fall vs settle what difference

what is difference between fall and settle

English

Etymology 1

Verb from Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan (to fall, fail, decay, die, attack), from Proto-West Germanic *fallan (to fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-.

Cognate with West Frisian falle (to fall), Low German fallen (to fall), Dutch vallen (to fall), German fallen (to fall), Norwegian Bokmål falle (to fall), Norwegian Nynorsk falla (to fall), Icelandic falla (to fall), Albanian fal (forgive, pray, salute, greet), Lithuanian pùlti (to attack, rush).

Noun from Middle English fal, fall, falle, from Old English feall, ġefeall (a falling, fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallą, *fallaz (a fall, trap), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-. Cognate with Dutch val, German Fall, Swedish fall, Icelandic fall.

Sense of “autumn” is attested by the 1660s in England as a shortening of Middle English fall of the leaf (1540s), from the falling of leaves during this season. Along with autumn, it mostly replaced the older name harvest as that name began to be associated strictly with the act of harvesting. Compare spring, which began as a shortening of “spring of the leaf”.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔːl/
  • (General American) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔl/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: fäl, IPA(key): /fɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl

Verb

fall (third-person singular simple present falls, present participle falling, simple past fell or (in archaic sense only) felled, past participle fallen or (in archaic sense only) felled)

  1. (heading, intransitive) To be moved downwards.
    1. To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
      • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    2. To come down, to drop or descend.
      • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond, Ch.1:
        Her eyes fell on the table, and she advanced into the room wiping her hands on her apron.
    3. To come as if by dropping down.
      • 1898, William Le Queux, Whoso Findeth a Wife, page 256:
        Once or twice a noise fell upon his quick ear, and we halted, he standing revolver in hand in an attitude of defense. Each time, however, we ascertained that we had no occasion for alarm, the noise being made by some animal or bird  …
      • 1904, Bram Stoker, The Jewel of Seven Stars, page 248:
        And then a sudden calm fell on us like a cloud of fear. There! on the table, lay the Jewel of Seven Stars, shining and sparkling with lurid light, as though each of the seven points of each of the seven stars gleamed through blood!
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N [] dark clouds closing in over everything. At 3 in the afternoon the breeze came up from the S with a thick drizzle. Thus night fell, and thus we passed the rest of it.
      • 1981, Dan Kirby, Schreiber’s Choice, Ace Books (→ISBN)
        The horse wrangler, a tall, bronzed-face man, waved to the wagon driver. The driver laughed. [] The canvas cover rolled up suddenly and a terrible noise fell over the desert.
    4. To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
    5. To be brought to the ground.
  2. (transitive) To move downwards.
    1. (obsolete) To let fall; to drop.
    2. (obsolete) To sink; to depress.
    3. (Britain, US, dialect, archaic) To fell; to cut down.
  3. (intransitive) To change, often negatively.
    1. (copulative, in idiomatic expressions) To become.
      • At length they stood at the corner from which they had begun, and it had fallen quite dark, and they were no wiser.
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N and then it fell calm, []
    2. (intransitive) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
    3. (intransitive, formal, euphemistic) To die, especially in battle or by disease.
    4. (intransitive) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc.).
      • 1612, John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
        The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
      • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Vol.1, pp.284-5:
        Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  4. To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); to happen.
    • 1978, Dwight David Eisenhower, Mamie Doud Eisenhower, Letters to Mamie, Doubleday Books:
      (Thus D-day fell on June 6 rather than the planned June 5.)
  5. (intransitive) To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To diminish; to lessen or lower.
    • Upon lessening interest to four per cent, you fall the price of your native commodities.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forth.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; said of the young of certain animals.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  9. (intransitive) To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
    • Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.
  10. (intransitive) To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.
  11. (intransitive) To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
    • Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
    • I have observed of late thy looks are fallen.
  12. (intransitive) To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
    • Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 2
      [] An the worst fall that ever fell, I hope I shall make shift to go without him.
    • 1879, Herbert Spenser, Principles of Sociology Volume II – Part IV: Ceremonial Institutions
      Primitive men [] do not make laws, they fall into customs.
  13. (intransitive) To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett (Thucydides)
      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul.
  14. (intransitive) To be dropped or uttered carelessly.
  15. (intransitive, of a fabric) To hang down (under the influence of gravity).
Quotations
  • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of King Richard the third, Andrew Wiſe (publisher, 1598 — second quarto), Act V, Scene 3:
    Ghoaſt [of Clarence]. [] / To morrow in the battaile thinke on me, / And fall thy edgeleſſe ſword, diſpaire and die.
Synonyms
  • (move to a lower position under the effect of gravity): drop, plummet, plunge
  • (come down): come down, descend, drop
  • (come to the ground deliberately): drop, lower oneself, prostrate oneself
  • (be brought to the ground):
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): be beaten by, be defeated by, be overthrown by, be smitten by, be vanquished by,
  • (die): die
  • (be allotted to): be the responsibility of, be up to
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): dip, drop
  • (become): become, get
  • (cause (something) to descend to the ground): cut down (of a tree), fell, knock down, knock over, strike down
Antonyms
  • (come down): ascend, go up, rise
  • (come to the ground deliberately): get up, pick oneself up, stand up
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): beat, defeat, overthrow, smite, vanquish
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): rise
Coordinate terms
  • topple
  • tumble
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

fall (countable and uncountable, plural falls)

