fair vs just what difference

what is difference between fair and just

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɛə/, /fɛː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɛəɹ/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /feː(ə)/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /fɪə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: fare

Etymology 1

From Middle English fayr, feir, fager, from Old English fæġer (beautiful), from Proto-West Germanic *fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz (suitable, fitting, nice), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ḱ- (to fasten, place).

Cognate with Scots fayr, fare (fair), Danish feir, faver, fager (fair, pretty), Norwegian fager (fair, pretty), Swedish fager (fair, pretty), Icelandic fagur (beautiful, fair), Umbrian pacer (gracious, merciful, kind), Slovak pekný (good-looking, handsome, nice). See also peace.

Adjective

fair (comparative fairer, superlative fairest)

  1. (archaic or literary) Beautiful, of a pleasing appearance, with a pure and fresh quality.
    • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
      He is so fair, without lease, he seems full well to sit on this.
  2. Unblemished (figuratively or literally); clean and pure; innocent.
    • 1605, The Booke of Common Prayer, and Administration of the Sacraments, London: Robert Barker, “The order for the administration of the Lords Supper, or holy Communion,”[1]
      The Table hauing at the Communion time a faire white linnen cloth vpon it, shall stand in the body of the Church, or in the Chancell, where Morning prayer and Euening prayer be appointed to be said.
    • 1665, Robert Hooke, Micrographia, London, Observation 21, “Of Moss, and several other small vegetative Substances,” p. 135,[2]
      [] I have observ’d, that putting fair Water (whether Rain-water or Pump-water, or May-dew, or Snow-water, it was almost all one) I have often observ’d, I say, that this Water would, with a little standing, tarnish and cover all about the sides of the Glass that lay under water, with a lovely green []
  3. Light in color, pale, particularly with regard to skin tone but also referring to blond hair.
    • 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature, page 200
      the northern people large and fair-complexioned
  4. Just, equitable.
  5. Adequate, reasonable, or decent.
    Their performance has been only fair.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The words of these songs were either without meaning, or derived from an idiom with which Watt, a very fair linguist, had no acquaintance.
  6. (nautical, of a wind) Favorable to a ship’s course.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 563:
      I shipped with them and becoming friends, we set forth on our venture, in health and safety; and sailed with a fair wind, till we came to a city called Madínat-al-Sín; []
  7. Not overcast; cloudless; clear; pleasant; propitious; said of the sky, weather, or wind, etc.
    • 1909, Frank R. Stockton, The adventures of Captain Horn Chapter 42
      They had good weather and tolerably fair winds, and before they entered the Straits of Magellan the captain had formulated a plan for the disposition of Garta.
  8. Free from obstacles or hindrances; unobstructed; unencumbered; open; direct; said of a road, passage, etc.
    • c. 1610?, Walter Raleigh, A Discourse of War
      The caliphs obtained a mighty empire, which was in a fair way to have enlarged.
  9. (shipbuilding) Without sudden change of direction or curvature; smooth; flowing; said of the figure of a vessel, and of surfaces, water lines, and other lines.
  10. (baseball) Between the baselines.
  11. (rugby, of a catch) Taken direct from an opponent’s foot, without the ball touching the ground or another player.
  12. (cricket, of a ball delivered by the bowler) Not a no ball.
  13. (statistics) Of a coin or die, having equal chance of landing on any side, unbiased.
Synonyms
  • (beautiful): beautiful, pretty, lovely
  • (unblemished): pure, clean, neat
  • (light in color): pale
  • (just): honest, just, equitable
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

fair (plural fair)

  1. Something which is fair (in various senses of the adjective).
  2. (obsolete) A woman, a member of the ‘fair sex’; also as a collective singular, women.
    • 1744, Georg Friedrich Händel, Hercules, act 2, scene 8
      Love and Hymen, hand in hand, / Come, restore the nuptial band! / And sincere delights prepare / To crown the hero and the fair.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, III.24:
      If single, probably his plighted Fair / Has in his absence wedded some rich miser  [].
  3. (obsolete) Fairness, beauty.
  4. A fair woman; a sweetheart.
    • 1743, William Shenstone, A Pastoral Ballad
      I have found out a gift for my fair.
  5. (obsolete) Good fortune; good luck.
    • c. 1590–1592, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act V scene ii[3]:
      Now, fair befall thee, good Petruchio!

