false vs imitation what difference

what is difference between false and imitation

English

Etymology

From Middle English false, fals, from Old English fals (false; counterfeit; fraudulent; wrong; mistaken), from Latin falsus (counterfeit, false; falsehood), perfect passive participle of fallō (deceive). Reinforced in Middle English by Anglo-Norman and Old French fals, faus. Compare Scots fals, false, Saterland Frisian falsk, German falsch, Dutch vals, Swedish and Danish falsk; all from Latin falsus. Displaced native Middle English les, lese, from Old English lēas (false); See lease, leasing. Doublet of faux.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General New Zealand, General Australian) IPA(key): /fɔːls/, /fɒls/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔls/, /fɑls/

Adjective

false (comparative falser, superlative falsest)

  1. Untrue, not factual, factually incorrect.
  2. Based on factually incorrect premises.
  3. Spurious, artificial.
  4. (logic) Of a state in Boolean logic that indicates a negative result.
  5. Uttering falsehood; dishonest or deceitful.
  6. Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous.
  7. Not well founded; not firm or trustworthy; erroneous.
  8. Not essential or permanent, as parts of a structure which are temporary or supplemental.
  9. Used in the vernacular name of a species (or group of species) together with the name of another species to which it is similar in appearance.
  10. (music) Out of tune.

Synonyms

  • lease
  • See also Thesaurus:false

Antonyms

  • (untrue): real, true

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

false (third-person singular simple present falses, present participle falsing, simple past and past participle falsed)

  1. (electronics, telecommunications, of a decoder) To incorrectly decode noise as if it were a valid signal.

Adverb

false (comparative more false, superlative most false)

  1. In a dishonest and disloyal way; falsely.

Noun

false (plural falses)

  1. One of two options on a true-or-false test.

Anagrams

  • A.S.L.E.F., Leafs, alefs, fasel, feals, fleas, leafs, lefsa

Italian

Adjective

false f pl

  1. feminine plural of falso

Latin

Noun

false

  1. vocative singular of falsus

References

  • false in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • false in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • false in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Spanish

Verb

false

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of falsar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of falsar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of falsar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of falsar.


English

Etymology

From Old French imitacion, from Latin imitatio

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪmɪˈteɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

imitation (countable and uncountable, plural imitations)

  1. The act of imitating.
  2. (attributive) A copy or simulation; something that is not the real thing.
    imitation leather

Antonyms

  • (act of imitating): creation

Translations


French

Etymology

From Latin imitātiō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /i.mi.ta.sjɔ̃/

Noun

imitation f (plural imitations)

  1. imitation

Related terms

  • imiter

Further reading

  • “imitation” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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