familiar vs intimate what difference

what is difference between familiar and intimate

English

Etymology

From Latin familiāris (pertaining to servants; pertaining to the household). Doublet of familial. Displaced native Old English hīwcūþ.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fəˈmɪl.i.ə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fəˈmɪl.jɚ/, /fəˈmɪl.i.ɚ/, /fɚˈmɪl.jɚ/

Adjective

familiar (comparative more familiar, superlative most familiar)

  1. Known to one, or generally known; commonplace.
  2. Acquainted.
  3. Intimate or friendly.
  4. Inappropriately intimate or friendly.
  5. Of or pertaining to a family; familial.
    • 1822, Lord Byron, Werner
      familiar feuds

Synonyms

  • (acquainted): acquainted
  • (intimate, friendly): close, friendly, intimate, personal
  • (inappropriately intimate or friendly): cheeky, fresh, impudent

Antonyms

  • (known to one): unfamiliar, unknown
  • (acquainted): unacquainted
  • (intimate): cold, cool, distant, impersonal, standoffish, unfriendly

Derived terms

  • overfamiliar
  • familiarity
  • familiarly

Related terms

  • familial

Translations

Noun

familiar (plural familiars)

  1. (witchcraft) An attendant spirit, often in animal or demon form.
  2. (obsolete) A member of one’s family or household.
  3. A member of a pope’s or bishop’s household.
  4. (obsolete) A close friend.
  5. (historical) The officer of the Inquisition who arrested suspected people.

Synonyms

  • nigget

Translations

See also

  • daimon (a tutelary spirit that guides a person)

Further reading

  • Familiar in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Adjective

familiar (masculine and feminine plural familiars)

  1. familiar

Derived terms

  • familiaritzar
  • familiarment
  • unifamiliar

Related terms

  • familiaritat

Noun

familiar m or f (plural familiars)

  1. relative

Related terms

  • família

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “familiar” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “familiar” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “familiar” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Adjective

familiar m or f (plural familiares)

  1. of family
  2. close, familiar
  3. daily, plain

Noun

familiar m (plural familiares)

  1. relative

Synonyms

  • parente
  • achegado

Related terms

  • familia
  • familiaridade
  • familiarizar

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

familiar m

  1. indefinite plural of familie

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /fɐ.mi.ˈljaʁ/

Adjective

familiar m or f (plural familiares, comparable)

  1. familiar (known to one)
  2. of or relating to a family

Derived terms

  • familiarmente

Related terms

  • familiaridade

Noun

familiar m (plural familiares)

  1. (usually in the plural) relative (person in the same family)
  2. familiar (attendant spirit)
    Synonym: espírito familiar

Related terms

  • família

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

From French familier, from Latin familiaris.

Adjective

familiar m or n (feminine singular familiară, masculine plural familiari, feminine and neuter plural familiare)

  1. familiar

Declension

Related terms

  • familiaritate

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin familiāris.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /famiˈljaɾ/, [fa.miˈljaɾ]

Adjective

familiar (plural familiares)

  1. familial, family
  2. close, familiar
  3. daily, plain

Derived terms

Noun

familiar m (plural familiares)

  1. relative, family member
    Synonym: miembro de la familia, pariente

Related terms

  • familia
  • familiaridad
  • familiarizar

Further reading

  • “familiar” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

From Latin intimare (to put or bring into, to impress, to make familiar), from intimus (inmost, innermost, most intimate), superlative of intus (within), from in (in); see interior.

Pronunciation

Adjective, noun

  • enPR: ĭn’tĭmət, IPA(key): /ˈɪn.tɪ.mət/

Verb

  • enPR: ĭn’tĭmāt, IPA(key): /ˈɪn.tɪ.meɪt/

Adjective

intimate (comparative more intimate, superlative most intimate)

  1. Closely acquainted; familiar.
    an intimate friend
    He and his sister deeply valued their intimate relationship as they didn’t have much else to live for.
  2. Of or involved in a sexual relationship.
    She enjoyed some intimate time alone with her husband.
  3. Personal; private.
    an intimate setting
  4. Pertaining to details that require great familiarity to know.

Translations

Noun

intimate (plural intimates)

  1. A very close friend.
    Only a couple of intimates had ever read his writing.
  2. (in plural intimates) Women’s underwear, sleepwear, or lingerie, especially offered for sale in a store.
    You’ll find bras and panties in the women’s intimates section upstairs.

Synonyms

  • (close friend): bosom buddy, bosom friend, cater-cousin

Translations

Verb

intimate (third-person singular simple present intimates, present participle intimating, simple past and past participle intimated)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To suggest or disclose (something) discreetly.
    •     The Kaiser beamed. Von Bulow had praised him. Von Bulow had exalted him and humbled himself. The Kaiser could forgive anything after that. “Haven’t I always told you,” he exclaimed with enthusiasm, “that we complete one another famously? We should stick together, and we will!”
          […]
          Von Bulow saved himself in time—but, canny diplomat that he was, he nevertheless had made one error: he should have begun by talking about his own shortcomings and Wilhelm’s superiority—not by intimating that the Kaiser was a half-wit in need of a guardian.
    He intimated that we should leave before the argument escalated.
  2. (transitive, India) To notify.
    I will intimate you when the details are available.

Translations

Related terms

  • intimacy
  • intimation

Further reading

  • intimate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • intimate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • antitime

Esperanto

Adverb

intimate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of intimi

Italian

Verb

intimate

  1. inflection of intimare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of intimato

Anagrams

  • Mainetti, imitante

Latin

Verb

intimāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of intimō

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