fad vs furor what difference

what is difference between fad and furor

English

Etymology

Of English dialectal origin. Further origin obscure. Possibly from Old English ġefæd (order, decorum) (compare Old English ġefæd (orderly, tidy), fadian, ġefadian (to set in order, arrange); or from French fadaise (“a trifling thought”; see fadaise).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fæd/
  • Rhymes: -æd

Noun

fad (plural fads)

  1. A phenomenon that becomes popular for a very short time.
    • 2004, Andre R. Young, “Encore”, Encore:
      You’re a fad, that means you’re something that we’ve already had, but once you’re gone, you don’t come back.
    • 2010, Eric J. Cesal, Down Detour Road: An Architect in Search of Practice (page 134)
      The pet rock fad was started by an advertising executive named Gary Dahl. The premise was simple: take ordinary rocks, glue eyes on them, and market them as pets.

Derived terms

  • faddish
  • faddy

Translations

Anagrams

  • ADF, D.F.A., DAF, DFA, FDA, daf

Danish

Etymology 1

From French fade, from Late Latin *fatidus, a blend of Latin fatuus (foolish) and vapidus (vapid).

Adjective

fad (neuter fad or fadt, plural and definite singular attributive fade)

  1. insipid, bland, slightly nauseating
  2. (figuratively) flat, insipid, vapid

Etymology 2

From Old Norse fat (vat, vessel, luggage, clothing).

Noun

fad n (singular definite fadet, plural indefinite fade)

  1. basin, bowl, dish
  2. barrel, cask, vat
Inflection

German

Alternative forms

  • fade (predominant in the northern half of Germany)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faːt/
  • Homophones: Fahrt, Pfad (non-standard)
  • Rhymes: -aːt

Adjective

fad (comparative fader, superlative am fadesten or am fadsten)

  1. (predominant in southern Germany and Austria) vapid, flavourless

Declension


Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish fot.

Pronunciation

  • (Munster, Aran) IPA(key): /fˠɑd̪ˠ/
  • (Connemara, Mayo, Ulster) IPA(key): /fˠad̪ˠ/

Noun

fad m (genitive singular faid, nominative plural faid)

  1. length

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

Mutation

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fot, fat”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • “fad” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • “fad” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From French fade.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faːt/
    • Rhymes: -aːt

Adjective

fad (masculine faden, neuter fad, comparative méi fad, superlative am faadsten)

  1. bland, insipid, tasteless
  2. dull, boring, bland

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French fade.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fad/
  • Rhymes: -ad

Adjective

fad m or n (feminine singular fadă, masculine plural fazi, feminine and neuter plural fade)

  1. tasteless, flavorless, insipid

Declension

Synonyms

  • searbăd, insipid, fără gust

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

fad m (genitive singular faid or faide)

  1. length
  2. distance
  3. duration

Derived terms

Related terms

  • fada

Determiner

fad

  1. all, whole

Mutation


Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fad/

Noun

fad (nominative plural fads)

  1. thread

Declension

Derived terms

  • fadäd
  • lefad


English

Alternative forms

  • furore
  • furour (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English fureor, from Middle French fureur, from Old French furor, from Latin furor, from furō (I rage, I am out of my mind).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfjʊəɹɚ/, /ˈfjɝɚ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfjʊərɔː/

Rhymes: -ʊəɹə(ɹ)

  • Homophone: Führer

Noun

furor (countable and uncountable, plural furors)

  1. A general uproar or commotion
  2. Violent anger or frenzy
  3. A state of intense excitement

Latin

Etymology 1

From fūr (thief).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfuː.ror/, [ˈfuːɾɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfu.ror/, [ˈfuːrɔr]

Verb

fūror (present infinitive fūrārī, perfect active fūrātus sum); first conjugation, deponent

  1. I steal, plunder.
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • fūrāx
Related terms
  • fūr
  • fūrtim
  • furtum
  • fūrtīvus
Descendants
  • Aromanian: fur, furari
  • Istro-Romanian: furå
  • Italian: furare
  • Romanian: fura, furare

Etymology 2

From furō (I rage, I am out of my mind) +‎ -or.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfu.ror/, [ˈfʊɾɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfu.ror/, [ˈfuːrɔr]

Noun

furor m (genitive furōris); third declension

  1. a frenzy, rage, madness, fury
Declension

Third-declension noun.

Related terms
  • furō
Descendants

References

  • furor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • furor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • furor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • furor in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin furor.

Noun

furor m (plural furores)

  1. furor (general uproar or commotion)
  2. furor; frenzy (state of intense excitement)
    Synonym: frenesi
  3. fury (extreme anger)
    Synonyms: fúria, ira, cólera

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:furor.

Further reading

  • “furor” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin furor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fuˈɾoɾ/, [fuˈɾoɾ]

Noun

furor m (plural furores)

  1. fury, rage
  2. frenzy

Further reading

  • “furor” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Noun

furor

  1. indefinite plural of fura

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