fan vs rooter what difference

what is difference between fan and rooter

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fæn/
  • (æ-tensing) IPA(key): [feən]
  • Rhymes: -æn
  • Homophones: faan, fanne

Etymology 1

From Middle English fan, from Old English fann (a winnowing, fan), from Latin vannus (fan for winnowing grain), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂weh₁- (to blow). Cognate with
Latin ventus (wind), Dutch wan (fan), German Wanne, Swedish vanna (a fan for winnowing), Old English windwian (to fan, winnow). More at winnow.

Noun

fan (plural fans)

  1. A hand-held device consisting of concertinaed material, or slats of material, gathered together at one end, that may be opened out into the shape of a sector of a circle and waved back and forth in order to move air towards oneself and cool oneself.
  2. An electrical or mechanical device for moving air, used for cooling people, machinery, etc.
  3. The action of fanning; agitation of the air.
    • 1998, Brock Thoene, Bodie Thoene, A New Frontier: Saga of the Sierras (page 181)
      “If I cannot be of service, then I certainly don’t wish to impose,” said McGinty, with a quick fan of breeze that indicated a sweeping bow.
  4. Anything resembling a hand-held fan in shape, e.g., a peacock’s tail.
  5. An instrument for winnowing grain, by moving which the grain is tossed and agitated, and the chaff is separated and blown away.
    • The oxen likewise and the yong asses that eare the ground, shall eate cleane prouender which hath bene winnowed with the shouell and with the fanne.
    • Whose fanne is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floore, and gather his wheat into the garner: but wil burne vp the chaffe with vnquenchable fire.
  6. A small vane or sail, used to keep the large sails of a smock mill always in the direction of the wind.
  7. (mathematics) A section of a tree having a finite number of branches
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fan (third-person singular simple present fans, present participle fanning, simple past and past participle fanned)

  1. (transitive) To blow air on (something) by means of a fan (hand-held, mechanical or electrical) or otherwise.
    We enjoyed standing at the edge of the cliff, being fanned by the wind.
  2. (transitive) To slap (a behind, especially).
  3. (intransitive, usually to fan out) To move or spread in multiple directions from one point, in the shape of a hand-held fan.
  4. (transitive) To dispel by waving a hand-held fan.
  5. (firearms, transitive) To perform a maneuver that involves flicking the top rear of an old-style gun.
  6. (metaphoric) To invigorate, like flames when fanned.
  7. To winnow grain.
  8. (rail transport, transitive) To apply (the air brake) many times in rapid succession.
  9. (baseball, intransitive) To strike out.
  10. (baseball, transitive) To strike out (a batter).
Derived terms
  • fanner

Related terms

  • (to firing a revolver by holding trigger and hitting hammer) thumbing
Translations

Etymology 2

Clipping of fanatic, originally in US baseball slang. Possibly influenced by fancy (group of sport or hobby enthusiasts), fancy boy (fan), &c.

Noun

fan (plural fans or fen)

  1. A person who is fond of something or someone, especially an admirer of a performer or aficionado of a sport.
Usage notes

The plural fen is only used within science fiction fandom. See fen, etymology 3, for more information.

Synonyms
  • See Thesaurus:fan
Antonyms
  • hater
Derived terms
Translations
Descendants
References
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “fan”, in Online Etymology Dictionary, retrieved 1 January 2017: “1889, American English, originally of baseball enthusiasts, probably a shortening of fanatic, but it may be influenced by the fancy, a collective term for followers of a certain hobby or sport (especially boxing)”.

Anagrams

  • AFN, ANF, FNA, NAF, NFA

Bambara

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fã˦ã˨]

Etymology 1

Noun

fan

  1. egg

Etymology 2

Noun

fan

  1. direction, side

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.
  • Richard Nci Diarra, Lexique bambara-français-anglais, December 13, 2010

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -an

Verb

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of fer

Chibcha

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /βan/

Noun

fan

  1. Alternative form of ban

References

  • Gómez Aldana D. F., Análisis morfológico del Vocabulario 158 de la Biblioteca Nacional de Colombia. Grupo de Investigación Muysccubun. 2013.
  • Quesada Pacheco, Miguel Ángel. 1991. El vocabulario mosco de 1612. En estudios de Lingüística Chibcha. Programa de investigación del departamento de lingüística de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Serie Anual Tomo X San José (Costa Rica). Universidad de Costa Rica.

Chuukese

Noun

fan

  1. church (building)
  2. time (instance or occurrence)
    • Jesus a apasa ngeni Peter, “Upwe apasa ngonuk pwe non ei chok pwinin me mwen ewe chukȯ epwe kökkö, fan unungat kopwe apasa pwe kose sinei ei.”

      Jesus said to Peter, “I tell you that in this night before the chicken calls, three times you will say that you don’t know me.”

Preposition

fan

  1. under

Cimbrian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Preposition

fan (Sette Comuni)

  1. on
  2. in

Usage notes

Often used in conjunction with adverbs, such as au (up), übar (over), abe (down).

References

  • “fan” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • (Belgium) IPA(key): /fɑn/
  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /fɛn/

Etymology

Borrowed from English fan.

Noun

fan m (plural fans, diminutive fannetje n)

  1. fan (admirer)

Synonyms

  • aanhanger
  • bewonderaar
  • supporter

Finnish

Noun

fan

  1. fan, admirer, aficionado

Declension

Synonyms

  • fani

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fan/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English fan, 1920s.

