fall vs hang what difference

what is difference between fall and hang

English

Etymology 1

Verb from Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan (to fall, fail, decay, die, attack), from Proto-West Germanic *fallan (to fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-.

Cognate with West Frisian falle (to fall), Low German fallen (to fall), Dutch vallen (to fall), German fallen (to fall), Norwegian Bokmål falle (to fall), Norwegian Nynorsk falla (to fall), Icelandic falla (to fall), Albanian fal (forgive, pray, salute, greet), Lithuanian pùlti (to attack, rush).

Noun from Middle English fal, fall, falle, from Old English feall, ġefeall (a falling, fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallą, *fallaz (a fall, trap), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-. Cognate with Dutch val, German Fall, Swedish fall, Icelandic fall.

Sense of “autumn” is attested by the 1660s in England as a shortening of Middle English fall of the leaf (1540s), from the falling of leaves during this season. Along with autumn, it mostly replaced the older name harvest as that name began to be associated strictly with the act of harvesting. Compare spring, which began as a shortening of “spring of the leaf”.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔːl/
  • (General American) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔl/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: fäl, IPA(key): /fɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl

Verb

fall (third-person singular simple present falls, present participle falling, simple past fell or (in archaic sense only) felled, past participle fallen or (in archaic sense only) felled)

  1. (heading, intransitive) To be moved downwards.
    1. To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
      • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    2. To come down, to drop or descend.
      • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond, Ch.1:
        Her eyes fell on the table, and she advanced into the room wiping her hands on her apron.
    3. To come as if by dropping down.
      • 1898, William Le Queux, Whoso Findeth a Wife, page 256:
        Once or twice a noise fell upon his quick ear, and we halted, he standing revolver in hand in an attitude of defense. Each time, however, we ascertained that we had no occasion for alarm, the noise being made by some animal or bird  …
      • 1904, Bram Stoker, The Jewel of Seven Stars, page 248:
        And then a sudden calm fell on us like a cloud of fear. There! on the table, lay the Jewel of Seven Stars, shining and sparkling with lurid light, as though each of the seven points of each of the seven stars gleamed through blood!
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N [] dark clouds closing in over everything. At 3 in the afternoon the breeze came up from the S with a thick drizzle. Thus night fell, and thus we passed the rest of it.
      • 1981, Dan Kirby, Schreiber’s Choice, Ace Books (→ISBN)
        The horse wrangler, a tall, bronzed-face man, waved to the wagon driver. The driver laughed. [] The canvas cover rolled up suddenly and a terrible noise fell over the desert.
    4. To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
    5. To be brought to the ground.
  2. (transitive) To move downwards.
    1. (obsolete) To let fall; to drop.
    2. (obsolete) To sink; to depress.
    3. (Britain, US, dialect, archaic) To fell; to cut down.
  3. (intransitive) To change, often negatively.
    1. (copulative, in idiomatic expressions) To become.
      • At length they stood at the corner from which they had begun, and it had fallen quite dark, and they were no wiser.
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N and then it fell calm, []
    2. (intransitive) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
    3. (intransitive, formal, euphemistic) To die, especially in battle or by disease.
    4. (intransitive) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc.).
      • 1612, John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
        The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
      • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Vol.1, pp.284-5:
        Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  4. To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); to happen.
    • 1978, Dwight David Eisenhower, Mamie Doud Eisenhower, Letters to Mamie, Doubleday Books:
      (Thus D-day fell on June 6 rather than the planned June 5.)
  5. (intransitive) To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To diminish; to lessen or lower.
    • Upon lessening interest to four per cent, you fall the price of your native commodities.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forth.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; said of the young of certain animals.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  9. (intransitive) To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
    • Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.
  10. (intransitive) To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.
  11. (intransitive) To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
    • Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
    • I have observed of late thy looks are fallen.
  12. (intransitive) To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
    • Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 2
      [] An the worst fall that ever fell, I hope I shall make shift to go without him.
    • 1879, Herbert Spenser, Principles of Sociology Volume II – Part IV: Ceremonial Institutions
      Primitive men [] do not make laws, they fall into customs.
  13. (intransitive) To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett (Thucydides)
      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul.
  14. (intransitive) To be dropped or uttered carelessly.
  15. (intransitive, of a fabric) To hang down (under the influence of gravity).
Quotations
  • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of King Richard the third, Andrew Wiſe (publisher, 1598 — second quarto), Act V, Scene 3:
    Ghoaſt [of Clarence]. [] / To morrow in the battaile thinke on me, / And fall thy edgeleſſe ſword, diſpaire and die.
Synonyms
  • (move to a lower position under the effect of gravity): drop, plummet, plunge
  • (come down): come down, descend, drop
  • (come to the ground deliberately): drop, lower oneself, prostrate oneself
  • (be brought to the ground):
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): be beaten by, be defeated by, be overthrown by, be smitten by, be vanquished by,
  • (die): die
  • (be allotted to): be the responsibility of, be up to
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): dip, drop
  • (become): become, get
  • (cause (something) to descend to the ground): cut down (of a tree), fell, knock down, knock over, strike down
Antonyms
  • (come down): ascend, go up, rise
  • (come to the ground deliberately): get up, pick oneself up, stand up
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): beat, defeat, overthrow, smite, vanquish
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): rise
Coordinate terms
  • topple
  • tumble
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

