faith vs religion what difference

what is difference between faith and religion

English

Alternative forms

  • feith, feithe, fayth, faythe, faithe (all obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English faith, fayth, feith, feyth (also fay, fey, fei (“faith”); > English fay (faith)), borrowed from Old French fay, fey, fei, feit, feid (faith), from Latin fidēs (faith, belief, trust; whence also English fidelity), from fīdō (trust, confide in), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰidʰ-, zero-grade of *bʰeydʰ- (“to command, persuade, trust”; whence also English bide).
Displaced native Old English geleafa (faith, religion), which was a cognate of Dutch geloof (permission), which is survived in English leave (permission).

Old French had [θ] as a final devoiced allophone of /ð/ from lenited Latin /d/; this eventually fell silent in the 12th century. The -th of the Middle English forms is most straightforwardly accounted for as a direct borrowing of a French [θ]. However, it has also been seen as arising from alteration of a French form with -d under influence of English abstract nouns in the suffix -th (e.g. truth, ruth, health, etc.), or as a recharacterisation of a French form like fay, fey, fei with the same suffix, thus making the word equivalent to fay +‎ -th.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪθ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪθ

Noun

faith (countable and uncountable, plural faiths)

  1. A trust or confidence in the intentions or abilities of a person, object, or ideal from prior empirical evidence.
  2. A conviction about abstractions, ideas, or beliefs, without empirical evidence, experience, or observation.
  3. A religious or spiritual belief system.
    • For we are a nation of believers. Underneath the clamor of building and the rush of our day’s pursuits, we are believers in justice and liberty and union, and in our own Union. We believe that every man must someday be free. And we believe in ourselves.
      That is the mistake that our enemies have always made. In my lifetime–in depression and in war–they have awaited our defeat. Each time, from the secret places of the American heart, came forth the faith they could not see or that they could not even imagine. It brought us victory. And it will again.
  4. An obligation of loyalty or fidelity and the observance of such an obligation.
  5. (obsolete) Credibility or truth.
    • 1784-1810, William Mitford, History of Greece
      the faith of the foregoing [] narrative

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:faith.

Synonyms

  • (knowing, without direct observation, based on indirect evidence and experience, that something is true, real, or will happen): belief, confidence, trust, conviction
  • (system of religious belief): religion

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adverb

faith (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of in faith (really, truly)
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      Faith, friend,’ he says, ‘that was a nasty fall for a fellow that has supped weel. Where might your road be gaun to?’

References

  • faith at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • faith in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • faith in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • faith in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • hatif


English

Alternative forms

  • Religion

Etymology

From Middle English religioun, from Old French religion, from Latin religiō (scrupulousness, pious misgivings, superstition, conscientiousness, sanctity, an object of veneration, cult-observance, reverence). Most likely from the Indo-European root *h₂leg with the meanings preserved in Latin dīligere and legere (“to read repeatedly”, “to have something solely in mind”).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈlɪdʒən/
  • Rhymes: -ɪdʒən

Noun

religion (countable and uncountable, plural religions)

  1. (uncountable) Belief in a spiritual or metaphysical reality (often including at least one deity), accompanied by practices or rituals pertaining to the belief.
    Synonym: faith
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Lecture 2:
      Most books on the philosophy of religion try to begin with a precise definition of what its essence consists of. … I shall not be pedantic enough to enumerate any of them to you now. Meanwhile the very fact that they are so many and so different from one another is enough to prove that the word “religion” cannot stand for any single principle or essence, but is rather a collective name.
  2. (countable) A particular system of such belief, and the rituals and practices proper to it.
    Synonym: faith
    Hypernym: belief system
  3. (uncountable) The way of life committed to by monks and nuns.
  4. (uncountable, informal) Rituals and actions associated with religious beliefs, but considered apart from them.
    Synonym: (pejorative) superstition
  5. (countable) Any practice to which someone or some group is seriously devoted.
  6. (uncountable, obsolete) Faithfulness to a given principle; conscientiousness. [16th-17th c.]

Usage notes

  • Some prefer a definition of religion that includes only theistic groups, viewing non-theistic religions as merely philosophical systems.

Hyponyms

  • See also Thesaurus:religion

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

religion (third-person singular simple present religions, present participle religioning, simple past and past participle religioned)

  1. Engage in religious practice.
  2. Indoctrinate into a specific religion.
    • 1890, John R. Kelso, Deity analyzed: In six lectures – Page 37
      To men whose minds are thus religioned, tied back to gods that never advance, there can never be any such word as progress
  3. To make sacred or symbolic; sanctify.
    • 2011, Andrew O’Shea, Pedagogy, Oppression and Transformation in a ‘Post-Critical’ Climate, p 116
      The ideas expressed above challenge us to continuously rupture and interrupt racialized, classed, gendered, religioned and sexualized norms that inhere between and within institutions, understandings of bodies and our Selves.

See also

  • Appendix:Religions

References

  • religion at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • religion in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • religion in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • religion in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • ligroine, reoiling

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʁɛliɡˈjoˀn]

Noun

religion c (singular definite religionen, plural indefinite religioner)

  1. religion

Declension

Further reading

  • “religion” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “religion” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog

Esperanto

Noun

religion

  1. accusative singular of religio

French

Etymology

From Middle French religion, from Old French religion, borrowed from Latin religio, religionem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁə.li.ʒjɔ̃/
  • Hyphenation: re‧li‧gion

Noun

religion f (plural religions)

  1. religion

Synonyms

  • foi
  • culte
  • dévotion

Derived terms

See also

  • religieux
  • religieuse
  • religiosité

Further reading

  • “religion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Interlingua

Noun

religion (plural religiones)

  1. religion (system of belief, customs, etc.)

Ladin

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin religio, religionem.

Noun

religion m (plural [please provide])

  1. religion

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French religion.

Noun

religion f (plural religions)

  1. religion

Descendants

  • French: religion

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

religion m (definite singular religionen, indefinite plural religioner, definite plural religionene)

  1. religion

Synonyms

  • tro

Derived terms

  • religionsfrihet
  • statsreligion

Related terms

  • religiøs

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

religion m (definite singular religionen, indefinite plural religionar, definite plural religionane)

  1. religion

Derived terms

  • statsreligion

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin religiō.

Noun

religion f (oblique plural religions, nominative singular religion, nominative plural religions)

  1. religion

Related terms

  • religieus

Descendants

  • English: religion
  • French: religion
  • Norman: r’ligion
  • Middle Dutch: religie
    • Dutch: religie
      • Indonesian: religi

Papiamentu

Noun

religion

  1. religion

Piedmontese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /reliˈd͡ʒuŋ/

Noun

religion f

  1. religion

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɛlɪˈjuːn/

Noun

religion c

  1. religion

Declension

Related terms

  • religionsfrihet
  • religionskunskap
  • religionslärare
  • religionsvetare
  • religiös

See also

  • ateism
  • gud
  • konventikel
  • kyrklig
  • monoteism
  • relegera
  • religare
  • religio
  • teologi
  • tro

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