fall vs pin what difference

what is difference between fall and pin

English

Etymology 1

Verb from Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan (to fall, fail, decay, die, attack), from Proto-West Germanic *fallan (to fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-.

Cognate with West Frisian falle (to fall), Low German fallen (to fall), Dutch vallen (to fall), German fallen (to fall), Norwegian Bokmål falle (to fall), Norwegian Nynorsk falla (to fall), Icelandic falla (to fall), Albanian fal (forgive, pray, salute, greet), Lithuanian pùlti (to attack, rush).

Noun from Middle English fal, fall, falle, from Old English feall, ġefeall (a falling, fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallą, *fallaz (a fall, trap), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-. Cognate with Dutch val, German Fall, Swedish fall, Icelandic fall.

Sense of “autumn” is attested by the 1660s in England as a shortening of Middle English fall of the leaf (1540s), from the falling of leaves during this season. Along with autumn, it mostly replaced the older name harvest as that name began to be associated strictly with the act of harvesting. Compare spring, which began as a shortening of “spring of the leaf”.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔːl/
  • (General American) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔl/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: fäl, IPA(key): /fɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl

Verb

fall (third-person singular simple present falls, present participle falling, simple past fell or (in archaic sense only) felled, past participle fallen or (in archaic sense only) felled)

  1. (heading, intransitive) To be moved downwards.
    1. To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
      • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    2. To come down, to drop or descend.
      • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond, Ch.1:
        Her eyes fell on the table, and she advanced into the room wiping her hands on her apron.
    3. To come as if by dropping down.
      • 1898, William Le Queux, Whoso Findeth a Wife, page 256:
        Once or twice a noise fell upon his quick ear, and we halted, he standing revolver in hand in an attitude of defense. Each time, however, we ascertained that we had no occasion for alarm, the noise being made by some animal or bird  …
      • 1904, Bram Stoker, The Jewel of Seven Stars, page 248:
        And then a sudden calm fell on us like a cloud of fear. There! on the table, lay the Jewel of Seven Stars, shining and sparkling with lurid light, as though each of the seven points of each of the seven stars gleamed through blood!
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N [] dark clouds closing in over everything. At 3 in the afternoon the breeze came up from the S with a thick drizzle. Thus night fell, and thus we passed the rest of it.
      • 1981, Dan Kirby, Schreiber’s Choice, Ace Books (→ISBN)
        The horse wrangler, a tall, bronzed-face man, waved to the wagon driver. The driver laughed. [] The canvas cover rolled up suddenly and a terrible noise fell over the desert.
    4. To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
    5. To be brought to the ground.
  2. (transitive) To move downwards.
    1. (obsolete) To let fall; to drop.
    2. (obsolete) To sink; to depress.
    3. (Britain, US, dialect, archaic) To fell; to cut down.
  3. (intransitive) To change, often negatively.
    1. (copulative, in idiomatic expressions) To become.
      • At length they stood at the corner from which they had begun, and it had fallen quite dark, and they were no wiser.
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N and then it fell calm, []
    2. (intransitive) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
    3. (intransitive, formal, euphemistic) To die, especially in battle or by disease.
    4. (intransitive) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc.).
      • 1612, John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
        The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
      • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Vol.1, pp.284-5:
        Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  4. To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); to happen.
    • 1978, Dwight David Eisenhower, Mamie Doud Eisenhower, Letters to Mamie, Doubleday Books:
      (Thus D-day fell on June 6 rather than the planned June 5.)
  5. (intransitive) To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To diminish; to lessen or lower.
    • Upon lessening interest to four per cent, you fall the price of your native commodities.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forth.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; said of the young of certain animals.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  9. (intransitive) To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
    • Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.
  10. (intransitive) To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.
  11. (intransitive) To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
    • Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
    • I have observed of late thy looks are fallen.
  12. (intransitive) To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
    • Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 2
      [] An the worst fall that ever fell, I hope I shall make shift to go without him.
    • 1879, Herbert Spenser, Principles of Sociology Volume II – Part IV: Ceremonial Institutions
      Primitive men [] do not make laws, they fall into customs.
  13. (intransitive) To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett (Thucydides)
      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul.
  14. (intransitive) To be dropped or uttered carelessly.
  15. (intransitive, of a fabric) To hang down (under the influence of gravity).
Quotations
  • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of King Richard the third, Andrew Wiſe (publisher, 1598 — second quarto), Act V, Scene 3:
    Ghoaſt [of Clarence]. [] / To morrow in the battaile thinke on me, / And fall thy edgeleſſe ſword, diſpaire and die.
Synonyms
  • (move to a lower position under the effect of gravity): drop, plummet, plunge
  • (come down): come down, descend, drop
  • (come to the ground deliberately): drop, lower oneself, prostrate oneself
  • (be brought to the ground):
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): be beaten by, be defeated by, be overthrown by, be smitten by, be vanquished by,
  • (die): die
  • (be allotted to): be the responsibility of, be up to
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): dip, drop
  • (become): become, get
  • (cause (something) to descend to the ground): cut down (of a tree), fell, knock down, knock over, strike down
Antonyms
  • (come down): ascend, go up, rise
  • (come to the ground deliberately): get up, pick oneself up, stand up
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): beat, defeat, overthrow, smite, vanquish
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): rise
Coordinate terms
  • topple
  • tumble
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

fall (countable and uncountable, plural falls)

