factory vs mill what difference

what is difference between factory and mill

English

Etymology

From Latin factorium (place of doers, makers). Equivalent to factor +‎ -y. Compare Middle French factorie; Italian fattoria, Spanish factoría, Portuguese feitoria, Dutch factorij.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈfæktəɹi/, /ˈfæktɹi/
  • (UK)

Noun

factory (plural factories)

  1. (chiefly Scotland, now rare) The position or state of being a factor. [from 16th c.]
  2. (now historical) A trading establishment, especially set up by merchants working in a foreign country. [from 16th c.]
    • 1792, James Boswell, in Danziger & Brady (eds.), Boswell: The Great Biographer (Journals 1789–1795), Yale 1989, p. 184:
      We had here his curate, Mr. Furley, who had been nine years chaplain to the English factory at St. Petersburg [] .
  3. A building or other place where manufacturing takes place. [from 17th c.]
    Synonym: manufactory
  4. (Britain, slang) A police station. [from 19th c.]
    • 2010, Harry Keeble, Kris Hollington, Crack House
      The guys all knew each other and we were having a jolly old chinwag as we marched them out of the house in front of their stunned neighbours and into a van we had called to take them all to the Factory (police station).
  5. A device which produces or manufactures something.
  6. A factory farm.
    chicken factory; pig factory
  7. (programming) In a computer program or library, a function, method, etc. which creates an object.
    • 2010, Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi, William Bartholomew, Inside the Microsoft Build Engine
      The task factory [] is the object that is responsible for creating instances of those tasks dynamically.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Tok Pisin: faktori
  • Welsh: ffatri

Translations

Further reading

  • factory in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • factory in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Adjective

factory (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial, of a configuration, part, etc.) Having come from the factory in the state it is currently in; original, stock.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: mĭl, IPA(key): /mɪl/, [mɪɫ]
  • Rhymes: -ɪl
  • Homophone: mil

Etymology 1

From Middle English mille, milne, from Old English mylen, from Proto-Germanic *mulīnō or *mulīnaz (mill), from Late Latin molīnum or molīnus (mill), from Latin molō (grind, mill, verb), closely allied to Proto-Germanic *muljaną (to crush, grind) (see English millstone). Perhaps cognate with Milne (a surname). Doublet of moulin.

Noun

mill (plural mills)

  1. A grinding apparatus for substances such as grains, seeds, etc.
  2. The building housing such a grinding apparatus.
  3. A machine used for expelling the juice, sap, etc., from vegetable tissues by pressure, or by pressure in combination with a grinding, or cutting process.
  4. A machine for grinding and polishing.
  5. The raised or ridged edge or surface made in milling anything, such as a coin or screw.
  6. A manufacturing plant for paper, steel, textiles, etc.
  7. A building housing such a plant.
  8. (figuratively) An establishment that handles a certain type of situation or procedure routinely, or produces large quantities of an item without much regard to quality, such as a divorce mill, a puppy mill, etc.
  9. (figuratively, derogatory) An institution awarding educational certificates not officially recognised
  10. (informal) An engine.
  11. (informal) A boxing match, fistfight.
  12. (die sinking) A hardened steel roller with a design in relief, used for imprinting a reversed copy of the design in a softer metal, such as copper.
  13. (mining) An excavation in rock, transverse to the workings, from which material for filling is obtained.
  14. (mining) A passage underground through which ore is shot.
  15. A milling cutter.
  16. (historical) A prison treadmill.
    • 1837, James Williams, A Narrative of Events Since the First of August, 1834 (page 9)
      Next morning they put me on the treadmill along with the others: At first, not knowing how to dance it, I cut all my shin with the steps; they did not flog me then — [] They keep on putting her on the mill for a week, and flog her every time []
  17. (CB radio slang) A typewriter used to transcribe messages received.
    • 1941, QST (volume 25, issues 2-6, page 90)
      In other words, get a mill in your operating position by hook or crook and use it regularly. At the N.C.R. Radio Schools touch typing is taught at the same time code proficiency is advanced.
    • 1986, Ham Radio Magazine (volume 19, page 66)
      You can read it all right, but the pencil seems to be getting a little sluggish — better make a grab for a “mill.”
Synonyms
  • (plant, building): factory, works
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: miri
  • Hindi: मिल (mil)
Translations

Verb

mill (third-person singular simple present mills, present participle milling, simple past and past participle milled)