Verb

fair (third-person singular simple present fairs, present participle fairing, simple past and past participle faired)

  1. (transitive) To smoothen or even a surface (especially a connection or junction on a surface).
  2. (transitive) To bring into perfect alignment (especially about rivet holes when connecting structural members).
  3. (transitive, art) To make an animation smooth, removing any jerkiness.
    • 1996, Computer Animation ’96: June 3-4, 1996, Geneva, Switzerland (page 136)
      Since the sequence of data contain sampling noises, the captured motion is not smooth and wiggles along the moving path. There are well-known fairing algorithms in Euclidean space based on difference geometry.
  4. (transitive) To construct or design with the aim of producing a smooth outline or reducing air drag or water resistance.
    • 1920, Technical Report of the Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (page 206)
      Two forward cars were provided with the model. One of these (shown detached in Fig. 1) was faired at its after end, with a view to possible reduction of head resistance, and to induce a better flow of air to the propeller.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To make fair or beautiful.
Synonyms
  • (to reduce air drag or water resistance): to streamline
Derived terms
  • fair off
  • fair up
  • fairing
Translations

Adverb

fair (comparative more fair or fairer, superlative most fair or fairest)

  1. clearly, openly, frankly, civilly, honestly, favorably, auspiciously, agreeably
Derived terms
  • bid fair
  • fair and square

Etymology 2

From Middle English feyre, from Old French foire, from Latin fēriae.

Noun

fair (plural fairs)

  1. A community gathering to celebrate and exhibit local achievements.
  2. An event for public entertainment and trade, a market.
  3. An event for professionals in a trade to learn of new products and do business, a trade fair.
  4. A travelling amusement park (called a funfair in British English and a (travelling) carnival in US English).
Derived terms
  • fairgrounds
  • funfair
Translations

References

  • fair at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • fair in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • fair in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • RIFA, fiar, rifa-

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛːr/
  • Hyphenation: fair

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English fair, from Middle English fayr, from Old English fæġer, from Proto-West Germanic *fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz.

Adjective

fair (comparative fairer, superlative fairst)

  1. (colloquial, affected) fair (just, honest, equitable, adequate).
Inflection

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English fair, from Middle English feyre, from Old French foire, from Latin fēriae.

Noun

fair m (plural fairs)

  1. A fair (social event, type of market).
    Synonyms: braderie, jaarmarkt
  2. (rare) A funfair, carnival.
    Synonyms: foor, kermis
Related terms
  • foor

German

Etymology

From English fair, from Old English fæġer, from Proto-West Germanic *fagr, from Proto-Germanic *fagraz, whence also Middle High German vager (splendid, wonderful).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɛːr/, [fɛːɐ̯], [feːɐ̯], [fɛɐ̯]
  • Hyphenation: fair

Adjective

fair (comparative fairer, superlative am fairsten)

  1. (especially sports) fair (just, honest, equitable, adequate)

Declension

Synonyms

  • anständig
  • ehrlich
  • gerecht
  • gleich
  • ausgeglichen
  • angemessen
  • sauber

Antonyms

  • unfair

Derived terms

  • Fairness (rarely Fairheit)
  • Fairplay
  • Fair-Use-Doktrin

Further reading

  • “fair” in Duden online
  • “fair” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hungarian

Etymology

From English fair.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛr], [ˈfɛːr]
  • Hyphenation: fair
  • Rhymes: -ɛr

Adjective

fair (comparative fairebb, superlative legfairebb)

  1. fair (just, equitable)
    Synonyms: méltányos, tisztességes, becsületes, igazságos, korrekt, sportszerű

Declension

Derived terms

  • fair play
  • fairül

Further reading

  • fair in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Irish

Etymology

See aire (watching, attention)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fˠaɾʲ]

Verb

fair (present analytic faireann, future analytic fairfidh, verbal noun faire, past participle fairthe)

  1. to watch

Conjugation

Mutation

References

  • MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911), “fair”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Stirling, →ISBN, page 160

Polish

Etymology

From English fair.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //fɛr//
  • Rhymes: -ɛr

Adjective

fair (not comparable)

  1. fair (just, equitable)
    Synonym: uczciwy

Declension

Indeclinable.

Adverb

fair (not comparable)

  1. fairly (in a fair manner)
    Synonym: uczciwie

Related terms

  • (noun) fair play

Further reading

  • fair in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • fair in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Saint Dominican Creole French

Etymology

From French faire (to do).

Verb

fair

  1. to do

Descendants

  • Haitian Creole:

References

  • S.J Ducoeurjoly, Manuel des habitans de Saint-Domingue, contenant un précis de l’histoire de cette île


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /d͡ʒʌst/
  • Rhymes: -ʌst

Etymology 1

From Middle English juste, from Old French juste, from Latin iūstus (just, lawful, rightful, true, due, proper, moderate), from Proto-Italic *jowestos, related to Latin iūs (law, right); ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-. Compare Scots juist (just), Saterland Frisian juust (just), West Frisian just (just), Dutch juist (just), German Low German jüst (jüst), German just (just), Danish just (just), Swedish just (just). Doublet of giusto.