  1. The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  2. A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
    • “I’m through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  3. (chiefly Canada, US, archaic in Britain) The time of the year when the leaves typically fall from the trees; autumn; the season of the year between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. [from 16th c.]
  4. A loss of greatness or status.
  5. That which falls or cascades.
  6. (sports) A crucial event or circumstance.
    1. (cricket, of a wicket) The action of a batsman being out.
    2. (curling) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
    3. (wrestling) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
  7. A hairpiece for women consisting of long strands of hair on a woven backing, intended primarily to cover hair loss.
  8. (informal, US) Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.
  9. The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting (usu. plural).
  10. An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.
  11. A short, flexible piece of leather forming part of a bullwhip, placed between the thong and the cracker.
  12. The lid, on a piano, that covers the keyboard
Synonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position): descent, drop
  • (reduction): decrease, dip, drop, lowering, reduction
  • (season): autumn, (UK dialect) harvest, (UK dialect) back end
  • (loss of greatness or status): downfall
  • (blame; punishment): rap
Antonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity): ascent, rise
  • (reduction): increase, rise
  • (loss of greatness or status): ascent, rise
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See also

  • falls

Etymology 2

Perhaps from the north-eastern Scottish pronunciation of whale.

Interjection

fall

  1. (nautical) The cry given when a whale is sighted, or harpooned.

Noun

fall (plural falls)

  1. (nautical) The chasing of a hunted whale.
Derived terms
  • loose fall

Albanian

Etymology

From Turkish fal, from Arabic فَأْل(faʾl, omen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɫ/

Noun

fall m (indefinite plural falle, definite singular falli, definite plural fallet)

  1. fortune telling

Declension

Derived terms

References


Breton

Adjective

fall

  1. bad

Catalan

Etymology

From fallir.

Noun

fall m (plural falls)

  1. cliff

Related terms

  • falla

Further reading

  • “fall” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/

Noun

fall n (genitive singular fals, plural føll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. case (linguistics)

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fal/
  • Rhymes: -al

Verb

fall

  1. singular imperative of fallen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of fallen

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/
  • Rhymes: -atl

Noun

fall n (genitive singular falls, nominative plural föll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. (grammar) case
  3. (computing, programming) function; (subprogram, usually with formal parameters, returning a data value when called)
  4. indefinite accusative singular of fall

Declension

Synonyms

  • (function): fallstefja

Derived terms

See also

  • falla (verb)

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla or fallene)

  1. a fall
  2. case
    i fall – in case
    i alle fall – in any case

Derived terms

Related terms

  • falle (verb)

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɑlː/

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla)

  1. a fall
  2. case

Derived terms

Verb

fall

  1. past tense of falle
  2. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

Noun

fall n

  1. a fall (the act of falling)
  2. a fall, loss of greatness or wealth, a bankruptcy
  3. a slope, a waterfall, the height of a slope or waterfall
  4. a (legal) case

Declension

Related terms

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falla.

References

  • fall in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pĭn, IPA(key): /pɪn/, [pʰɪn]
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophone: pen (pin-pen merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English pinne, from Old English pinn (pin, peg, bolt), from Proto-Germanic *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- (protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge).

Cognate with Dutch pin (peg, pin), Low German pin, pinne (pin, point, nail, peg), German Pinn, Pinne (pin, tack, peg), Bavarian Pfonzer, Pfunzer (sharpened point), Danish pind (pin, pointed stick), Norwegian pinn (stick), Swedish pinne (peg, rod, stick), Icelandic pinni (pin). More at pintle.

No relation to classical Latin pinna (fin, flipper, wing-like appendage, wing, feather), which was extended to mean “ridge, peak, point” (compare pinnacle), and often confused with Latin penna (wing, feather). More at feather.

