fagot vs queen what difference

what is difference between fagot and queen

English

Alternative forms

  • faggot

Etymology

Most likely from Italian fagotto, from Latin fascis.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfæɡ.ət/

Homophone: faggot

Noun

fagot (plural fagots)

  1. Alternative form of faggot
    • 1588, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Titus Andronicus, Act 3 Scene 1:
      What fool hath added water to the sea, / Or brought a fagot to bright-burning Troy?
  2. A bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be worked over into bars or other shapes by rolling or hammering at a welding heat; a pile.
  3. (music, obsolete) A fagotto, or bassoon.
  4. (Britain, obsolete) A person hired to take the place of another at the muster of a company.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)

Verb

fagot (third-person singular simple present fagots, present participle fagoting, simple past and past participle fagoted)

  1. (transitive) To make a fagot of; to bind together in a fagot or bundle.

Anagrams

  • TOGAF

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /fəˈɡɔt/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /faˈɡɔt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots)

  1. bassoon (wind instrument)

Czech

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [faɡɔt]

Noun

fagot m

  1. bassoon (musical instrument)

Declension


Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from French fagot, from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɡɔt/, [faˈɡ̊ʌd̥], [fɑˈɡ̊ʌd̥]

Noun

fagot c (singular definite fagotten, plural indefinite fagotter)

  1. bassoon (musical instrument in the woodwind family)

Declension

References

  • “fagot” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto. Later borrowed again from German Fagott. The theory that the name derives from a faggot of stick in reference to the way the parts of a bassoon are stored is a pseudo-etymology.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faːˈɣɔt/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧got
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

fagot m (plural fagotten, diminutive fagotje n)

  1. bassoon

Derived terms

  • basfagot
  • fagotspeler
  • fagottist

References


French

Etymology

From Middle French fagot

Pronunciation

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots)

  1. fagot (bundle of sticks, twigs or small tree branches bound together)

Derived terms

  • de derrière les fagots
  • sentir le fagot

Further reading

  • “fagot” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

Borrowed from German Fagott, from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈɡɔt/

Noun

fagot m

  1. bassoon

Declension


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • faggett, faget, ffagott, fakett, fagett

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French fagot; further etymology is disputed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaɡɔt/, /ˈfaɡət/, /ˈfakət/

Noun

fagot (plural fagotes)

  1. A piece of wood for burning; firewood.
  2. A faggot or bavin (bundled sticks of wood)

Descendants

  • English: faggot, fagot
  • Scots: faggot
  • Yola: fagoghes (plural)

References

  • “fagot, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-1-1.

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French fagot

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots)

  1. fagot (bundle of sticks, twigs or small tree branches bound together)

Old French

Etymology

From Medieval Latin and Italian fagotto

Noun

fagot m (oblique plural fagoz or fagotz, nominative singular fagoz or fagotz, nominative plural fagot)

  1. fagot (bundle of sticks, twigs or small tree branches bound together)

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (fagot, supplement)
  • fagot on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Polish

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.ɡɔt/

Noun

fagot m inan

  1. (music) bassoon

Declension

Related terms

  • fagocista m, fagocistka f
  • fagotowy

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto.

Noun

fagot n (plural fagoturi)

  1. bassoon (reed instrument)

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Noun

fàgot m (Cyrillic spelling фа̀гот)

  1. bassoon

Declension


Slovak

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaɡɔt/

Noun

fagot m (genitive singular fagotu, nominative plural fagoty, genitive plural fagotov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. (music) bassoon

Declension

Further reading

  • fagot in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Slovene

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɡóːt/

Noun

fagọ̑t m inan

  1. (music) bassoon (musical instrument in the woodwind family)

Inflection


Spanish

Etymology

From French fagot (bundle of sticks) (referring to the wood used to make the instrument).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈɡot/, [faˈɣ̞ot̪]
  • Rhymes: -ot
  • Hyphenation: fa‧got

Noun

fagot m (plural fagots or fagotes)

  1. (music) bassoon

Derived terms

  • fagotista

Further reading

  • “fagot” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian fagotto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fɑˈɡot]