fall (countable and uncountable, plural falls)

  1. The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  2. A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
    • “I’m through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  3. (chiefly Canada, US, archaic in Britain) The time of the year when the leaves typically fall from the trees; autumn; the season of the year between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. [from 16th c.]
  4. A loss of greatness or status.
  5. That which falls or cascades.
  6. (sports) A crucial event or circumstance.
    1. (cricket, of a wicket) The action of a batsman being out.
    2. (curling) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
    3. (wrestling) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
  7. A hairpiece for women consisting of long strands of hair on a woven backing, intended primarily to cover hair loss.
  8. (informal, US) Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.
  9. The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting (usu. plural).
  10. An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.
  11. A short, flexible piece of leather forming part of a bullwhip, placed between the thong and the cracker.
  12. The lid, on a piano, that covers the keyboard
Synonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position): descent, drop
  • (reduction): decrease, dip, drop, lowering, reduction
  • (season): autumn, (UK dialect) harvest, (UK dialect) back end
  • (loss of greatness or status): downfall
  • (blame; punishment): rap
Antonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity): ascent, rise
  • (reduction): increase, rise
  • (loss of greatness or status): ascent, rise
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See also

  • falls

Etymology 2

Perhaps from the north-eastern Scottish pronunciation of whale.

Interjection

fall

  1. (nautical) The cry given when a whale is sighted, or harpooned.

Noun

fall (plural falls)

  1. (nautical) The chasing of a hunted whale.
Derived terms
  • loose fall

Albanian

Etymology

From Turkish fal, from Arabic فَأْل(faʾl, omen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɫ/

Noun

fall m (indefinite plural falle, definite singular falli, definite plural fallet)

  1. fortune telling

Declension

Derived terms

References


Breton

Adjective

fall

  1. bad

Catalan

Etymology

From fallir.

Noun

fall m (plural falls)

  1. cliff

Related terms

  • falla

Further reading

  • “fall” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/

Noun

fall n (genitive singular fals, plural føll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. case (linguistics)

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fal/
  • Rhymes: -al

Verb

fall

  1. singular imperative of fallen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of fallen

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/
  • Rhymes: -atl

Noun

fall n (genitive singular falls, nominative plural föll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. (grammar) case
  3. (computing, programming) function; (subprogram, usually with formal parameters, returning a data value when called)
  4. indefinite accusative singular of fall

Declension

Synonyms

  • (function): fallstefja

Derived terms

See also

  • falla (verb)

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla or fallene)

  1. a fall
  2. case
    i fall – in case
    i alle fall – in any case

Derived terms

Related terms

  • falle (verb)

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɑlː/

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla)

  1. a fall
  2. case

Derived terms

Verb

fall

  1. past tense of falle
  2. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

Noun

fall n

  1. a fall (the act of falling)
  2. a fall, loss of greatness or wealth, a bankruptcy
  3. a slope, a waterfall, the height of a slope or waterfall
  4. a (legal) case

Declension

Related terms

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falla.

References

  • fall in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hăng, IPA(key): /hæŋ/
    • (General American, Canada) IPA(key): (see /æ/ raising) [heɪŋ]
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1

A fusion of Old English hōn (to hang, be hanging) [intrans.] and hangian (to hang, cause to hang) [trans.]; also probably influenced by Old Norse hengja (suspend) and hanga (be suspended); all from Proto-Germanic *hanhaną (compare Dutch hangen, Low German hangen and hängen, German hängen, Norwegian Bokmål henge, Norwegian Nynorsk henga), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱenk- (to waver, be in suspense) (compare Gothic ???????????????????? (hāhan), Hittite [Term?] (/gang-/, to hang), Sanskrit शङ्कते (śáṅkate, is in doubt, hesitates), Latin cunctari (to delay)).

