fade vs slicing what difference

what is difference between fade and slicing

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪd/
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Etymology 1

From Middle English fade, vad, vade (faded, pale, withered, weak), from Middle Dutch vade (weak, faint, limp), from Old French fade (weak, witless), of obscure origin. Probably from Vulgar Latin *fatidus, from Latin fatuus (insipid).

Adjective

fade (comparative fader, superlative fadest)

  1. (archaic) Weak; insipid; tasteless.
    Synonym: dull
    • 1825, Francis Jeffery, review of Theodric by Thomas Campbell
      Passages that are somewhat fade.
    • 1827, Thomas De Quincey, The Last Days of Kant (published in Blackwood’s Magazine)
      His masculine taste gave him a sense of something fade and ludicrous.
Translations

Noun

fade (plural fades)

  1. (golf) A golf shot that curves intentionally to the player’s right (if they are right-handed) or to the left (if left-handed).
    Coordinate terms: slice, hook, draw
    • 2011, James Lythgoe, The Golf Swing: It’s all in the hands (page 88)
      If you confine yourself to hitting straight shots while you are developing your golf swing, you are less likely to develop a preference for hitting a fade or a draw.
  2. A haircut where the hair is short or shaved on the sides of the head and longer on top. See also high-top fade and low fade.
  3. (slang) A fight.
  4. (music, cinematography) A gradual decrease in the brightness of a shot or the volume of sound or music (as a means of cutting to a new scene or starting a new song).
  5. (slang) The act of disappearing from a place so as not to be found; covert departure.
    • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Things
      Ace could have done a fade. Instead, he gathered all his courage — which was not inconsiderable, even in his middle age — and went to see the Flying Corson Brothers.
Derived terms
  • brake fade
Translations

Verb

fade (third-person singular simple present fades, present participle fading, simple past and past participle faded)

  1. (transitive, golf) To hit the ball with the shot called a fade.
    • 2011, Gary McCord, Golf For Dummies (page 284)
      The Golden Bear faded the ball from left to right with great consistency, so he seldom had to worry about trouble on the left.
  2. (intransitive) To grow weak; to lose strength; to decay; to perish gradually; to wither, as a plant.
    • The earth mourneth and fadeth away.
  3. (intransitive) To lose freshness, color, or brightness; to become faint in hue or tint; hence, to be wanting in color.
  4. (intransitive) To sink away; to disappear gradually; to grow dim; to vanish.
    The milkman’s whistling faded into the distance.
    • 1856, Eleanor Marx-Aveling (translator), Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter XI,
      A strange thing was that Bovary, while continually thinking of Emma, was forgetting her. He grew desperate as he felt this image fading from his memory in spite of all efforts to retain it. Yet every night he dreamt of her; it was always the same dream. He drew near her, but when he was about to clasp her she fell into decay in his arms.
    • They say your love will surely fade girl
      When things go wrong and trouble calls
  5. (transitive) To cause to fade.
  6. (transitive, gambling) To bet against.
Synonyms
  • (grow weak, lose strength): weaken, wither
  • (lose freshness, color, or brightness): blanch, bleach
  • (sink away): decrease, diminish, wane
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English fade, fede, of uncertain origin. Compare Old English ġefæd (orderly, tidy, discreet, well-regulated). See also fad.

Adjective

fade (comparative fader or more fade, superlative fadest or most fade)

  1. (archaic) Strong; bold; doughty.

Anagrams

  • Deaf, EDFA, FDEA, deaf

Danish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -aːdə

Adjective

fade

  1. definite of fad
  2. plural of fad

Noun

fade n

  1. indefinite plural of fad

Finnish

Etymology

< Swedish fader (father)

Noun

fade

  1. (slang) father

Declension

Synonyms

  • isä (standard)

French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *fatidus, blend of Latin fatuus and vapidus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fad/

Adjective

fade (plural fades)

  1. tasteless, insipid
  2. boring; lukewarm

Synonyms

  • (lacking in interesting features): terne, insignifiant

Noun

fade m (plural fades)

  1. (criminal slang) share of loot / booty

Verb

fade

  1. inflection of fader:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “fade” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Alternative forms

  • fad (particularly in southern Germany and Austria)

Etymology

From French fade, from Vulgar Latin fatidus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaːdə/
  • Homophone: Pfade (only according to a regional pronunciation of this word)
  • Rhymes: -aːdə

Adjective

fade (comparative fader, superlative am fadesten or am fadsten)

  1. bland, flavorless, stale, boring
    • 1922, Rudolf Steiner, Nationalökonomischer Kurs, Erster Vortrag

Declension

Further reading

  • “fade” in Duden online
  • “fade” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Yola

Pronoun

fade

  1. Alternative form of faade
    • (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) ; in: Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 84 & 85

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 39


English

Noun

slicing (plural slicings)

  1. The action of the verb to slice.

Verb

slicing

  1. present participle of slice

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