familiar vs fellow what difference

what is difference between familiar and fellow

English

Etymology

From Latin familiāris (pertaining to servants; pertaining to the household). Doublet of familial. Displaced native Old English hīwcūþ.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fəˈmɪl.i.ə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fəˈmɪl.jɚ/, /fəˈmɪl.i.ɚ/, /fɚˈmɪl.jɚ/

Adjective

familiar (comparative more familiar, superlative most familiar)

  1. Known to one, or generally known; commonplace.
  2. Acquainted.
  3. Intimate or friendly.
  4. Inappropriately intimate or friendly.
  5. Of or pertaining to a family; familial.
    • 1822, Lord Byron, Werner
      familiar feuds

Synonyms

  • (acquainted): acquainted
  • (intimate, friendly): close, friendly, intimate, personal
  • (inappropriately intimate or friendly): cheeky, fresh, impudent

Antonyms

  • (known to one): unfamiliar, unknown
  • (acquainted): unacquainted
  • (intimate): cold, cool, distant, impersonal, standoffish, unfriendly

Derived terms

  • overfamiliar
  • familiarity
  • familiarly

Related terms

  • familial

Translations

Noun

familiar (plural familiars)

  1. (witchcraft) An attendant spirit, often in animal or demon form.
  2. (obsolete) A member of one’s family or household.
  3. A member of a pope’s or bishop’s household.
  4. (obsolete) A close friend.
  5. (historical) The officer of the Inquisition who arrested suspected people.

Synonyms

  • nigget

Translations

See also

  • daimon (a tutelary spirit that guides a person)

Further reading

  • Familiar in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Adjective

familiar (masculine and feminine plural familiars)

  1. familiar

Derived terms

  • familiaritzar
  • familiarment
  • unifamiliar

Related terms

  • familiaritat

Noun

familiar m or f (plural familiars)

  1. relative

Related terms

  • família

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “familiar” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “familiar” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “familiar” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Adjective

familiar m or f (plural familiares)

  1. of family
  2. close, familiar
  3. daily, plain

Noun

familiar m (plural familiares)

  1. relative

Synonyms

  • parente
  • achegado

Related terms

  • familia
  • familiaridade
  • familiarizar

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

familiar m

  1. indefinite plural of familie

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /fɐ.mi.ˈljaʁ/

Adjective

familiar m or f (plural familiares, comparable)

  1. familiar (known to one)
  2. of or relating to a family

Derived terms

  • familiarmente

Related terms

  • familiaridade

Noun

familiar m (plural familiares)

  1. (usually in the plural) relative (person in the same family)
  2. familiar (attendant spirit)
    Synonym: espírito familiar

Related terms

  • família

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

From French familier, from Latin familiaris.

Adjective

familiar m or n (feminine singular familiară, masculine plural familiari, feminine and neuter plural familiare)

  1. familiar

Declension

Related terms

  • familiaritate

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /famiˈljaɾ/, [fa.miˈljaɾ]

Adjective

familiar (plural familiares)

  1. familial, family
  2. close, familiar
  3. daily, plain

Derived terms

Noun

familiar m (plural familiares)

  1. relative, family member
    Synonym: miembro de la familia, pariente

Related terms

  • familia
  • familiaridad
  • familiarizar

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

From Middle English felowe, felawe, felage, from Old Norse félagi (fellow, companion, associate, shareholder, colleague), from félag (partnership, literally a laying together of property), from the Germanic bases of two words represented in English by fee and law. Cognate with Scots falow, fallow, follow (associate, comrade, companion), Danish fælle (companion), Norwegian felle (companion), Faroese felagi (member, partner), Icelandic félagi (comrade, mate).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɛləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɛloʊ/
  • (informal, nonstandard) IPA(key): /ˈfɛlə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛləʊ
  • Hyphenation: fel‧low

Noun

fellow (plural fellows)

  1. (obsolete) A colleague or partner.
  2. (archaic) A companion; a comrade.
    • 1788, Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume IV
      That enormous engine was flanked by two fellows almost of equal magnitude.
  3. One of a pair, or of two things used together or suited to each other; a mate.
    • When they be but heifers of one year, [] they are let goe to the fellow and breed.
  4. A person (thing, etc) comparable in characteristics:
    1. An equal in power, rank, character, etc.
    2. (chiefly attributive) A person with common characteristics, being of the same kind, or in the same group.
      • 1888, James Francis Hogan, The Irish in Australia
        writing a history of my fellow-countrymen in Australasia
    3. (Britain slang, obsolete) Synonym of schoolmate: a student at the same school.
      • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 37:
        Adrian thought it worth while to try out his new slang. ‘I say, you fellows, here’s a rum go. Old Biffo was jolly odd this morning. He gave me a lot of pi-jaw about slacking and then invited me to tea. No rotting! He did really.’
  5. (colloquial) A male person; a man.
  6. (obsolete) A man without good breeding or worth; an ignoble or mean man.
  7. (rare, usually qualified by an adjective or used in the plural) A person; an individual, regardless of gender.
    • The cut of her dress from the waist upward, both before and behind, made her figure very like a boy’s kite; and I might have pronounced her gown a little too decidedly-orange, and her gloves a little too intensely green. But she seemed to be a good sort of fellow, and showed a high regard for the Aged.
  8. A rank or title in the professional world, usually given as “Fellow”.
    1. In the English universities, a scholar who is appointed to a foundation called a fellowship, which gives a title to certain perquisites and privileges.
    2. In an American college or university, a member of the corporation which manages its business interests; also, a graduate appointed to a fellowship, who receives the income of the foundation.
    3. A member of a literary or scientific society
      a Fellow of the Royal Society
    4. The most senior rank or title one can achieve on a technical career in certain companies (though some Fellows also hold business titles such as Vice President or Chief Technology Officer). This is typically found in large corporations in research and development-intensive industries (IBM or Sun Microsystems in information technology, and Boston Scientific in Medical Devices for example). They appoint a small number of senior scientists and engineers as Fellows.
    5. In the US and Canada, a physician who is undergoing a supervised, sub-specialty medical training (fellowship) after completing a specialty training program (residency).
  9. (Aboriginal English) Used as a general intensifier.
    • 1991, Jimmy Chi, Bran Nue Dae, in Heiss & Minter, Macquarie PEN Anthology of Aboriginal Literature, Allen & Unwin 2008, p. 137:
      This fella song all about the Aboriginal people, coloured people, black people longa Australia.

Usage notes

In North America, fellow is less likely to be used for a man in general in comparison to other words that have the same purpose. Nevertheless, it is still used by some. In addition, it has a good bit of use as an academic or medical title or membership.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:associate
  • See also Thesaurus:man

Translations

Derived terms

Verb

fellow (third-person singular simple present fellows, present participle fellowing, simple past and past participle fellowed)

  1. To suit with; to pair with; to match.

References

  • “fellow”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • elf owl

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