fall vs strike what difference

what is difference between fall and strike

English

Etymology 1

Verb from Middle English fallen, from Old English feallan (to fall, fail, decay, die, attack), from Proto-West Germanic *fallan (to fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallaną (to fall), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-.

Cognate with West Frisian falle (to fall), Low German fallen (to fall), Dutch vallen (to fall), German fallen (to fall), Norwegian Bokmål falle (to fall), Norwegian Nynorsk falla (to fall), Icelandic falla (to fall), Albanian fal (forgive, pray, salute, greet), Lithuanian pùlti (to attack, rush).

Noun from Middle English fal, fall, falle, from Old English feall, ġefeall (a falling, fall), from Proto-Germanic *fallą, *fallaz (a fall, trap), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pōl-. Cognate with Dutch val, German Fall, Swedish fall, Icelandic fall.

Sense of “autumn” is attested by the 1660s in England as a shortening of Middle English fall of the leaf (1540s), from the falling of leaves during this season. Along with autumn, it mostly replaced the older name harvest as that name began to be associated strictly with the act of harvesting. Compare spring, which began as a shortening of “spring of the leaf”.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔːl/
  • (General American) enPR: fôl, IPA(key): /fɔl/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: fäl, IPA(key): /fɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl

Verb

fall (third-person singular simple present falls, present participle falling, simple past fell or (in archaic sense only) felled, past participle fallen or (in archaic sense only) felled)

  1. (heading, intransitive) To be moved downwards.
    1. To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
      • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    2. To come down, to drop or descend.
      • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond, Ch.1:
        Her eyes fell on the table, and she advanced into the room wiping her hands on her apron.
    3. To come as if by dropping down.
      • 1898, William Le Queux, Whoso Findeth a Wife, page 256:
        Once or twice a noise fell upon his quick ear, and we halted, he standing revolver in hand in an attitude of defense. Each time, however, we ascertained that we had no occasion for alarm, the noise being made by some animal or bird  …
      • 1904, Bram Stoker, The Jewel of Seven Stars, page 248:
        And then a sudden calm fell on us like a cloud of fear. There! on the table, lay the Jewel of Seven Stars, shining and sparkling with lurid light, as though each of the seven points of each of the seven stars gleamed through blood!
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N [] dark clouds closing in over everything. At 3 in the afternoon the breeze came up from the S with a thick drizzle. Thus night fell, and thus we passed the rest of it.
      • 1981, Dan Kirby, Schreiber’s Choice, Ace Books (→ISBN)
        The horse wrangler, a tall, bronzed-face man, waved to the wagon driver. The driver laughed. [] The canvas cover rolled up suddenly and a terrible noise fell over the desert.
    4. To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
    5. To be brought to the ground.
  2. (transitive) To move downwards.
    1. (obsolete) To let fall; to drop.
    2. (obsolete) To sink; to depress.
    3. (Britain, US, dialect, archaic) To fell; to cut down.
  3. (intransitive) To change, often negatively.
    1. (copulative, in idiomatic expressions) To become.
      • At length they stood at the corner from which they had begun, and it had fallen quite dark, and they were no wiser.
      • 1971, Henry Raup Wagner, Spanish Explorations in the Strait of Juan de Fuca:
        Shortly afterwards a breeze came up from the N and then it fell calm, []
    2. (intransitive) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
    3. (intransitive, formal, euphemistic) To die, especially in battle or by disease.
    4. (intransitive) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc.).
      • 1612, John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
        The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
      • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Vol.1, pp.284-5:
        Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  4. To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); to happen.
    • 1978, Dwight David Eisenhower, Mamie Doud Eisenhower, Letters to Mamie, Doubleday Books:
      (Thus D-day fell on June 6 rather than the planned June 5.)
  5. (intransitive) To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To diminish; to lessen or lower.
    • Upon lessening interest to four per cent, you fall the price of your native commodities.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To bring forth.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; said of the young of certain animals.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  9. (intransitive) To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
    • Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.
  10. (intransitive) To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.
  11. (intransitive) To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
    • Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
    • I have observed of late thy looks are fallen.
  12. (intransitive) To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
    • Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I Scene 2
      [] An the worst fall that ever fell, I hope I shall make shift to go without him.
    • 1879, Herbert Spenser, Principles of Sociology Volume II – Part IV: Ceremonial Institutions
      Primitive men [] do not make laws, they fall into customs.
  13. (intransitive) To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.
    • 1881, Benjamin Jowett (Thucydides)
      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul.
  14. (intransitive) To be dropped or uttered carelessly.
  15. (intransitive, of a fabric) To hang down (under the influence of gravity).
Quotations
  • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of King Richard the third, Andrew Wiſe (publisher, 1598 — second quarto), Act V, Scene 3:
    Ghoaſt [of Clarence]. [] / To morrow in the battaile thinke on me, / And fall thy edgeleſſe ſword, diſpaire and die.
Synonyms
  • (move to a lower position under the effect of gravity): drop, plummet, plunge
  • (come down): come down, descend, drop
  • (come to the ground deliberately): drop, lower oneself, prostrate oneself
  • (be brought to the ground):
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): be beaten by, be defeated by, be overthrown by, be smitten by, be vanquished by,
  • (die): die
  • (be allotted to): be the responsibility of, be up to
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): dip, drop
  • (become): become, get
  • (cause (something) to descend to the ground): cut down (of a tree), fell, knock down, knock over, strike down
Antonyms
  • (come down): ascend, go up, rise
  • (come to the ground deliberately): get up, pick oneself up, stand up
  • (collapse; be overthrown or defeated): beat, defeat, overthrow, smite, vanquish
  • (become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc)): rise
Coordinate terms
  • topple
  • tumble
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

