fag vs fatigue what difference

what is difference between fag and fatigue

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1

Probably from fag end (remnant), from Middle English fagge (flap).

Noun

fag (plural fags)

  1. (US, technical) In textile inspections, a rough or coarse defect in the woven fabric.
  2. (Britain, Ireland, Australia, colloquial, dated in US and Canada) A cigarette.
    • 1968 January 25, The Bulletin, Oregon,
      He′d Phase Out Fag Industry
      Los Angeles (UPI) – A UCLA professor has called for the phasing out of the cigarette industry by converting tobacco acres to other crops.
    • 2001, Oliver Sacks, Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood, Alfred A. Knopf (2001), 15,
      All of them, like my mother, were heavy smokers, and after warming themselves by the fire, they would sit on the sofa and smoke, lobbing their wet fag ends into the fire.
    • 2011, Bill Marsh, Great Australian Shearing Stories, unnumbered page,
      So I started off by asking the shearers if they minded if I took a belly off while they were having a fag. Then after a while they were asking me. They′d say, ‘Do yer wanta take over fer a bit while I have a fag?’ And then I got better and I′d finish the sheep and they′d say ‘Christ, I haven′t finished me bloody fag yet, yer may as well shear anotherie.’
  3. (Britain, obsolete, colloquial) The worst part or end of a thing.
Synonyms
  • (cigarette): ciggy (Australia, Britain), smoke, (Cockney rhyming slang) oily rag
Derived terms
  • fag end
  • fag packet
Translations

Etymology 2

Akin to flag (droop, tire). Compare Dutch vaak (sleepiness).

Noun

fag (plural fags)

  1. (Britain, dated, colloquial) A chore: an arduous and tiresome task.
    • 1818, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, 1992, Complete Works of Jane Austen, p. 123:
      We are sadly off in the country; not but what we have very good shops in Salisbury, but it is so far to go—eight miles is a long way; Mr. Allen says it is nine, measured nine; but I am sure it cannot be more than eight; and it is such a fag—I come back tired to death.
  2. (Britain, education, archaic, colloquial) A younger student acting as a servant for senior students.
    • 1791, Richard Cumberland, The Observer, Vol. 4, page 67:
      I had the character at ſchool of being the very beſt fag that ever came into it.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 18:
      A gang of fags was mobbing about by the notice-boards. They fell silent as he approached. He patted one of them on the head. ‘Pretty children,’ he sighed, digging into his waistcoat pocket and pulling out a handful of change. ‘Tonight you shall eat.’ Scattering the coins at their feet, he moved on.

Verb

fag (third-person singular simple present fags, present participle fagging, simple past and past participle fagged)

  1. (transitive, colloquial, used mainly in passive form) To make exhausted, tired out.
  2. (intransitive, colloquial) To droop; to tire.
    • a. 1829, G. Mackenzie, Lives, quoted in 1829, “Fag”, entry in The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary, Volume 9, page 12,
      Creighton with-held his force ’till the Italian began to fag, and then brought him to the ground.
  3. (intransitive, Britain, education, archaic, colloquial) For a younger student to act as a servant for senior students in many British boarding schools.
  4. (transitive, Britain, education, archaic, colloquial) To have (a younger student) act as a servant in this way.
  5. (intransitive, Britain, archaic) To work hard, especially on menial chores.

Derived terms

  • (to act as a servant): fagger, faggery, fagging (as a noun), fagmaster
  • (to tire): fagged out

Etymology 3

From faggot.

Noun

fag (plural fags)

  1. (chiefly US, Canada, vulgar, usually offensive, sometimes endearing) A homosexual man, especially (usually derogatory) an especially effeminate or unusual one.
    • 1921 John Lind, The Female Impersonators (Historical Documentation of American Slang v. 1, A-G, edited by Jonathan E. Lighter (New York: Random House, 1994) page 716.
      Androgynes known as “fairies,” “fags,” or “brownies.”
  2. (US, vulgar, offensive) An annoying person.
    Why did you do that, you fag?
Usage notes

In North America, fag is often considered highly offensive, although some gay people have tried to reclaim it. (Compare faggot.) The humorousness of derived terms fag hag and fag stag is sometimes considered to lessen their offensiveness.