Noun

fagot (definite accusative fagotu, plural fagotlar)

  1. A bassoon (reed instrument)

Declension


English

Alternative forms

  • queene, quene, queyne (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English quene, queen, cwen, from Old English cwēn (queen), from Proto-West Germanic *kwāni, from Proto-Germanic *kwēniz (woman), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷénh₂s (woman). Cognate with Scots queen, wheen (queen), Old Saxon quān (“wife”; > Middle Low German quene (elderly woman)), Dutch kween (woman past child-bearing age), Swedish kvinna (woman), Danish kvinde (woman), Icelandic kvon (wife), Gothic ???????????????? (qēns, wife), Norwegian dialectal kvån (wife). Related to Old English cwene (woman; female serf, quean), see quean. Generally eclipsed non-native Middle English regina (queen), borrowed from Latin rēgīna (queen) (see Modern English regina). Doublet of gyne.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kwiːn/, [kʷw̥iːn], enPR: kwēn
  • Rhymes: -iːn
  • Homophone: quean

Noun

queen (plural queens)

  1. A female monarch. Example: Queen Victoria.
  2. The wife or widow of a king.
  3. (chess) The most powerful piece, able to move any number of spaces horizontally, vertically, or diagonally.
  4. (card games) A playing card with the letter “Q” and the image of a queen on it, the twelfth card in a given suit.
  5. A red disk that is the most valuable piece in the Asian game of carom.
  6. A powerful or forceful female person.
  7. (LGBT, slang, often derogatory) An effeminate male homosexual. (See usage notes.)
    • (Can we date this quote?), Bebe Scarpi, quoted in 2007, Stephan Cohen, The Gay Liberation Youth Movement in New York →ISBN, page 196:
      Despite one’s opinion of Sylvia I can attest to the purity of her intent and dedication, and, no one will dare deny she is one gutsy queen.
  8. (LGBT, slang) Ellipsis of drag queen.
  9. A reproductive female animal in a hive, such as an ant, bee, termite or wasp.
  10. An adult female cat valued for breeding. See also tom.
  11. A queen olive.
    • 1984, United States International Trade Commission, Bottled green olives from Spain (page A-24)
      Prices for the two main types of Spanish style green olives – manzanillas and queens – vary according to the size of the crop of each. In some years queens will be more expensive than manzanillas []
  12. A monarch butterfly (Danaus spp., esp. Danaus gilippus).

Usage notes

  • (LGBT): The term can be either derogatory or a self-identification. (Compare nigger.)
  • (LGBT): Some of the people who were historically (in the late 1960s and 1970s) described as “queens” or “drag queens” or “street queens” are now sometimes considered transgender, especially when their gender identity is female or non-binary/genderqueer rather than male. Some people, like Sylvia Rivera, self-identified as both a “transgender person” and a “street queen”. Drag queens, too, can have any gender identity.

Synonyms

  • (female monarch): queen regnant, Regina (the reigning queen, formal)
  • (wife of a king): queen consort, Regina (the reigning queen, formal)
  • (LGBT): See Thesaurus:male homosexual
  • (playing card): bitch, cowgirl, girl, lady, mop squeezer

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

See also

  • ,
  • Verb

    queen (third-person singular simple present queens, present participle queening, simple past and past participle queened)

    1. To make a queen.
    2. (intransitive, obsolete) To act the part of a queen; to queen it.
    3. (chess) To promote a pawn, usually to a queen.
    4. (beekeeping) To provide with a new queen.
    5. (beekeeping) To be the queen of a colony.
    6. (BDSM, slang, transitive, of a female) To sit on the face of (a partner) to receive oral sex.
      • 2000, “Lorelei”, The Mistress Manual: The Good Girl’s Guide to Female Dominance
        Try Queening him. Have him lie on his back while you sit on his face (make sure he has an airway through either his mouth or his nose).

    Derived terms

    • queen out

    Translations

    Anagrams

    • quene

    Middle English

    Noun

    queen

    1. Alternative form of quene (queen)

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