fall (countable and uncountable, plural falls)

  1. The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  2. A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
    • “I’m through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  3. (chiefly Canada, US, archaic in Britain) The time of the year when the leaves typically fall from the trees; autumn; the season of the year between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. [from 16th c.]
  4. A loss of greatness or status.
  5. That which falls or cascades.
  6. (sports) A crucial event or circumstance.
    1. (cricket, of a wicket) The action of a batsman being out.
    2. (curling) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
    3. (wrestling) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
  7. A hairpiece for women consisting of long strands of hair on a woven backing, intended primarily to cover hair loss.
  8. (informal, US) Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.
  9. The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting (usu. plural).
  10. An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.
  11. A short, flexible piece of leather forming part of a bullwhip, placed between the thong and the cracker.
  12. The lid, on a piano, that covers the keyboard
Synonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position): descent, drop
  • (reduction): decrease, dip, drop, lowering, reduction
  • (season): autumn, (UK dialect) harvest, (UK dialect) back end
  • (loss of greatness or status): downfall
  • (blame; punishment): rap
Antonyms
  • (act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity): ascent, rise
  • (reduction): increase, rise
  • (loss of greatness or status): ascent, rise
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See also

  • falls

Etymology 2

Perhaps from the north-eastern Scottish pronunciation of whale.

Interjection

fall

  1. (nautical) The cry given when a whale is sighted, or harpooned.

Noun

fall (plural falls)

  1. (nautical) The chasing of a hunted whale.
Derived terms
  • loose fall

Albanian

Etymology

From Turkish fal, from Arabic فَأْل(faʾl, omen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faɫ/

Noun

fall m (indefinite plural falle, definite singular falli, definite plural fallet)

  1. fortune telling

Declension

Derived terms

References


Breton

Adjective

fall

  1. bad

Catalan

Etymology

From fallir.

Noun

fall m (plural falls)

  1. cliff

Related terms

  • falla

Further reading

  • “fall” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/

Noun

fall n (genitive singular fals, plural føll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. case (linguistics)

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fal/
  • Rhymes: -al

Verb

fall

  1. singular imperative of fallen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of fallen

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fatl/
  • Rhymes: -atl

Noun

fall n (genitive singular falls, nominative plural föll)

  1. fall, drop
  2. (grammar) case
  3. (computing, programming) function; (subprogram, usually with formal parameters, returning a data value when called)
  4. indefinite accusative singular of fall

Declension

Synonyms

  • (function): fallstefja

Derived terms

See also

  • falla (verb)

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla or fallene)

  1. a fall
  2. case
    i fall – in case
    i alle fall – in any case

Derived terms

Related terms

  • falle (verb)

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɑlː/

Noun

fall n (definite singular fallet, indefinite plural fall, definite plural falla)

  1. a fall
  2. case

Derived terms

Verb

fall

  1. past tense of falle
  2. imperative of falle

References

  • “fall” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fall, from falla (to fall). The grammatical sense is a calque of Latin casus.

