faggot vs fagot what difference

what is difference between faggot and fagot

English

Alternative forms

  • fagot

Etymology

From Middle English fagot, from Middle French fagot (bundle of sticks) in turn from the Medieval Latin and Italian fagotto. Compare Old Occitan fagot, Italian fagotto, fangotto, Spanish fajo (bundle, wad). Perhaps from a diminutive of Vulgar Latin *facus, from Latin fascis (bundle of wood). The senses relating to persons, though possibly originating as an extension of the sense “bundle of sticks”, could have been reinforced by Yiddish פֿייגעלע(feygele). Doublet of fagotto. See also: fag.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfæ.ɡət/
  • Rhymes: -æɡət
  • Hyphenation: fag‧got

Noun

faggot (plural faggots)

  1. (chiefly Britain, collective) A bundle of sticks or brushwood intended to be used for fuel tied together for carrying. (Some sources specify that a faggot is tied with two bands or withes, whereas a bavin is tied with just one.)
  2. (obsolete) Burdensome baggage.
  3. A bundle of pieces of iron or steel cut off into suitable lengths for welding.
  4. (rare, dated in US) A burning or smouldering piece of firewood.
    • 1961, Poul Anderson, Three Hearts and Three Lions
      He clambered back on his feet and grinned at them. The waning faggot cast red light over his fangs.
    • 1965, Frank Herbert, Dune
      To the east, the night grew a faggot of luminous gray, then seashell opalescence that dimmed the stars.
  5. (chiefly Britain) A meatball made with offcuts and offal, especially pork. (See Wikipedia.)
  6. (offensive, vulgar, derogatory) An annoying or inconsiderate person.
  7. (Britain, Ireland, colloquial, derogatory, obsolete) A shrewish woman.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:shrew
    • 1591, Thomas Lodge, Catharos Diogenes in his Singularity (Oxford English Dictionary, faggot, fagot, n., 2nd Edition, 1989, Oxford University Press, accessed 12 Jan 2009)
      A filbert is better than a faggot, except it be an Athenian she handfull.
    • Darby, who prided himself on maintaining silence, could not preserve the consistency of his character upon this occasion … “Your sowl to the divil, you faggot!” he exclaimed, “what do you mane? The divil whip the tongue out o’ you! …”
    • 1925, D. H. Lawrence, Reflections on the Death of a Porcupine and Other Essays: .. Love Was Once a Little Boy
      To me she is fractious, tiresome, and a faggot. Yet the subtle desirableness is in her, for me. As it is in the brown hen, or even a sow.
    • DA: You faggot, you; don’t let on you don’t know.
  8. (offensive, vulgar) A homosexual man, especially an effeminate one.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:male homosexual
    Coordinate terms: dyke, scissor sister
    • 1914, Louis E. Jackson and C.R. Hellyer, Vocabulary of Criminal Slang (Portland, OR: Modern Printing Co., 1914) page 30:
      Drag, Example: “All the fagots (sissies) will be dressed in drag at the ball tonight.
    • 2012, Ernesto Martínez, On Making Sense: Queer Race Narratives of Intelligibility
      Of course I’m a faggot, darling. I’m a flaming faggot, darling. I am fanning the flames of my faggotry.
  9. (offensive, vulgar) A man considered weak, effeminate, timid, pathetic, emotional, non-heteronormative in some way
  10. (obsolete) A soldier numbered on the muster-roll, but not really existing.
  11. (Britain, historical) A faggot voter.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

faggot (third-person singular simple present faggots, present participle faggoting, simple past and past participle faggoted)

  1. Alternative form of fagot

Further reading

  • faggot at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • faggot in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • faggot on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Alternative forms

  • faggot

Etymology

Most likely from Italian fagotto, from Latin fascis.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfæɡ.ət/

Homophone: faggot

Noun

fagot (plural fagots)

  1. Alternative form of faggot
    • 1588, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Titus Andronicus, Act 3 Scene 1:
      What fool hath added water to the sea, / Or brought a fagot to bright-burning Troy?
  2. A bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be worked over into bars or other shapes by rolling or hammering at a welding heat; a pile.
  3. (music, obsolete) A fagotto, or bassoon.
  4. (Britain, obsolete) A person hired to take the place of another at the muster of a company.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)

Verb

fagot (third-person singular simple present fagots, present participle fagoting, simple past and past participle fagoted)

  1. (transitive) To make a fagot of; to bind together in a fagot or bundle.

Anagrams

  • TOGAF

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /fəˈɡɔt/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /faˈɡɔt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots)

  1. bassoon (wind instrument)

Czech

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [faɡɔt]

Noun

fagot m

  1. bassoon (musical instrument)

Declension


Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from French fagot, from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɡɔt/, [faˈɡ̊ʌd̥], [fɑˈɡ̊ʌd̥]

Noun

fagot c (singular definite fagotten, plural indefinite fagotter)

  1. bassoon (musical instrument in the woodwind family)

Declension

References

  • “fagot” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto. Later borrowed again from German Fagott. The theory that the name derives from a faggot of stick in reference to the way the parts of a bassoon are stored is a pseudo-etymology.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faːˈɣɔt/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧got
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

fagot m (plural fagotten, diminutive fagotje n)

  1. bassoon

Derived terms

  • basfagot
  • fagotspeler
  • fagottist

References


French

Etymology

From Middle French fagot

Pronunciation

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots)

  1. fagot (bundle of sticks, twigs or small tree branches bound together)

Derived terms

  • de derrière les fagots
  • sentir le fagot

Further reading

  • “fagot” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

Borrowed from German Fagott, from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈɡɔt/

Noun

fagot m

  1. bassoon

Declension


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • faggett, faget, ffagott, fakett, fagett

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French fagot; further etymology is disputed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaɡɔt/, /ˈfaɡət/, /ˈfakət/

Noun

fagot (plural fagotes)

  1. A piece of wood for burning; firewood.
  2. A faggot or bavin (bundled sticks of wood)

Descendants

  • English: faggot, fagot
  • Scots: faggot
  • Yola: fagoghes (plural)

References

  • “fagot, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-1-1.

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French fagot

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots)

  1. fagot (bundle of sticks, twigs or small tree branches bound together)

Old French

Etymology

From Medieval Latin and Italian fagotto

Noun

fagot m (oblique plural fagoz or fagotz, nominative singular fagoz or fagotz, nominative plural fagot)

  1. fagot (bundle of sticks, twigs or small tree branches bound together)

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (fagot, supplement)
  • fagot on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Polish

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.ɡɔt/

Noun

fagot m inan

  1. (music) bassoon

Declension

Related terms

  • fagocista m, fagocistka f
  • fagotowy

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto.

Noun

fagot n (plural fagoturi)

  1. bassoon (reed instrument)

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Noun

fàgot m (Cyrillic spelling фа̀гот)

  1. bassoon

Declension


Slovak

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaɡɔt/

Noun

fagot m (genitive singular fagotu, nominative plural fagoty, genitive plural fagotov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. (music) bassoon

Declension

Further reading

  • fagot in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Slovene

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɡóːt/

Noun

fagọ̑t m inan

  1. (music) bassoon (musical instrument in the woodwind family)

Inflection


Spanish

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈɡot/, [faˈɣ̞ot̪]
  • Rhymes: -ot
  • Hyphenation: fa‧got

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots or fagotes)

  1. (music) bassoon

Derived terms

  • fagotista

Further reading

  • “fagot” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fɑˈɡot]

Noun

fagot (definite accusative fagotu, plural fagotlar)

  1. A bassoon (reed instrument)

Declension

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