fake vs false what difference

what is difference between fake and false

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /feɪk/, enPR: fāk
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Etymology 1

The origin is not known with certainty, although first attested in 1775 C.E. in British criminals’ slang. It is probably from feak, feague (to give a better appearance through artificial means); akin to Dutch veeg (a slap), vegen (to sweep, wipe); German fegen (to sweep, to polish). Compare Old English fācn, fācen (deceit, fraud). Perhaps related to Old Norse fjúka (fade, vanquish, disappear), feikn (strange, scary, unnatural).

Adjective

fake (comparative faker or more fake, superlative fakest or most fake)

  1. Not real; false, fraudulent
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:fake
    Antonyms: authentic, genuine
  2. (of people) Insincere
Derived terms
  • fakely
  • fakeness
Translations

Noun

fake (plural fakes)

  1. Something which is not genuine, or is presented fraudulently.
    I suspect this passport is a fake.
  2. (sports) A move meant to deceive an opposing player, used for gaining advantage for example when dribbling an opponent.
  3. (archaic) A trick; a swindle
Synonyms
  • (soccer move): feint
  • (ice hockey move): deke
Translations

Verb

fake (third-person singular simple present fakes, present participle faking, simple past and past participle faked)

  1. (transitive) To make a counterfeit, to counterfeit, to forge, to falsify.
  2. (transitive) To make a false display of, to affect, to feign, to simulate.
  3. (archaic) To cheat; to swindle; to steal; to rob.
  4. (archaic) To modify fraudulently, so as to make an object appear better or other than it really is
  5. (music, transitive, intransitive) To improvise, in jazz.
    • 1994, ITA Journal (volume 22, page 20)
      Occasionally the opportunity arises to stand up and “fake” a jazz standard.
    • Denning, cited in 2020, Matt Brennan, Kick It: A Social History of the Drum Kit (page 110)
      In the face of this print music culture, ‘faking’ was the ability—at once respected and disrespected—to improvise a song (or a part in an arrangement) without reading the notation.
Synonyms
  • (modify fraudulently): adulterate
  • (make a false display): pass off, pose
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English faken (to coil a rope).

Noun

fake (plural fakes)

  1. (nautical) One of the circles or windings of a cable or hawser, as it lies in a coil; a single turn or coil.
Translations

Verb

fake (third-person singular simple present fakes, present participle faking, simple past and past participle faked)

  1. (nautical) To coil (a rope, line, or hawser), by winding alternately in opposite directions, in layers usually of zigzag or figure of eight form, to prevent twisting when running out.
Translations

Further reading

  • fake on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • fake at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • fake in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

References

Anagrams

  • feak

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌˈke/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ke

Verb

faké

  1. (transitive) open

Conjugation

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 275

Kristang

Noun

fake

  1. knife

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English fake.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfejk(i)/

Noun

fake m (plural fakes)

  1. (Internet slang) a fake account in a social network or other online community; a sock puppet

Adjective

fake (invariable, comparable)

  1. (Internet slang, of an image or video shared on the web) fake, manipulated, not genuine
    Synonym: falso
    Antonyms: genuíno, real, autêntico


English

Etymology

From Middle English false, fals, from Old English fals (false; counterfeit; fraudulent; wrong; mistaken), from Latin falsus (counterfeit, false; falsehood), perfect passive participle of fallō (deceive). Reinforced in Middle English by Anglo-Norman and Old French fals, faus. Compare Scots fals, false, Saterland Frisian falsk, German falsch, Dutch vals, Swedish and Danish falsk; all from Latin falsus. Displaced native Middle English les, lese, from Old English lēas (false); See lease, leasing. Doublet of faux.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General New Zealand, General Australian) IPA(key): /fɔːls/, /fɒls/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔls/, /fɑls/

Adjective

false (comparative falser, superlative falsest)

  1. Untrue, not factual, factually incorrect.
  2. Based on factually incorrect premises.
  3. Spurious, artificial.
  4. (logic) Of a state in Boolean logic that indicates a negative result.
  5. Uttering falsehood; dishonest or deceitful.
  6. Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous.
  7. Not well founded; not firm or trustworthy; erroneous.
  8. Not essential or permanent, as parts of a structure which are temporary or supplemental.
  9. Used in the vernacular name of a species (or group of species) together with the name of another species to which it is similar in appearance.
  10. (music) Out of tune.

Synonyms

  • lease
  • See also Thesaurus:false

Antonyms

  • (untrue): real, true

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

false (third-person singular simple present falses, present participle falsing, simple past and past participle falsed)

  1. (electronics, telecommunications, of a decoder) To incorrectly decode noise as if it were a valid signal.

Adverb

false (comparative more false, superlative most false)

  1. In a dishonest and disloyal way; falsely.

Noun

false (plural falses)

  1. One of two options on a true-or-false test.

Anagrams

  • A.S.L.E.F., Leafs, alefs, fasel, feals, fleas, leafs, lefsa

Italian

Adjective

false f pl

  1. feminine plural of falso

Latin

Noun

false

  1. vocative singular of falsus

References

  • false in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • false in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • false in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Spanish

Verb

false

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of falsar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of falsar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of falsar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of falsar.

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