Alternative forms

  • jes, jes’, jest, jist, jus’

Adjective

just (comparative juster or more just, superlative justest or most just)

  1. Factually right, correct; factual.
    It is a just assessment of the facts.
  2. Rationally right, correct.
  3. Morally right; upright, righteous, equitable; fair.
    It looks like a just solution at first glance.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act, Scene ,[1]
      My lord, we know your grace to be a man
      Just and upright.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Colossians 4:1,[2]
      Masters, give unto your servants that which is just and equal; knowing that ye also have a Master in heaven.
    • 1901, H. G. Wells, The First Men in the Moon, Chapter 23,[3]
      Looking back over my previously written account of these things, I must insist that I have been altogether juster to Cavor than he has been to me.
  4. Proper, adequate.
Synonyms
  • right, correct
  • righteous, equitable
  • proper, adequate
Antonyms
  • unjust
Derived terms
  • justly
  • justness
  • sleep of the just
Related terms
  • justice
Translations

Adverb

just (not comparable)

  1. Only, simply, merely.
  2. (sentence adverb) Used to reduce the force of an imperative; simply.
  3. Used to convey a less serious or formal tone
  4. Used to show humility.
  5. (degree) absolutely, positively
  6. Moments ago, recently.
  7. By a narrow margin; closely; nearly.
  8. Exactly, precisely, perfectly.
    • And having just enough, not covet more.
Synonyms
  • (only): merely, simply; see also Thesaurus:merely
  • (recently): freshly, lately, newly
  • (by a narrow margin): barely, hardly, scarcely; see also Thesaurus:slightly
  • (exactly): on the dot, smack-dab; see also Thesaurus:exactly
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

just

  1. (slang) Expressing dismay or discontent.

Etymology 2

Variation of joust, presumably ultimately from Latin iuxta (near, besides).

Noun

just (plural justs)

  1. A joust, tournament.

Verb

just (third-person singular simple present justs, present participle justing, simple past and past participle justed)

  1. To joust, fight a tournament.
Translations

References

  • just in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • just in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • UJTs, juts

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan, from Latin iūstus, jūstus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈʒust/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒust/

Adjective

just (feminine justa, masculine plural justs or justos, feminine plural justes)

  1. fair; just
    Antonym: injust
  2. perfect, almost perfect

Derived terms

  • justament
  • justesa
  • preu just
  • tot just

Related terms

  • injust
  • injustícia
  • justícia

Adverb

just

  1. justly

Further reading

  • “just” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “just” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “just” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “just” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Estonian

Etymology

From Middle Low German just or Swedish just. Possibly from German just. See also justament

Adverb

just

  1. exactly, precisely, just
    Sa tulid just parajal ajal.

    You came just at the right time.
  2. recently, just now, just
    Ma jõudsin just koju.

    I just got home.
  3. really (softens what has been said)
    Ta pole just töökas mees.

    He isn’t much of a worker.

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from Swedish just.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈjust/, [ˈjus̠t̪]
  • Rhymes: -ust
  • Syllabification: just

Adverb

just

  1. (colloquial, dialectal) just, exactly, precisely, perfectly
  2. (colloquial) recently, just now

Interjection

just

  1. (colloquial) I see, uh-huh, oh well

Synonyms

both:

  • aivan
  • juuri
  • justiin
  • justiinsa
  • justsa

adverb:

  • ihan
  • tarkalleen
  • täsmälleen

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin iūstus, jūstus.

Adjective

just

  1. just, right, correct, proper
  2. exact
  3. adequate
  4. apt

Derived terms

  • justeapont
  • justeben

Related terms

  • justâ
  • juste
  • justece
  • justificâ
  • justizie

German

Etymology

Latin iūste, iūstus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jʊst/

Adverb

just

  1. (solemn) just
    Synonyms: gerade, (archaic) justament

Further reading

  • “just” in Duden online
  • “just” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Latvian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [just]

Verb

just (tr., 1st conj., pres. jūtu, jūti, jūt, past jutu)

  1. to feel (to perceive with one’s sense organs)
  2. to sense
  3. to palp
  4. to have a sensation

Conjugation

Derived terms

prefixed verbs:
  • izjust
  • pajust
  • sajust
other derived terms:
  • justies

Old French

Verb

just

  1. third-person singular past historic of gesir

Romagnol

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʝi.ˈust/

Adjective

just m pl

  1. masculine plural of jóst

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French juste, Latin jūstus, iūstus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒust/

Adjective

just m or n (feminine singular justă, masculine plural juști, feminine and neuter plural juste)

  1. just, correct

Synonyms

  • drept, adevărat, echitabil

Swedish

Pronunciation

Adverb

just (not comparable)

  1. just; quite recently; only moments ago
  2. just; only, simply
  3. exactly, precisely
    Just nu

    Right now (At this precise moment)
    Det var just vad jag ville ha!

    That’s exactly what I wanted!

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