fain vs willingly what difference

what is difference between fain and willingly

English

Alternative forms

  • faine (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • Homophones: feign, fane, foehn

Etymology 1

From Middle English fain, from Old English fægen, from Proto-Germanic *faganaz (glad), from Proto-Indo-European *peḱ- (to make pretty, please oneself); akin to Old Norse feginn (glad, joyful), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (faginōn, to rejoice), Old Norse fagna (to rejoice).

Adjective

fain (comparative more fain, superlative most fain)

  1. (archaic) Well-pleased, glad.
  2. (archaic) Satisfied, contented.
  3. (archaic) Eager, willing or inclined to.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act II scene i[1]:
      Men and birds are fain of climbing high.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      To a busy man, temptation is fain to climb up together with his business.
  4. (archaic) Obliged or compelled to.
Quotations
  • 1900, Ernest Dowson, To One in Bedlam, lines 9-10
    O lamentable brother! if those pity thee, / Am I not fain of all thy lone eyes promise me;
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English fain, fayn, feyn, from the adjective (see above).

Adverb

fain (comparative fainer, superlative fainest)

  1. (archaic) With joy; gladly.
    • c. 1598-99, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act III scene v[2]:
      Leonato: I would fain know what you have to say.
    • 1633, John Donne, Holly Sonnets, XIV:
      Yet dearly I love you, and would be loved fain, / But am betroth’d unto your enemy
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe:
      The second thing I fain would have had was a tobacco-pipe, but it was impossible to me to make one…
  2. (archaic) By will or choice.
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I scene i[4]:
      Gonzalo: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground— long heath, brown furze, anything. The wills above be done, but I would fain die a dry death.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English fainen, from Old English fæġenian, from Proto-West Germanic *faginōn, from Proto-Germanic *faginōną.

Verb

fain (third-person singular simple present fains, present participle faining, simple past and past participle fained)

  1. (archaic) To be delighted or glad; to rejoice.
  2. (archaic) To gladden.
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • an if, fina, naif, naïf

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Latin fīnis, fīnem.

Noun

fain m

  1. end

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English fæġen, from Proto-Germanic *faganaz (glad). The adverb is transferred from the adjective.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛi̯n/

Adjective

fain

  1. joyful, happy
  2. willing, eager
  3. pleasing, enjoyable, attractive

Alternative forms

  • fagen, vain, fawe, fawen, vawe, fein, fane, fayn, fayne, vayn, feyn

Adverb

fain

  1. gladly, joyfully
  2. willingly, eagerly

Alternative forms

  • fayn, faȝe, fawe, fawen, vawe, fene, vain, vayn, vein, veyn, vane, wane

Descendants

  • English: fain
  • Scots: fain

References

  • “fain, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • “fain, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norman

Etymology

From Old French foin, fein, from Latin faenum.

Noun

fain m (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) hay

Derived terms

  • fagot d’fain (bundle of hay)

Old French

Alternative forms

  • faim

Etymology

From Latin famēs.

Noun

fain f (nominative singular fain)

  1. hunger

Descendants

  • French: faim

Related terms

  • famine

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from German fein.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fajn/

Adjective

fain m or n (feminine singular faină, masculine plural faini, feminine and neuter plural faine)

  1. cool, fine, of good quality

Declension


Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Sursilvan) fein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) fagn

Etymology

From Latin faenum.

Noun

fain m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) hay

Derived terms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) far fain
  • (Puter) fer cul fain
  • (Vallader) far cun fain

Related terms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan) fanar

Siar-Lak

Noun

fain

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)


English

Etymology

From Middle English willyngly, wyllyngly (intentionally, deliverately; freely, gladly), from Old English willendlīċe (diligently), equivalent to willing +‎ -ly.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɪlɪŋli/
  • Hyphenation: will‧ing‧ly

Adverb

willingly (comparative more willingly, superlative most willingly)

  1. Of one’s own free will; freely and spontaneously.
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 29.
      Now this is a process of the mind or thought, of which I would willingly know the foundation.

Synonyms

  • gladly, happily

Translations


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