plural facialar)

  1. catastrophe, tragedy

References

  • Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–), “facia”, in Nişanyan Sözlük
  • Redhouse, James W. (1890), “فاجع”, in A Turkish and English Lexicon, Constantinople: A. H. Boyajian, page 1358
  • The Redhouse Dictionary Turkish/Ottoman English, 21st edition, 2013, →ISBN


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fascia (a band, bandage, swathe). Related to fascēs (bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade projecting), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰask- (bundle, band). Doublet of fajita, fess, and fascism.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfæʃə/, /ˈfæʃjə/, /ˈfæʃi.ə/
  • IPA(key): /ˈfeɪʃə/, /ˈfeɪʃjə/, /ˈfeɪʃi.ə/ (especially sense 1)
  • Rhymes: -æʃə

Noun

fascia (plural fascias or fasciae)

  1. (architecture) A wide band of material covering the ends of roof rafters, sometimes supporting a gutter in steep-slope roofing, but typically it is a border or trim in low-slope roofing.
    Synonym: frieze
  2. A face or front cover of an appliance, especially of a mobile phone.
    Synonym: case
  3. (Britain) A dashboard.
    Synonym: dashboard
  4. (architecture) A flat band or broad fillet; especially, one of the three bands that make up the architrave, in the Ionic order.
  5. A broad well-defined band of color.
  6. A band, sash, or fillet; especially, in surgery, a bandage or roller.
  7. (ecclesiastical, fashion) A sash worn by certain members of the Catholic and Anglican churches.
    Synonym: sash
  8. (anatomy) The layer of loose tissue, often containing fat, immediately beneath the skin; the stronger layer of connective tissue covering and investing all muscles; an aponeurosis.
  9. The signboard above a shop or other location open to the public.

Derived terms

  • fascial

Translations

Usage notes

The plural fascias is used for the first five definitions while fasciae is used for the sixth.

Anagrams

  • AFAICS, facias

Italian

Etymology

From Latin fascia. Compare Spanish faja, Portuguese faixa, Romanian fașă.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaʃ.ʃa/
  • Hyphenation: fà‧scia
  • Rhymes: -aʃʃa

Noun

fascia f (plural fasce)

  1. strip, band
  2. bandage
  3. sash
  4. (geography) belt
  5. (heraldry) fess

See also

  • bandana

Anagrams

  • Caifas, fiasca, scafai

Latin

Etymology

See fascis.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfas.ki.a/, [ˈfäs̠kiä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfa.ʃi.a/, [ˈfɑːʃiɑ]

Noun

fascia f (genitive fasciae); first declension

  1. band, bandage, swathe, strip, ribbon
  2. (New Latin) necktie
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling (Translation by Peter Needham), Harrius Potter et Philosophi Lapis, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, London, page 2:
      Dominus Dursley bombiebat dum fasciam hebetissimi coloris eligebat idoneam ad negotia gerenda

Declension

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • fasciō
  • fasciola

Descendants

  • Eastern Romance:
    • Aromanian: fashi, fashe
    • Istro-Romanian: foşă
    • Romanian: fașă, fâșie
  • Istriot: fasa
  • Italian: fascia
  • Navarro-Aragonese:
    • Aragonese: faxa
      • Spanish: faja
  • Old French: faisse, fece
    • French: fasce (re-Latinized)
    • English: fess
    • Dutch: faas
  • Old Leonese:
    • Asturian: faxa, facha, faza
  • Old Occitan:
    • Catalan: faixa
    • Occitan: faissa
  • Old Portuguese:
    • Galician: faixa
    • Portuguese: faixa
  • Old Spanish:
    • Spanish: haza
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
    • Friulian: fasse
  • Sardinian: fàsca, fàscia, fassa
  • Venetian: fasa
    • Cimbrian: béesa
  • Albanian: fashë
  • Gothic: ???????????????????????? (faskja)
  • Koine Greek: φασκία (phaskía)
    • Greek: φασκιά (faskiá)
  • Spanish: fascia

References

  • fascia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fascia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fascia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fascia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • fascia in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • fascia in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fascia in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fascia. Doublet of faja and haza.

Noun

fascia f (plural fascias)

  1. (anatomy) fascia (a layer of loose tissue)

Further reading

  • “fascia” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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