Noun

pin (plural pins)

  1. A needle without an eye (usually) made of drawn-out steel wire with one end sharpened and the other flattened or rounded into a head, used for fastening.
  2. A small nail with a head and a sharp point.
  3. A cylinder often of wood or metal used to fasten or as a bearing between two parts.
  4. (wrestling, professional wrestling) The victory condition of holding the opponent’s shoulders on the wrestling mat for a prescribed period of time.
  5. A slender object specially designed for use in a specific game or sport, such as skittles or bowling.
  6. (informal, in the plural) A leg.
  7. (electricity) Any of the individual connecting elements of a multipole electrical connector.
  8. A piece of jewellery that is attached to clothing with a pin.
  9. (US) A simple accessory that can be attached to clothing with a pin or fastener, often round and bearing a design, logo or message, and used for decoration, identification or to show political affiliation, etc.
    Synonyms: lapel pin, badge
  10. (chess) A scenario in which moving a lesser piece to escape from attack would expose a more valuable piece to attack.
  11. (golf) The flagstick: the flag-bearing pole which marks the location of a hole
  12. (curling) The spot at the exact centre of the house (the target area)
  13. (dated) A mood, a state of being.
    • 1653, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism
      he had made the sign of the Cross on his head; for he was then on a merry pin and full of jearing
  14. One of a row of pegs in the side of an ancient drinking cup to mark how much each person should drink.
  15. (medicine, obsolete) Caligo.
  16. A thing of small value; a trifle.
    • He [] did not care a pin for her.
  17. A peg in musical instruments for increasing or relaxing the tension of the strings.
  18. (engineering) A short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal.
  19. The tenon of a dovetail joint.
  20. (Britain, brewing) A size of brewery cask, equal to half a firkin, or eighth of a barrel.
  21. (informal) A pinball machine.
    • 1949, Billboard (volume 61, page 82)
      Attracted by game operation, many invested heavily in pins and rolldowns prior to last spring.
Synonyms
  • (small nail): nail, tack
  • (cylinder of wood or metal): peg
  • (games): skittle
  • (jewellery fastened with a pin): brooch
Hyponyms
  • (jewellery fastened with a pin): breastpin
  • (chess): absolute pin, relative pin, partial pin
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • needle

Verb

pin (third-person singular simple present pins, present participle pinning, simple past and past participle pinned)

  1. (often followed by a preposition such as “to” or “on”) To fasten or attach (something) with a pin.
  2. (chess, usually passive) To cause (a piece) to be in a pin.
  3. (wrestling) To pin down (someone).
    He pinned his opponent on the mat.
  4. To enclose; to confine; to pen; to pound.
  5. (computing, graphical user interface, transitive) To attach (an icon, application, message etc.) to another item so that it persists.
  6. (computing, transitive) To fix (an array in memory, a security certificate, etc.) so that it cannot be modified.
  7. To cause an analog gauge to reach the stop pin at the high end of the range.
    Synonym: peg
    • 1979, Al Greenwood and Lou Gramm, “Rev on the Red Line” from Head Games:
      Now I need to pin those needles.
Derived terms
  • pin down
  • pin in
  • pin on
  • pin the meter
  • pin the tail on the donkey
  • pin up
  • underpin
Translations

Etymology 2

Verb

pin (third-person singular simple present pins, present participle pinning, simple past and past participle pinned)

  1. Alternative form of peen

Anagrams

  • NIP, NPI, Nip, nip

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpin/

Noun

pin m (plural pins)

  1. (electronics) lead
  2. pin (ornament)

Chuukese

Adjective

pin

  1. holy

Synonyms

  • fen

Cimbrian

Verb

pin

  1. first-person singular present indicative of zèinan: am

Cornish

Noun

pin f (singulative pinen)

  1. pines

Synonyms

  • sab

Danish

Verb

pin

  1. imperative of pine

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *pinnaz *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- ‘protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge’. Cognate with English pin, Low German pin, pinne (pin, point, nail, peg), German Pinn, Pinne (pin, tack, peg), Bavarian Pfonzer, Pfunzer (sharpened point), Danish pind (pin, pointed stick), Norwegian pinn (stick), Swedish pinne (peg, rod, stick), Icelandic pinni (pin).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • IPA(key): /pɪn/

Noun

pin f (plural pinnen, diminutive pinnetje n)

  1. peg, pin

Etymology 2

Abbreviation

Noun

pin

  1. Abbreviation of persoonlijk identificatienummer.

Etymology 3

Verb

pin

  1. first-person singular present indicative of pinnen
  2. imperative of pinnen

Anagrams

  • nip

French

Etymology

From Old French pin, from Latin pīnus, ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *poi- (sap, juice).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛ̃/
  • Homophones: pain, pains, peins, peint, peints, pins

Noun

pin m (plural pins)

  1. pine, pine tree

Derived terms

  • noix de pin
  • pin de Briançon
  • pomme de pin

Further reading

  • “pin” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin pīnus.