Verb

hang (third-person singular simple present hangs, present participle hanging, simple past and past participle hung or (legal) hanged)

  1. (intransitive) To be or remain suspended.
    • On the dark-green walls hung a series of eight engravings, portraits of early Victorian belles, clad in lace and tarletan ball dresses, clipped from an old Book of Beauty. Mrs. Bunting was very fond of these pictures; she thought they gave the drawing-room a note of elegance and refinement.
  2. (intransitive) To float, as if suspended.
  3. (intransitive) To veer in one direction.
    • 1979, New South Wales law reports (page 16)
      The jockey claimed that the horse hung towards the outside
  4. (intransitive, of a ball in cricket, tennis, etc.) To rebound unexpectedly or unusually slowly, due to backward spin on the ball or imperfections of the ground.
  5. (transitive) To hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect.
  6. (transitive) To cause (something) to be suspended, as from a hook, hanger, hinges, or the like.
    It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come! It were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea, than that he should offend one of these little ones.
  7. (transitive, law) To execute (someone) by suspension from the neck.
  8. (intransitive, law) To be executed by suspension by one’s neck from a gallows, a tree, or other raised bar, attached by a rope tied into a noose.
  9. (transitive, informal) (used in maledictions) To damn.
  10. (intransitive, informal) To loiter; to hang around; to spend time idly.
    • 2006, Scuba Diving (issues 1-6, page 49)
      He banned spearfishing wherever he could, started the first eco-moorings in the Caribbean, stopped others from coral- and shell-collecting, and had so much fun 24/7 that some unusually powerful people began to hang with him.
  11. (transitive) To exhibit (an object) by hanging.
  12. (transitive) To apply (wallpaper or drywall to a wall).
  13. (transitive) To decorate (something) with hanging objects.
  14. (intransitive, figuratively) To remain persistently in one’s thoughts.
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine, Ch.X:
      Exploring, I found another short gallery running transversely to the first. This appeared to be devoted to minerals, and the sight of a block of sulphur set my mind running on gunpowder. But I could find no saltpeter; indeed no nitrates of any kind. Doubtless they had deliquesced ages ago. Yet the sulphur hung in my mind and set up a train of thinking.
  15. (transitive) To prevent from reaching a decision, especially by refusing to join in a verdict that must be unanimous.
    One obstinate juror can hang a jury.
  16. (intransitive, computing) To stop responding to manual input devices such as keyboard and mouse.
  17. (transitive, computing) To cause (a program or computer) to stop responding.
  18. (transitive, chess) To cause (a piece) to become vulnerable to capture.
  19. (intransitive, chess) To be vulnerable to capture.
  20. (transitive, baseball, slang) Of a pitcher, to throw a hittable off-speed pitch.
    • 2010, Peter Golenbock, Dynasty: The New York Yankees, 1949-1964, →ISBN, page 409
      McDougald then singled, and with a 3-2 count on Ellie Howard who was playing first base, Spahn hung a curve ball and Howard hit it over the wire fence in left field for a 4-4 tie.
  21. (transitive, figuratively) To attach or cause to stick (a charge or accusation, etc.).
    • 1848, The American Pulpit (volume 3, page 120)
      There were no whisperings, even from his opponents, that he was no better than he ought to be. Because, there was nothing wrong on which to hang a charge. As an eloquent orator, he carried with him the firm support of a good name.
Usage notes
  • Formerly, at least until the 16th century, the past tense of the transitive use of hang was hanged (see quote from King James Bible, above). This form is retained for the legal senses “to be executed by suspension from the neck” and “to execute by suspension from the neck”, with hung used for all other meanings. hung is sometimes also used in the legal senses, but is proscribed in legal or other formal writing (for those senses). Rarely, hanged is used for non-legal senses as well, which is also proscribed. See also the etymology.
Synonyms
  • (be or remain suspended): be suspended, dangle
  • (float as if suspended): float, hover
  • (execute (someone) by suspension from the neck): lynch, string up; see also Thesaurus:kill by hanging
  • (be executed): go to the gallows, swing (informal), take a ride to Tyburn (archaic); see also Thesaurus:die by hanging
  • (loiter): hang about, hang around, loiter
  • (computing: stop responding): freeze, lock up
  • (cause (something) to be suspended): suspend
  • (hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect): drop, lower
  • (to place on a hook): hook, hook up
  • (to put a telephone handset back on a hook): hang up
  • (exhibit): exhibit, show
  • (apply (wallpaper to a wall)): put up
  • (decorate (something) with hanging objects): bedeck, deck, decorate
  • (computing: cause (a program or computer) to stop responding): freeze, lock up
  • (in chess: cause to become vulnerable to capture):
  • (in chess: be vulnerable to capture):
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

hang (plural hangs)