Pronunciation

Noun

fall n

  1. a fall (the act of falling)
  2. a fall, loss of greatness or wealth, a bankruptcy
  3. a slope, a waterfall, the height of a slope or waterfall
  4. a (legal) case

Declension

Related terms

Verb

fall

  1. imperative of falla.

References

  • fall in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)


English

Etymology

From Middle English stryken, from Old English strīcan, from Proto-Germanic *strīkaną, from Proto-Indo-European *streyg- (to stroke, rub, press). Cognate with Dutch strijken, German streichen, Danish stryge, Icelandic strýkja, strýkva.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /stɹaɪk/
  • Rhymes: -aɪk

Verb

strike (third-person singular simple present strikes, present participle striking, simple past struck or (obsolete) strook, past participle struck or (see usage notes) stricken or (archaic) strucken)

  1. (transitive, sometimes with out or through) To delete or cross out; to scratch or eliminate.
  2. (physical) To have a sharp or sudden effect.
    1. (transitive) To hit.
    2. (transitive) To give, as a blow; to impel, as with a blow; to give a force to; to dash; to cast.
    3. (intransitive) To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows.
    4. (transitive) To manufacture, as by stamping.
    5. (intransitive, dated) To run upon a rock or bank; to be stranded; to run aground.
    6. (transitive) To cause to sound by one or more beats; to indicate or notify by audible strokes. Of a clock, to announce (an hour of the day), usually by one or more sounds.
    7. (intransitive) To sound by percussion, with blows, or as if with blows.
    8. (transitive) To cause or produce by a stroke, or suddenly, as by a stroke.
    9. (transitive) To cause to ignite by friction.
  3. (transitive) To thrust in; to cause to enter or penetrate.
  4. (personal, social) To have a sharp or severe effect.
    1. (transitive) To punish; to afflict; to smite.
    2. (intransitive) To carry out a violent or illegal action.
    3. (intransitive) To act suddenly, especially in a violent or criminal way.
    4. (transitive, figuratively) To impinge upon.
    5. (intransitive) To stop working as a protest to achieve better working conditions.
      Synonym: strike work
      • 1889, New York (State). Dept. of Labor. Bureau of Statistics, Annual Report (part 2, page 127)
        Two men were put to work who could not set their looms; a third man was taken on who helped the inefficients to set the looms. The other weavers thought this was a breach of their union rules and 18 of them struck []
    6. (transitive) To impress, seem or appear (to).
    7. (transitive) To create an impression.
    8. (sports) To score a goal.
    9. To make a sudden impression upon, as if by a blow; to affect with some strong emotion.
    10. To affect by a sudden impression or impulse.
    11. (intransitive, Britain, obsolete, slang) To steal or rob; to take forcibly or fraudulently.
    12. (slang, archaic) To borrow money from; to make a demand upon.
  5. To touch; to act by appulse.
  6. (transitive) To take down, especially in the following contexts.
    1. (nautical) To haul down or lower (a flag, mast, etc.)
    2. (by extension) To capitulate; to signal a surrender by hauling down the colours.
    3. To dismantle and take away (a theater set; a tent; etc.).
      • 1979, Texas Monthly (volume 7, number 8, page 109)
        The crew struck the set with a ferocity hitherto unseen, an army more valiant in retreat than advance.
    4. To unfasten, to loosen (chains, bonds, etc.).
  7. (intransitive) To set off on a walk or trip.
  8. (intransitive) To pass with a quick or strong effect; to dart; to penetrate.
  9. (dated) To break forth; to commence suddenly; with into.
  10. (intransitive) To become attached to something; said of the spat of oysters.
  11. To make and ratify.
  12. To level (a measure of grain, salt, etc.) with a straight instrument, scraping off what is above the level of the top.
  13. (masonry) To cut off (a mortar joint, etc.) even with the face of the wall, or inward at a slight angle.
  14. To hit upon, or light upon, suddenly.
  15. (sugar-making, obsolete) To lade thickened sugar cane juice from a teache into a cooler.
  16. To stroke or pass lightly; to wave.
  17. (obsolete) To advance; to cause to go forward; used only in the past participle.
  18. To balance (a ledger or account).