Noun

pin m (plural pins)

  1. pine tree

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch pin, from Proto-Germanic *pinnaz *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- ‘protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge’.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɪn]
  • Hyphenation: pin

Noun

pin

  1. pin
    1. (colloquial) a needle without an eye (usually) made of drawn-out steel wire with one end sharpened and the other flattened or rounded into a head, used for fastening.
      Synonym: peniti
    2. a slender object specially designed for use in a specific game or sport, such as skittles or bowling.
  2. (colloquial) peg.
    Synonym: pasak

Further reading

  • “pin” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Japanese

Romanization

pin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ピン

Latvian

Verb

pin

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of pīt
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of pīt
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of pīt
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of pīt
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of pīt
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of pīt

Mandarin

Romanization

pin

  1. Nonstandard spelling of pīn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of pín.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of pǐn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of pìn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mapudungun

Verb

pin (Raguileo spelling)

  1. To say
  2. To tell (a story).
  3. first-person singular realis form of pin

Synonyms

  • (tell a story): nvxamyen

Ojibwe

Noun

pin anim (plural piniig, diminutive piniins, locative piniing, pejorative pinish)

  1. potato

Papantla Totonac

Noun

pin inan

  1. chili. chili pepper.

References

  • Crescencio García Ramos, Diccionario Básico Totonaco-Español Español-Totonaco (Xalapa, Academia Veracruzana de las Lenguas Indígenas, 2007)

Rawang

Etymology

Compare Chinese (bīng).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʰin˧/

Noun

pin

  1. army.
  2. soldier.

Synonyms

  • (army): dap, pindap, sìl
  • (soldier): pinla, sìlsè

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin pīnus, ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *poi- (sap, juice).

Noun

pin m (plural pini)

  1. pine

Declension

See also

  • brad

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) pign
  • (Sursilvan) pégn
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) pegn

Etymology

From Latin pīnus.

Noun

pin m

  1. (Puter, Vallader) spruce, fir

Synonyms

  • (spruce): (Vallader) petsch

Seta

Noun

pin

  1. woman

References

  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66

Spanish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English pin

Noun

pin m (plural pines)

  1. pin, lapel pin, badge
    Synonym: insignia
  2. (electricity) pin (any of the individual connecting elements of a multipole electrical connector)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English PIN, acronym of personal identification number

Alternative forms

  • PIN

Noun

pin m (plural pines)

  1. PIN, PIN number
    Synonym: número pin

Swedish

Etymology 1

Clipping of pinsam, with the same meaning.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpiːn/

Adjective

pin (comparative mer pin, superlative mest pin)

  1. (colloquial) embarrasing
Declension

Invariable, not used in the definite form.

Etymology 2

From pina.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpiːn/

Noun

pin

  1. pain, torment
Derived terms
  • om man vill vara fin, får man lida pin; vill man vara fin, får man lida pin

Adverb

pin (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) very, really, super-
    Synonyms: jätte-, väldigt
Derived terms
  • på pin kiv

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English pin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɪn/

Noun

pin n

  1. Alternative form of pins
Usage notes

The form with -s is recommended since it’s easier to decline in Swedish.

References

  • pin in Nationalencyklopedin (needs an authorization fee).


Turkish

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish پین(pin), borrowed from a dialectal form of Armenian բույն (buyn, nest).

Noun

pin (definite accusative pini, plural pinler)

  1. (dialectal) coop for poultry

Declension

Synonyms

  • kümes

References

  • Ačaṙean, Hračʿeay (1971–1979), “բոյն”, in Hayerēn armatakan baṙaran [Dictionary of Armenian Root Words] (in Armenian), 2nd edition, reprint of the original 1926–1935 seven-volume edition, Yerevan: University Press
  • pin”, in Türkiye’de halk ağzından derleme sözlüğü [Compilation Dictionary of Popular Speech in Turkey] (in Turkish), Ankara: Türk Dil Kurumu, 1963–1982

Vietnamese

Etymology

Borrowed from French pile.

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [pin˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [pin˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [pɨn˧˧]

Noun

(classifier cục) pin

  1. a battery
  2. the amount of electricity that a battery holds

Derived terms

  • đèn pin (torch, flashlight)

Welsh

Etymology 1

From Latin pīnus (compare Middle Irish pín).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /piːn/

Noun

pin m or m pl (uncountable)

  1. pine (tree)
  2. pine (wood)
Usage notes

Modern Welsh orthography prefers the form pin to the superseded form pîn.

Synonyms
  • pinwydd f pl

Derived terms

  • pin-afal

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪn/

Noun

pin m (plural pinnau)

  1. Superseded spelling of pìn.
Usage notes

Modern Welsh orthography uses pìn instead of the superseded form pin.

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “pin”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Yapese

Etymology

From Proto-Oceanic *papine, from Proto-Austronesian *bahi (woman).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪn/

Noun

pin

  1. woman

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