  1. The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  2. A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
    • “I’m through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  3. (chiefly Canada, US, archaic in Britain) The time of the year when the leaves typically fall from the trees; autumn; the season of the year between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. [from 16th c.]
  4. A loss of greatness or status.
  5. That which falls or cascades.
  6. (sports) A crucial event or circumstance.
    1. (cricket, of a wicket) The action of a batsman being out.
    2. (curling) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
    3. (wrestling) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
  7. A hairpiece for women consisting of long strands of hair on a woven backing, intended primarily to cover hair loss.
  8. (informal, US) Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.
  9. The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting (usu. plural).
  10. An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.
  11. A short, flexible piece of leather forming part of a bullwhip, placed between the thong and the cracker.
  12. The lid, on a piano, that covers the keyboard
Synonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position): descent, drop
  • (reduction): decrease, dip, drop, lowering, reduction
  • (season): autumn, (UK dialect) harvest, (UK dialect) back end
  • (loss of greatness or status): downfall
  • (blame; punishment): rap
Antonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity): ascent, rise
  • (reduction): increase, rise
  • (loss of greatness or status): ascent, rise
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See also

  • falls

Etymology 2

Perhaps from the north-eastern Scottish pronunciation of whale.

Interjection

fall

  1. (nautical) The cry given when a whale is sighted, or harpooned.

Noun

fall (plural falls)

  1. (nautical) The chasing of a hunted whale.
Derived terms
  • loose fall

Albanian

Etymology

From Turkish fal, from Arabic فَأْل(faʾl, omen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɫ/

Noun

fall m (indefinite plural falle, definite singular falli, definite plural fallet)

  1. fortune telling

Declension

Derived terms

References


Breton

Adjective

fall

  1. bad

Catalan

Etymology

From fallir.

Noun

fall m (plural falls)

  1. cliff

Related terms

  • falla

Further reading

  • “fall” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/

Noun

fall n (genitive singular fals, plural føll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. case (linguistics)

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fal/
  • Rhymes: -al

Verb

fall

  1. singular imperative of fallen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of fallen

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/
  • Rhymes: -atl

Noun

fall n (genitive singular falls, nominative plural föll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. (grammar) case
  3. (computing, programming) function; (subprogram, usually with formal parameters, returning a data value when called)
  4. indefinite accusative singular of fall

Declension

Synonyms

  • (function): fallstefja

Derived terms

See also

  • falla (verb)

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla or fallene)

  1. a fall
  2. case
    i fall – in case
    i alle fall – in any case

Derived terms

Related terms

  • falle (verb)

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɑlː/

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla)

  1. a fall
  2. case

Derived terms

Verb

fall

  1. past tense of falle
  2. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

Noun

fall n

  1. a fall (the act of falling)
  2. a fall, loss of greatness or wealth, a bankruptcy
  3. a slope, a waterfall, the height of a slope or waterfall
  4. a (legal) case

Declension

Related terms

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falla.

References

  • fall in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈsɛtl̩/
  • (General American) enPR: sĕtʹəl, IPA(key): /ˈsɛtəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛtəl
  • Hyphenation: set‧tle

Etymology 1

From a merger of two verbs:

  • Middle English setlen, from Old English setlan (to settle, seat, put to rest), from Old English setl (seat) (compare Dutch zetelen (to be established, settle)) and
  • Middle English sahtlen, seihtlen (to reconcile, calm, subside), from Old English sahtlian, ġesehtlian (to reconcile), from Old English saht, seht (settlement, agreement, reconciliation, peace) (see saught, -le).

German siedeln (to settle) is related to the former of the two verbs, but is not an immediate cognate of either of them.

Verb

settle (third-person singular simple present settles, present participle settling, simple past and past participle settled)