Usage notes

  • The past participle of strike is usually struck (e.g. He’d struck it rich, or When the clock had struck twelve, etc.); stricken is significantly rarer. However, it is still found in transitive constructions where the subject is the object of an implied action, especially in the phrases “stricken with/by (an affliction)” or “stricken (something) from the record” (e.g. The Court has stricken the statement from the record, or The city was stricken with disease, etc.). Except for in these contexts, stricken is almost never found in informal or colloquial speech.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

strike (plural strikes)

  1. (baseball) A status resulting from a batter swinging and missing a pitch, or not swinging at a pitch when the ball goes in the strike zone, or hitting a foul ball that is not caught.
    • 1996, Lyle Lovett, “Her First Mistake” on The Road to Ensenada:
      It was then I knew I had made my third mistake. Yes, three strikes right across the plate, and as I hollered “Honey, please wait” she was gone.
  2. (bowling) The act of knocking down all ten pins in on the first roll of a frame.
  3. A work stoppage (or otherwise concerted stoppage of an activity) as a form of protest.
    Synonym: walkout
    Antonyms: industrial peace, lockout
  4. A blow or application of physical force against something.
    • 1996, Annie Proulx, Accordion Crimes
      [] and they could hear the rough sound, could hear too the first strikes of rain as though called down by the music.
    • 2008, Lich King, “Attack of the Wrath of the War of the Death of the Strike of the Sword of the Blood of the Beast”, Toxic Zombie Onslaught
  5. (finance) In an option contract, the price at which the holder buys or sells if they choose to exercise the option.
  6. (historical) An old English measure of corn equal to the bushel.
  7. (cricket) The status of being the batsman that the bowler is bowling at.
  8. The primary face of a hammer, opposite the peen.
  9. (geology) The compass direction of the line of intersection between a rock layer and the surface of the Earth.
  10. An instrument with a straight edge for levelling a measure of grain, salt, etc., scraping off what is above the level of the top; a strickle.
  11. (obsolete) Fullness of measure; hence, excellence of quality.
  12. An iron pale or standard in a gate or fence.
  13. (ironworking) A puddler’s stirrer.
  14. (obsolete) The extortion of money, or the attempt to extort money, by threat of injury; blackmail.
  15. The discovery of a source of something.
  16. The strike plate of a door.
  17. (fishing) A nibble on the bait by a fish.
    • 2014, Michael Gorman, Effective Stillwater Fly Fishing (page 87)
      I must admit that my focus was divided, which limited my fishing success. I made a few casts, then arranged my inanimate subjects and took photos. When my indicator went down on my first strike, I cleanly missed the hook up.

Derived terms

Translations

Descendants

  • German: streiken

References

Further reading

  • strike in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • Farmer, John Stephen (1904) Slang and Its Analogues[2], volume 7, page 12

Anagrams

  • Kister, kiters, trikes

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stʁajk/

Noun

strike m (plural strikes)

  1. (bowling) a strike

Derived terms

  • striker

Related terms

  • spare

Italian

Noun

strike m (invariable)

  1. strike (in baseball and ten-pin bowling)

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English strike.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈstɾajk/, /is.ˈtɾaj.ki/

Noun

strike m (plural strikes)

  1. (bowling) strike (the act of knocking down all pins)
  2. (baseball) strike (the act of missing a swing at the ball)

Spanish

Etymology

From English strike.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɾaik/, [ˈst̪ɾai̯k]
  • IPA(key): /esˈtɾaik/, [esˈt̪ɾai̯k]

Noun

strike m (plural strikes)

  1. (baseball) strike
  2. (bowling) strike

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