Synonyms
  • (male homosexual): See Thesaurus:homosexual person
  • (annoying person): See Thesaurus:jerk
Derived terms
  • fag hag
  • fag stag
Translations

Anagrams

  • Afg., gaf

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • fagu, fau

Etymology

From Latin fāgus. Compare Romanian fag.

Noun

fag m (plural fadz)

  1. beech

Derived terms

  • fagã

Related terms

  • fãdzet

Danish

Etymology

From German Fach (compartment, drawer, subject), from Old High German fah (wall).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faːˀɣ/, [ˈfæˀj], [ˈfæˀ], IPA(key): [ˈfɑw-] (in derivatives)

Noun

fag n (singular definite faget, plural indefinite fag)

  1. subject (of study)
  2. trade, craft, profession
  3. bay (the distance between two vertical or horizontal supports in roofs and walls)

Derived terms

  • fagfelt
  • fagmand
  • faglig
  • faglitteratur
  • skolefag

Inflection


Icelandic

Etymology

Borrowed from Danish fag, itself a borrowing from German Fach.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [faːɣ]
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

fag n (genitive singular fags, nominative plural fög)

  1. subject (particular area of study)

Declension

Synonyms

  • (subject): námsgrein

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German or German Low German fak; compare with German Fach

Noun

fag n (definite singular faget, indefinite plural fag, definite plural faga or fagene)

  1. subject (e.g., at school)
  2. profession, trade, discipline

Derived terms

References

  • “fag” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German or German Low German fak; compare with German Fach

Noun

fag n (definite singular faget, indefinite plural fag, definite plural faga)

  1. subject (e.g., at school)
  2. profession, trade, discipline

Derived terms

References

  • “fag” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fak/

Noun

fag m anim

  1. phage

Declension


Romanian

Etymology 1

From Latin fāgus, from Proto-Italic *fāgos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵos (beech tree).

Noun

fag m (plural fagi)

  1. beech (tree of genus Fagus)
Declension
Related terms
  • făget

Etymology 2

From Latin favus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰōw- (to swell, grow, thrive, be, live, dwell).

Noun

fag n (plural faguri)

  1. (archaic) honeycomb
Synonyms
  • fagure

Welsh

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vaɡ/

Noun

fag

  1. Soft mutation of bag.

Mutation

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vaːɡ/

Noun

fag

  1. Soft mutation of mag.

Mutation


English

Etymology

From French fatigue, from fatiguer, from Latin fatīgāre (to weary, tire, vex, harass)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fəˈtiːɡ/
  • Rhymes: -iːɡ

Noun

fatigue (countable and uncountable, plural fatigues)

  1. A weariness caused by exertion; exhaustion.
  2. (often in the plural) A menial task or tasks, especially in the military.
  3. (engineering) Weakening and eventual failure of material, typically by cracking leading to complete separation, caused by repeated application of mechanical stress to the material.
    • 2013, N. Dowling, Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, page 399
      Mechanical failures due to fatigue have been the subject of engineering efforts for more than 150 years.

Synonyms

  • Thesaurus:fatigue

Derived terms

  • fatigues (military work clothing)
  • diversity fatigue
  • donor fatigue
  • fatigueless
  • fatigue duty

Translations

Verb

fatigue (third-person singular simple present fatigues, present participle fatiguing, simple past and past participle fatigued)

  1. (transitive) To tire or make weary by physical or mental exertion.
  2. (transitive, cooking) To wilt a salad by dressing or tossing it.
    • 1927, Dorothy L. Sayers, Unnatural Death, chapter 1
      The handsome, silver-haired proprietor was absorbed in fatiguing a salad for a family party.
  3. (intransitive) To lose so much strength or energy that one becomes tired, weary, feeble or exhausted.
  4. (intransitive, engineering, of a material specimen) To undergo the process of fatigue; to fail as a result of fatigue.
  5. (transitive, engineering) To cause to undergo the process of fatigue.

Related terms

  • fatigable
  • indefatigable

Translations

Further reading

  • fatigue in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fatigue in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fa.tiɡ/

Noun

fatigue f (plural fatigues)

  1. fatigue, weariness

Derived terms

  • tomber de fatigue

Related terms

  • fatigué
  • fatiguer

Further reading

  • “fatigue” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Verb

fatigue

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  3. third-person singular imperative of fatigar

Spanish

Verb

fatigue

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fatigar.

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