  1. The way in which something hangs.
    This skirt has a nice hang.
  2. (colloquial, figuratively) A grip, understanding.
    He got the hang of it after only two demonstrations.
    • 1911, Alexander MacDonald, The Invisible Island: A Story of the Far North of Queensland (page 105)
      “I don’t see the hang of so much talky-talky,” broke in Uncle Sam. “We’ve heard all that can be said about things, []
  3. (computing) An instance of ceasing to respond to input.
    We sometimes get system hangs.
  4. A sharp or steep declivity or slope.
  5. A mass of hanging material.
    • 2014, Matthew Jobin, The Nethergrim (volume 1)
      They advanced in a crouch, dropping to their knees every few yards to pass under a hang of rock.
  6. (colloquial) The smallest amount of concern or consideration; a damn.
    I don’t give a hang.
    They don’t seem to care a hang about the consequences.
Derived terms
  • get the hang of

Etymology 2

From hang sangwich, Irish colloquial pronunciation of ham sandwich.

Noun

hang (uncountable)

  1. (Ireland, informal, derogatory) Cheap processed ham (cured pork), often made specially for sandwiches.

Etymology 3

Noun

hang

  1. Alternative spelling of Hang (musical instrument)

Anagrams

  • Ghan

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦaŋ/

Etymology 1

From Dutch hangen, a merger of Middle Dutch hangen and {[m|dum|haen}}.

Verb

hang (present hang, present participle hangende, past participle gehang)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) to hang

Etymology 2

From Dutch hang.

Noun

hang (plural hange)

  1. slope
Synonyms
  • helling

Bahnar

Etymology

From Proto-Central Bahnaric *haːŋ, from Chamic. Compare Eastern Cham ꨨꩃ (hang).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːŋ/

Noun

hang 

  1. bank, shore

Cebuano

Alternative forms

  • halang

Adjective

hang

  1. hot; pungent; spicy

Danish

Pronunciation

IPA(key): [ˈhɑŋˀ]

  • Rhymes: -ɑŋˀ

Etymology 1

From German Hang, a noun derived from hangen, from Proto-Germanic *hanhaną.

Noun

hang c (singular definite hangen, not used in plural form)

  1. inclination or disposition towards something

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

hang

  1. past tense of hænge

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑŋ
  • IPA(key): /ɦɑŋ/

Noun

hang c (plural hangen, diminutive hangetje n)

  1. A support for hanging objects, such as a nail for a picture frame
  2. A place to dry or smoke produce
  3. A tendency, knack

Related terms

  • hangijzer n

Verb

hang

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hangen
  2. imperative of hangen

Estonian

Etymology

Related to Finnish hanko.

Noun

hang (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. fork

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading

  • hang in Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat

Hungarian

Etymology

From an unattested stem with the suffix -g.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒŋɡ]
  • Rhymes: -ɒŋɡ

Noun

hang (plural hangok)

  1. voice
  2. sound

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • hang in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Irish

Noun

hang f

  1. h-prothesized form of ang

Italian

Noun

hang m (invariable)

  1. (music) Hang

Malay

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /häŋ/

Pronoun

hang (Jawi spelling هڠ‎)

  1. (dialectal) (object pronoun) The people spoken, or written to, as an object.
  2. (dialectal) (subject pronoun) The people spoken to or written to, as a subject.

Synonyms

  • awak / اوق
  • kamu / کامو
  • kau / کاو
  • anda / اندا
  • engkau / اڠکاو

Further reading

  • “hang” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

Mandarin

Romanization

hang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of hāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of háng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of hǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of hàng.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

hang

  1. (intransitive) simple past of henge

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

hang

  1. past of henga

Ternate

Adverb

hang

  1. not yet

References

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001). A Descriptive Study of the Language of Ternate, the Northern Moluccas, Indonesia. University of Pittsburgh.

Vietnamese

Etymology

From Proto-Vietic *haːŋ (cave). Possibly related to the word reconstructed as Proto-Mon-Khmer *ʔaaŋ (to open) by Shorto (2006).

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [haːŋ˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [haːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [haːŋ˧˧]

Noun

(classifier cái) hang • (????, ????, ????, ????, ????)

  1. cave
    Synonym: động
  2. den

Derived terms


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