  1. To conclude or resolve (something):
    1. (transitive) To determine (something which was exposed to doubt or question); to resolve conclusively; to set or fix (a time, an order of succession, etc).
    2. (transitive) To conclude, to cause (a dispute) to finish.
      1. (transitive) In particular, to terminate (a lawsuit), usually out of court, by agreement of all parties.
    3. (transitive) To close, liquidate or balance (an account) by payment, sometimes of less than is owed or due.
      • 2012, Paul Kelly, Willie Blair: A Tale of True Loss and Sadness →ISBN:
        The coffee was only surface wet and looked worse than it actually was and as he returned to the Reception Desk to settle his account and give back his room key, he was met again by the young man who was still wearing his rucksack.
    4. (transitive, colloquial) To pay (a bill).
    5. (intransitive) To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement on matters in dispute.
    6. (intransitive) To conclude a lawsuit by agreement of the parties rather than a decision of a court.
  2. (transitive) To place or arrange in(to) a desired (especially: calm) state, or make final disposition of (something).
    1. (transitive) To put into (proper) place; to make sit or lie properly.
      • 2012, Nancy Gideon, Seeker of Shadows →ISBN:
        She twisted out from under the claim of his palm to settle her feet on the floor.
      • 2002, Tom Deitz, Warautumn →ISBN, page 53:
        Pausing only to settle his cloak and set his Regent’s circlet on his hair, he strode to the rail and waited.
    2. (transitive) To cause to no longer be in a disturbed, confused or stormy; to quiet; to calm (nerves, waters, a boisterous or rebellious child, etc).
    3. (Britain, dialectal) To silence, especially by force.
    4. to kill.
      • 1894-5, Patterson, Man and Nature (in The Primitive Methodist Magazine):
        I poured a charge of powder over the nipple so as not tu miss goin’ off if possible. Click! went the match,—up jumped the flock, or tried tu. As they bunched up, Peggy blazed intu ’em, settlin’ how many I didn’t know, […]
    5. (transitive) To bring or restore (ground, roads, etc) to a smooth, dry, or passable condition.
  3. (intransitive) To become calm, quiet, or orderly; to stop being agitated.
    1. (intransitive) To become firm, dry, and hard, like the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared.
  4. To establish or become established in a steady position:
    1. (transitive) To place in(to) a fixed or permanent condition or position or on(to) a permanent basis; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish or fix.
    2. (transitive) In particular, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home, etc.
      1. (transitive, US, obsolete) In particular, to establish in pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish.
    3. (transitive, law) To formally, legally secure (an annuity, property, title, etc) on (a person).
    4. (intransitive) To become married, or a householder.
    5. (intransitive, with “in”) To be established in a profession or in employment.
    6. (intransitive, usually with “down”, “in”, “on” or another preposition) To become stationary or fixed; to come to rest.
      • 1735, John Arbuthnot, An essay concerning the nature of aliments
        Chyle […] runs through all the intermediate colors until it settles in an intense red.
  5. (intransitive) To fix one’s residence in a place; to establish a dwelling place, home, or colony. (Compare settle down.)
    1. (transitive, in particular) To colonize (an area); to migrate to (a land, territory, site, etc).
  6. (transitive) To move (people) to (a land or territory), so as to colonize it; to cause (people) to take residence in (a place).
  7. To sink, or cause (something, or impurities within it) to sink down, especially so as to become clear or compact.
    1. (transitive) To clear or purify (a liquid) of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink.
    2. (transitive) To cause to sink down or to be deposited (dregs, sediment, etc).
    3. (transitive) To render compact or solid; to cause to become packed down.
    4. (intransitive) To sink to the bottom of a body of liquid, as dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reservoir.
    5. (intransitive) To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, for example the foundation of a house, etc.
    6. (intransitive) To become compact due to sinking.
    7. (intransitive) To become clear due to the sinking of sediment. (Used especially of liquid. also used figuratively.)
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To make a jointure for a spouse.
    • 1712, Samuel Garth, Epilogue to Cato, a Tragedy, by Joseph Addison:
      He sighs with most success that settles well.
  9. (transitive, intransitive) Of an animal: to make or become pregnant.
Alternative forms
  • sattle (in several British dialects)
Synonyms
  • adjust
  • arrange
  • compose
  • decide
  • determine
  • establish
  • fix
  • regulate
Antonyms
  • (to place in a fixed or permanent condition): remove
  • disturb
  • agitate
  • wander
Derived terms
Related terms
  • settlement
  • settler
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English settle, setle, setel, setil, seotel, from Old English setl (that upon which one sits, a seat, a settle, a place to sit), from Proto-Germanic *setlaz (a seat; arm-chair), representing Proto-Indo-European *sed-lo-, from *sed- (sit). Cognate with Dutch zetel, German Sessel, Latin sella.

Noun

settle (plural settles)

  1. (archaic) A seat of any kind.
    • c. 1348, Richard Rolle, The Form of Living
      sit on a settle of joy with angels
    • 1608, Joshua Sylvester, “The Law”, in Du Bartas his divine weekes and workes
      If hunger drive the Pagans from their dens,
      One, ‘gainst a settle breaketh both his shins;
    • 1878–1880, John Richard Green, A History of the English People:
      [The] Queen or eorl’s wife, with a train of maidens, bore ale-bowl or mead-bowl round the hall, from the high settle of king or ealdorman in the midst to the mead benches ranged around its walls, while the gleeman sang the hero-songs
  2. (now rare) A long bench with a high back and arms, often with chest or storage space underneath.
    • 1880, Ellen Murray Beam, English translation of Captain Fracasse by Théophile Gautier (→ISBN):
      Let us return now to the little girl we left feigning to sleep soundly upon a settle in the kitchen.
    • 1886, John Williamson Palmer, After His Kind:
      By the fireside, the big arm-chair […] fondly cronied with two venerable settles within the chimney corner.
  3. (obsolete) A place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part. (Compare a depression.)

Further reading

  • settle in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • settle in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • settle at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • ettles, tetels

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