  1. (transitive) To grind or otherwise process in a mill or other machine.
  2. (transitive) To shape, polish, dress or finish using a machine.
  3. (transitive) To engrave one or more grooves or a pattern around the edge of (a cylindrical object such as a coin).
  4. (intransitive, followed by around, about, etc.) To move about in an aimless fashion.
  5. (transitive) To cause to mill, or circle around.
  6. (zoology, of air-breathing creatures) To swim underwater.
  7. (zoology, of a whale) To swim suddenly in a new direction.
  8. (transitive, slang) To beat; to pound.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, The Madness of Private Ortheris
      Ortheris said nothing for a while. Then he unslung his belt, heavy with the badges of half a dozen regiments that his own had lain with, and handed it over to Mulvaney.
      “I’m too little for to mill you, Mulvaney,” said he, “an’ you’ve strook me before; but you can take an’ cut me in two with this ‘ere if you like.”
    • 1862, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Adventures of Philip
      [] he had “milled” a policeman
  9. To pass through a fulling mill; to full, as cloth.
  10. (transitive) To roll (steel, etc.) into bars.
  11. (transitive) To make (drinking chocolate) frothy, as by churning.
  12. (intransitive) To undergo hulling.
  13. (intransitive, slang) To take part in a fistfight; to box.
  14. (transitive, mining) To fill (a winze or interior incline) with broken ore, to be drawn out at the bottom.
  15. (obsolete, Britain, thieves’ cant) To commit burglary.
Synonyms
  • (move about in an aimless fashion): roam, wander
Derived terms
  • millable
  • nonmilled
  • unmilled
Translations

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Latin millesimum.

Noun

mill (plural mills)

  1. An obsolete coin worth one thousandth of a US dollar, or one tenth of a cent.
  2. One thousandth part, particularly in millage rates of property tax.
Synonyms
  • (one thousandth part): permille, ,
Coordinate terms
  • (one thousandth part):
  • percent
  • basis point
Derived terms
  • millage
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

mill (plural mill)

  1. (informal) Alternative form of mil (million)

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

mill (plural mills)

  1. A line of three matching pieces in nine men’s morris and related games.

Etymology 5

Back-formation from millstone, name of a Magic: The Gathering card with this effect (first printed 1994).

Alternative forms

  • Mill (in the sense of “a strategy”)

Verb

mill (third-person singular simple present mills, present participle milling, simple past and past participle milled)

  1. (transitive, collectible card games) To move (a card) from a deck to the discard pile.
  2. (transitive, Hearthstone) To destroy (a card) due to having a full hand.
Synonyms
  • (Hearthstone): burn
Derived terms
  • self-mill

Noun

mill (countable and uncountable, plural mills)

  1. (collectible card games) Discarding a card from one’s deck.
  2. (collectible card games) A strategy centered on depleting the opponent’s deck.
Derived terms
  • Mill Rogue
Translations

References

  • mill in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • mill in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Further reading

  • mill on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Mill in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Albanian

Etymology

Possibly from Proto-Albanian *meila (fastening (of a knife)), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *mey- (to attach, fasten).

Noun

mill m (indefinite plural mille, definite singular milli, definite plural millet)

  1. sheath

Declension

References


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin milium.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈmiʎ/
  • Rhymes: -iʎ

Noun

mill m (plural mills)

  1. millet

Derived terms

  • mill del sol

Further reading

  • “mill” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “mill” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “mill” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “mill” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [mʲiːlʲ], [mʲɪlʲ]

Etymology 1

From Old Irish millid (spoils, ruins, destroys)

Verb

mill (present analytic milleann, future analytic millfidh, verbal noun milleadh, past participle millte)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) spoil; mar, ruin
    1. ravish
Conjugation

Etymology 2

Noun

mill f (genitive singular mille, nominative plural milleanna)

  1. Alternative form of meill (flabby, loose, skin; blubber lip; unshapely mouth)
  2. (botany) pendant bud or flower
Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • “mill” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “millid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “mill” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “mill” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Manx

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɪl/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish millid (spoils, ruins, destroys). Cognate with Irish mill and Scottish Gaelic mill.

Verb

mill (past vill, future independent millee, verbal noun milley, past participle millit)

  1. destroy, ruin
  2. spoil, tarnish
  3. (as vision) blur
  4. disfigure
  5. corrupt
  6. mess, tumble, rustle

Etymology 2

From Old Irish mil, from Proto-Celtic *meli, from Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Cognate with Irish mil, Scottish Gaelic mil, Latin mel, Ancient Greek μέλι (méli). Akin to millish and blass.

Noun

mill m (genitive singular molley, plural millyn)

  1. honey

Mutation

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “mil”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /miːʎ/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish millid (spoils, ruins, destroys)

Verb

mill (past mhill, future millidh, verbal noun milleadh, past participle millte)

  1. destroy, spoil, ruin

Etymology 2

Noun

mill m

  1. inflection of meall:
    1. genitive singular
    2. plural

Mutation

Further reading

  • “mill” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “millid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Wiradhuri

Alternative forms

  • mil

Noun

mill

  1. (anatomy) eye

Yagara

Noun

mill

  1. Alternative form of mil.

References

  • State Library of Queensland, Indigenous Language Wordlists Turubul Body Parts.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial