fall vs light what difference

what is difference between fall and light

English

Etymology 1

Verb from Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan (to fall, fail, decay, die, attack), from Proto-West Germanic *fallan (to fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-.

Cognate with West Frisian falle (to fall), Low German fallen (to fall), Dutch vallen (to fall), German fallen (to fall), Norwegian Bokmål falle (to fall), Norwegian Nynorsk falla (to fall), Icelandic falla (to fall), Albanian fal (forgive, pray, salute, greet), Lithuanian pùlti (to attack, rush).

Noun from Middle English fal, fall, falle, from Old English feall, ġefeall (a falling, fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallą, *fallaz (a fall, trap), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-. Cognate with Dutch val, German Fall, Swedish fall, Icelandic fall.

Sense of “autumn” is attested by the 1660s in England as a shortening of Middle English fall of the leaf (1540s), from the falling of leaves during this season. Along with autumn, it mostly replaced the older name harvest as that name began to be associated strictly with the act of harvesting. Compare spring, which began as a shortening of “spring of the leaf”.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔːl/
  • (General American) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔl/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: fäl, IPA(key): /fɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl

Verb

fall (third-person singular simple present falls, present participle falling, simple past fell or (in archaic sense only) felled, past participle fallen or (in archaic sense only) felled)

  1. (heading, intransitive) To be moved downwards.
    1. To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
      • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    2. To come down, to drop or descend.
      • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond, Ch.1:
        Her eyes fell on the table, and she advanced into the room wiping her hands on her apron.
    3. To come as if by dropping down.
      • 1898, William Le Queux, Whoso Findeth a Wife, page 256:
        Once or twice a noise fell upon his quick ear, and we halted, he standing revolver in hand in an attitude of defense. Each time, however, we ascertained that we had no occasion for alarm, the noise being made by some animal or bird  …
      • 1904, Bram Stoker, The Jewel of Seven Stars, page 248:
        And then a sudden calm fell on us like a cloud of fear. There! on the table, lay the Jewel of Seven Stars, shining and sparkling with lurid light, as though each of the seven points of each of the seven stars gleamed through blood!
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N [] dark clouds closing in over everything. At 3 in the afternoon the breeze came up from the S with a thick drizzle. Thus night fell, and thus we passed the rest of it.
      • 1981, Dan Kirby, Schreiber’s Choice, Ace Books (→ISBN)
        The horse wrangler, a tall, bronzed-face man, waved to the wagon driver. The driver laughed. [] The canvas cover rolled up suddenly and a terrible noise fell over the desert.
    4. To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
    5. To be brought to the ground.
  2. (transitive) To move downwards.
    1. (obsolete) To let fall; to drop.
    2. (obsolete) To sink; to depress.
    3. (Britain, US, dialect, archaic) To fell; to cut down.
  3. (intransitive) To change, often negatively.
    1. (copulative, in idiomatic expressions) To become.
      • At length they stood at the corner from which they had begun, and it had fallen quite dark, and they were no wiser.
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N and then it fell calm, []
    2. (intransitive) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
    3. (intransitive, formal, euphemistic) To die, especially in battle or by disease.
    4. (intransitive) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc.).
      • 1612, John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
        The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
      • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Vol.1, pp.284-5:
        Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  4. To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); to happen.
    • 1978, Dwight David Eisenhower, Mamie Doud Eisenhower, Letters to Mamie, Doubleday Books:
      (Thus D-day fell on June 6 rather than the planned June 5.)
  5. (intransitive) To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To diminish; to lessen or lower.
    • Upon lessening interest to four per cent, you fall the price of your native commodities.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forth.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; said of the young of certain animals.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  9. (intransitive) To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
    • Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.
  10. (intransitive) To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.
  11. (intransitive) To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
    • Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
    • I have observed of late thy looks are fallen.
  12. (intransitive) To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
    • Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 2
      [] An the worst fall that ever fell, I hope I shall make shift to go without him.
    • 1879, Herbert Spenser, Principles of Sociology Volume II – Part IV: Ceremonial Institutions
      Primitive men [] do not make laws, they fall into customs.
  13. (intransitive) To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett (Thucydides)
      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul.
  14. (intransitive) To be dropped or uttered carelessly.
  15. (intransitive, of a fabric) To hang down (under the influence of gravity).
Quotations
  • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of King Richard the third, Andrew Wiſe (publisher, 1598 — second quarto), Act V, Scene 3:
    Ghoaſt [of Clarence]. [] / To morrow in the battaile thinke on me, / And fall thy edgeleſſe ſword, diſpaire and die.
Synonyms
  • (move to a lower position under the effect of gravity): drop, plummet, plunge
  • (come down): come down, descend, drop
  • (come to the ground deliberately): drop, lower oneself, prostrate oneself
  • (be brought to the ground):
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): be beaten by, be defeated by, be overthrown by, be smitten by, be vanquished by,
  • (die): die
  • (be allotted to): be the responsibility of, be up to
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): dip, drop
  • (become): become, get
  • (cause (something) to descend to the ground): cut down (of a tree), fell, knock down, knock over, strike down
Antonyms
  • (come down): ascend, go up, rise
  • (come to the ground deliberately): get up, pick oneself up, stand up
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): beat, defeat, overthrow, smite, vanquish
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): rise
Coordinate terms
  • topple
  • tumble
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

fall (countable and uncountable, plural falls)

  1. The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  2. A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
    • “I’m through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  3. (chiefly Canada, US, archaic in Britain) The time of the year when the leaves typically fall from the trees; autumn; the season of the year between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. [from 16th c.]
  4. A loss of greatness or status.
  5. That which falls or cascades.
  6. (sports) A crucial event or circumstance.
    1. (cricket, of a wicket) The action of a batsman being out.
    2. (curling) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
    3. (wrestling) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
  7. A hairpiece for women consisting of long strands of hair on a woven backing, intended primarily to cover hair loss.
  8. (informal, US) Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.
  9. The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting (usu. plural).
  10. An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.
  11. A short, flexible piece of leather forming part of a bullwhip, placed between the thong and the cracker.
  12. The lid, on a piano, that covers the keyboard
Synonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position): descent, drop
  • (reduction): decrease, dip, drop, lowering, reduction
  • (season): autumn, (UK dialect) harvest, (UK dialect) back end
  • (loss of greatness or status): downfall
  • (blame; punishment): rap
Antonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity): ascent, rise
  • (reduction): increase, rise
  • (loss of greatness or status): ascent, rise
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See also

  • falls

Etymology 2

Perhaps from the north-eastern Scottish pronunciation of whale.

Interjection

fall

  1. (nautical) The cry given when a whale is sighted, or harpooned.

Noun

fall (plural falls)

  1. (nautical) The chasing of a hunted whale.
Derived terms
  • loose fall

Albanian

Etymology

From Turkish fal, from Arabic فَأْل(faʾl, omen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɫ/

Noun

fall m (indefinite plural falle, definite singular falli, definite plural fallet)

  1. fortune telling

Declension

Derived terms

References


Breton

Adjective

fall

  1. bad

Catalan

Etymology

From fallir.

Noun

fall m (plural falls)

  1. cliff

Related terms

  • falla

Further reading

  • “fall” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/

Noun

fall n (genitive singular fals, plural føll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. case (linguistics)

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fal/
  • Rhymes: -al

Verb

fall

  1. singular imperative of fallen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of fallen

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/
  • Rhymes: -atl

Noun

fall n (genitive singular falls, nominative plural föll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. (grammar) case
  3. (computing, programming) function; (subprogram, usually with formal parameters, returning a data value when called)
  4. indefinite accusative singular of fall

Declension

Synonyms

  • (function): fallstefja

Derived terms

See also

  • falla (verb)

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla or fallene)

  1. a fall
  2. case
    i fall – in case
    i alle fall – in any case

Derived terms

Related terms

  • falle (verb)

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɑlː/

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla)

  1. a fall
  2. case

Derived terms

Verb

fall

  1. past tense of falle
  2. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

Noun

fall n

  1. a fall (the act of falling)
  2. a fall, loss of greatness or wealth, a bankruptcy
  3. a slope, a waterfall, the height of a slope or waterfall
  4. a (legal) case

Declension

Related terms

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falla.

References

  • fall in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)


English

Alternative forms

  • lite (informal or archaic); lighte, lyght, lyghte (obsolete)
  • licht (Scotland)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: līt, IPA(key): /laɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): [ɫɐɪ̯ʔ]
  • (Canada, regional US) IPA(key): /lʌɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophone: lite
  • Hyphenation: light

Etymology 1

From Middle English light, liht, leoht, from Old English lēoht, from Proto-West Germanic *leuht, from Proto-Germanic *leuhtą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewktom, from the root *lewk- (light).

Noun

light (countable and uncountable, plural lights)

  1. (physics, uncountable) Visible electromagnetic radiation. The human eye can typically detect radiation (light) in the wavelength range of about 400 to 750 nanometers. Nearby shorter and longer wavelength ranges, although not visible, are commonly called ultraviolet and infrared light.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      When the studio light is on, I am recording my evening show.

  2. A source of illumination.
  3. Spiritual or mental illumination; enlightenment, useful information.
  4. (in the plural, now rare) Facts; pieces of information; ideas, concepts.
    • , Book I, New York 2001, page 166:
      Now these notions are twofold, actions or habits […], which are durable lights and notions, which we may use when we will.
  5. A notable person within a specific field or discipline.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, A Dream of Fair Women
      Joan of Arc, a light of ancient France
  6. (painting) The manner in which the light strikes a picture; that part of a picture which represents those objects upon which the light is supposed to fall; the more illuminated part of a landscape or other scene; opposed to shade.
  7. A point of view, or aspect from which a concept, person or thing is regarded.
    • , “Why Christ’s Doctrine was Rejected by the Jews”
      Frequent consideration of a thing [] shows it in its several lights and various ways of appearance.
    • Now if there was one thing that the animals were completely certain of, it was that they did not want Jones back. When it was put to them in this light, they had no more to say.
  8. A flame or something used to create fire.
  9. A firework made by filling a case with a substance which burns brilliantly with a white or coloured flame.
    a Bengal light
  10. A window, or space for a window in architecture.
  11. The series of squares reserved for the answer to a crossword clue.
  12. (informal) A cross-light in a double acrostic or triple acrostic.
  13. Open view; a visible state or condition; public observation; publicity.
  14. The power of perception by vision.
  15. The brightness of the eye or eyes.
  16. A traffic light, or, by extension, an intersection controlled by one or more that will face a traveler who is receiving instructions.
Synonyms
  • (electromagnetic wave perceived by the eye): visible light
  • See also Thesaurus:light source
Hypernyms
  • (physics): electromagnetic radiation
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Gulf Arabic: ليت(lēt)
  • Farefare: laatɩ
  • Sranan Tongo: leti
Translations

See light/translations § Noun.

References

  • light on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English lighten, lihten, from Old English līhtan, lȳhtan, lēohtan (to lighten, illuminate, give light, shine; grow light, dawn; light, kindle), from Proto-Germanic *liuhtijaną, from *leuhtą +‎ *-janą. Cognate with German leuchten (to shine).

Verb

light (third-person singular simple present lights, present participle lighting, simple past and past participle lit or lighted)

  1. (transitive) To start (a fire).
    Synonym: set
    Antonyms: extinguish, put out, quench
    We lit the fire to get some heat.
  2. (transitive) To set fire to; to set burning.
    Synonyms: ignite, kindle, conflagrate
    Antonyms: extinguish, put out, quench
    She lit her last match.
    • 1627, George Hakewill, Apologie [] of the Power and Providence of God
      if a thousand candles be all lighted from one
  3. (transitive) To illuminate; to provide light for when it is dark.
    Synonyms: illuminate, light up
    I used my torch to light the way home through the woods in the night.
    • 19th century’, Frederic Harrison, The Fortnightly Review
      One hundred years ago, to have lit this theatre as brilliantly as it is now lighted would have cost, I suppose, fifty pounds.
    • The Sun has set, and Vesper, to supply / His absent beams, had lighted up the sky.
  4. (intransitive) To become ignited; to take fire.
    Synonyms: catch fire, ignite, conflagrate
    This soggy match will not light.
  5. To attend or conduct with a light; to show the way to by means of a light.
    • 1824, Walter Savage Landor, Imaginary Conversations, Richard I and the Abbot of Boxley
      His bishops lead him forth, and light him on.
  6. (transitive, pinball) To make (a bonus) available to be collected by hitting a target, and thus light up the feature light corresponding to that bonus to indicate its availability.
    Light the extra ball by amassing 500 million points in the wizard mode.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English light, liht, leoht, from Old English lēoht (luminous, bright, light, clear, resplendent, renowned, beautiful), from Proto-Germanic *leuhtaz (light), from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light). Cognate with Saterland Frisian ljoacht (light), Dutch licht, German licht.

Adjective

light (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Having light; bright; clear; not dark or obscure.
  2. Pale or whitish in color; highly luminous and more or less deficient in chroma.
  3. (of coffee) Served with extra milk or cream.
Synonyms
  • (having light): bright, lightful
  • (pale in colour): pale
  • (coffee: served with extra milk or cream): white, with milk, with cream
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Old English lēoht, līht, from Proto-West Germanic *lį̄ht, from Proto-Germanic *linhtaz or *līhtaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʷʰ- (light).

Cognate with Dutch licht, German leicht, Swedish lätt, Norwegian lett, Albanian lehtë, Latin levis, Russian лёгкий (ljóxkij), Lithuanian lengvas, Sanskrit लघु (laghu).

Adjective

light (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Having little or relatively little actual weight; not cumbrous or unwieldy.
    • These weights did not exert their natural gravity [] insomuch that I could not guess which was light or heavy whilst I held them in my hand.
  2. Having little weight as compared with bulk; of little density or specific gravity.
  3. Of short or insufficient weight; weighing less than the legal, standard, or proper amount; clipped or diminished.
  4. Lacking that which burdens or makes heavy.
    1. Free from burden or impediment; unencumbered.
    2. Lightly built; typically designed for speed or small loads.
    3. (military) Not heavily armed; armed with light weapons.
    4. (nautical, of a ship) Riding high because of no cargo; by extension, pertaining to a ship which is light.
    5. (rail transport, of a locomotive or consist of locomotives) Without any piece of equipment attached or attached only to a caboose.
    6. With low viscosity.
  5. (cooking) Not heavy or soggy; spongy; well raised.
  6. Gentle; having little force or momentum.
    This artist clearly had a light, flowing touch.
  7. Easy to endure or perform.
    light duties around the house
    • Light sufferings give us leisure to complain.
  8. Low in fat, calories, alcohol, salt, etc.
    This light beer still gets you drunk if you have enough of it.
  9. Unimportant, trivial, having little value or significance.
    I made some light comment, and we moved on.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      He had drunk more than was fit for him, and he was singing some light song, when he saw approaching, as he said, the pale horse mentioned in the Revelation, with Death seated as the rider.
  10. (obsolete) Unchaste, wanton.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.i:
      Long after lay he musing at her mood, / Much grieu’d to thinke that gentle Dame so light, / For whose defence he was to shed his blood.
  11. Not encumbered; unembarrassed; clear of impediments; hence, active; nimble; swift.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Marriage and Single Life
      Unmarried men are best friends, best masters [] but not always best subjects, for they are light to run away.
  12. (dated) Easily influenced by trifling considerations; unsteady; unsettled; volatile.
    a light, vain person; a light mind
    • 1633, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of being Religious
      There is no greater argument of a light and inconsiderate person than profanely to scoff at religion.
  13. Indulging in, or inclined to, levity; lacking dignity or solemnity; frivolous; airy.
    Ogden Nash was a writer of light verse.
    • 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Old News
      specimens of New England humour laboriously light and lamentably mirthful
  14. Not quite sound or normal; somewhat impaired or deranged; dizzy; giddy.
  15. Easily interrupted by stimulation.
    light sleep; light anesthesia
Synonyms
  • (of little weight):
  • (lightly-built): lightweight
  • (having little force or momentum): delicate, gentle, soft
  • (low in fat, calories, etc): lite, lo-cal (low in calories), low-alcohol (low in alcohol)
  • (having little value or significance): inconsequential, trivial, unimportant
Antonyms
  • (of little weight): heavy, weighty, burdensome
  • (lightly-built): cumbersome, heavyweight, massive
  • (having little force or momentum): forceful, heavy, strong
  • (low in fat, calories, etc): calorific (high in calories), fatty (high in fat), strong (high in alcohol)
  • (having little value or significance): crucial, important, weighty
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Adverb

light (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Carrying little.
Derived terms
  • travel light
Related terms
Translations

Noun

light (plural lights)

  1. (curling) A stone that is not thrown hard enough.
  2. See lights (lungs).

Verb

light (third-person singular simple present lights, present participle lighting, simple past and past participle lighted)

  1. (nautical) To unload a ship, or to jettison material to make it lighter
  2. To lighten; to ease of a burden; to take off.
Derived terms
  • lighter
Translations

Etymology 5

Old English līhtan

Verb

light (third-person singular simple present lights, present participle lighting, simple past and past participle lit or lighted)

  1. To find by chance.
    I lit upon a rare book in a second-hand bookseller’s.
  2. To stop upon (of eyes or a glance); to notice
    • 1903, Jack London, The Call of the Wild
      “Sacredam!” he cried, when his eyes lit upon Buck.
  3. (archaic) To alight; to land or come down.
    She fell out of the window but luckily lit on her feet.
    • 1769, Benjamin Blayney (Ed.), King James Bible (Genesis 25:64)
      And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and when she saw Isaac, she lighted off the camel.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman
      Some kinds of ducks in lighting strike the water with their tails first, and skitter along the surface for a few feet before settling down.
    • 1957, Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel), The Cat in the Hat
      And our fish came down, too. He fell into a pot! He said, “Do I like this? Oh, no! I do not. This is not a good game,” Said our fish as he lit.
Synonyms
  • (find by chance): chance upon, come upon, find, happen upon, hit upon
  • (alight): alight, land
Derived terms
Translations

French

Etymology

From English light

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lajt/

Adjective

light (invariable)

  1. light, slight
  2. (of food) diet, low-fat, fat-free, light

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • lighte, lyght, lyghte, liȝt, liȝte, lyȝt, lyȝte, lijȝt, liȝht, lyȝht, lyȝhte, liȝth, lyȝth, ligt, lygtte, ligth, liht, lihte, lyht, lyhte, lith, lithe, lyth, lythe, litht, lite, lyte, lit, lytte, lichte, lict, licth, liste, leoht, leocht, loht

Etymology

From Old English lēoht (light, daylight; power of vision; luminary; world), from Proto-West Germanic *leuht, from Proto-Germanic *leuhtą (light), from Proto-Indo-European *lewktom, from the root *lewk- (light).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lixt/
  • Rhymes: -ixt

Noun

light (plural lightes)

  1. The radiation which allows for vision by brightening objects and colours.
  2. Illumination in general, or any source thereof.
  3. The metaphorical clarity resulting from philosophical or religious ideals such as truth, wisdom, righteousness, etc.
  4. Mental or spiritual acuity; the presence of life in a living being.
  5. (chemistry) The property of lustre; how shiny a substance is.
  6. (religion) Heavenly radiance; glory
  7. (architecture) an opening in a wall allowing for the transmission of light; a window.
  8. The sense of sight.
  9. The state of being easily seen.

Descendants

  • English: light
  • Scots: licht

References

  • “light, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-05.

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English light. Doublet of leve, léu and ligeiro.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈlajt͡ʃ/

Adjective

light (invariable, comparable)

  1. (of food) light (low in fat, calories, alcohol, salt or other undesirable substances)

Spanish

Etymology

From English light.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlait/, [ˈlai̯t̪]

Adjective

light (invariable)

  1. light (low in fat, calories, salt, alcohol, etc.)
  2. (of cigarettes) light (low in tar, nicotine and other noxious chemicals)
  3. (by extension) Lacking substance or seriousness; lite

Usage notes

  • As a foreign term with unassimilated spelling and pronunciation, light is usually rendered in italics in formal contexts or published writings.

References

  • “light” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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