Noun

fan m or f (plural fans)

  1. fan (admirer, supporter)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English fan.

Noun

fan f (plural fans)

  1. (Canada) fan (ventilator)

Further reading

  • “fan” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin famēs.

Noun

fan f

  1. hunger

Related terms

  • famâ

Galician

Verb

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of facer

Gothic

Romanization

fan

  1. Romanization of ????????????

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɒn]
  • Hyphenation: fan

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *puna (hair). Possibly a doublet of pina.

Noun

fan (plural fanok)

  1. (obsolete) pubis
    Synonyms: (the region) szeméremtájék, (the bone) szeméremcsont, (mons pubis) szeméremdomb
  2. (obsolete) pubic hair
    Synonyms: szeméremszőrzet, fanszőrzet
Usage notes

Today it is used only in compounds.

Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From English fan.

Noun

fan (plural fanok)

  1. (neologism, colloquial) fan (a person who is fond of something or someone, especially an admirer of a performer or aficionado of a sport)
    Synonym: rajongó
Declension

References

Further reading

  • (pubis): fan in Czuczor, Gergely and János Fogarasi: A magyar nyelv szótára (’A Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Pest: Emich Gusztáv Magyar Akadémiai Nyomdász, 1862–1874.
  • (pubis): fan at A Pallas nagy lexikona, Pallas Irodalmi és Nyomdai Rt., Budapest, 1897
  • (pubis): László Országh, Magyar–angol szótár (“Hungarian–English Dictionary”), Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1977

Indonesian

Etymology

From English fan (a person who is fond of something or someone), clipping of fanatic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɛn]
  • Hyphenation: fan

Noun

fan (first-person possessive fanku, second-person possessive fanmu, third-person possessive fannya)

  1. fan: a person who is fond of something or someone.
    Synonyms: pengagum, penggemar

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading

  • “fan” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Etymology

From Middle Irish fanaid, from Old Irish anaid (to stay, remain, abide).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fˠanˠ/

Verb

fan (present analytic fanann, future analytic fanfaidh, verbal noun fanacht, past participle fanta)

  1. to wait
  2. to stay

Conjugation

Mutation


Istriot

Etymology

From Latin fāmes.

Noun

fan

  1. hunger

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English fan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfan/, /ˈfɛn/

Noun

fan m or f (plural fans)

  1. fan (admirer or follower)

References


Kanuri

Verb

fàn+

  1. hear
  2. understand
  3. feel

Mandarin

Romanization

fan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of fān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of fán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of fǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of fàn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English fann, from Latin vannus. Forms in v- are due to a combination of Southern Middle English voicing of initial fricatives and influence from the ultimate Latin etymon.

Alternative forms

  • fanne, ffanne, vanne

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fan/, /van/

Noun

fan (plural fannes)

  1. A mechanism or device for removing chaff from grain (i.e. winnowing).
  2. A training or practice shield manufactured out of twigs or wickerwork.
  3. (rare) A fan; a device for blowing air as to cool.
Descendants
  • English: fan, van
  • Scots: fan
References
  • “fan(ne, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-12-31.

Etymology 2

Verb

fan

  1. Alternative form of fannen

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English fan, where it was a clipping of fanatic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fæn/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

fan m (definite singular fanen, indefinite plural fans, definite plural fanane)

  1. (countable) a fan (person who is fond of someone or something)

Etymology 2

Noun

fan m

  1. (swear word, in juxtapositions) Alternative form of faen

References

  • “fan” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Occitan

Pronunciation

Verb

fan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of faire

Old Dutch

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *fanē.

Preposition

fan

  1. off, from
Descendants
  • Middle Dutch: van
    • Dutch: van
      • Afrikaans: van
      • Berbice Creole Dutch: fan
      • Javindo: fan
      • Jersey Dutch: vān, fān
      • Negerhollands: van, fan, fa
        • Virgin Islands Creole: fam
      • Skepi Creole Dutch: fan
    • Limburgish: ven
Further reading
  • “fan”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *fanhaną.

Verb

fān

  1. to catch
Inflection

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms
  • anafān
  • antfān
  • bifān
Descendants
  • Middle Dutch: vâen
    • Dutch: vangen
      • Afrikaans: vang
      • Berbice Creole Dutch: fanggi
      • Negerhollands: vang, faṅ
      • Skepi Creole Dutch: fank
    • Limburgish: vange
Further reading
  • “fān”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Saxon

Alternative forms

  • fana, fon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *afanē, *fanē, whence also Old High German fon.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɑn/

Preposition

fan

  1. from

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: van, von
    • Dutch Low Saxon: van
    • German Low German: van, von, vun

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fan/

Noun

fan m pers (feminine fanka)

  1. fan (admirer)

Declension

Synonyms

  • (admirer): entuzjasta, wielbiciel, miłośnik, zapaleniec

Related terms

  • fanklub
  • fandom
  • fanzin
  • fanowski

Further reading

  • fan in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Rohingya

Noun

fan

  1. betel leaf

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish anaid, fanaid (stays, remains, abides).

Verb

fan (past dh’fhan, future fanaidh, verbal noun fantail or fantainn or fanachd)

  1. stay, remain
  2. wait

Synonyms

  • feith
  • fuirich

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fan.

Noun

fan m or f (plural fans)

  1. fan
    Synonyms: aficionado, admirador, entusiasta, fanático, hincha

Derived terms

  • club de fans

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Late Old Norse fendinn, perhaps from Old Frisian fandiand, present participle of fandia (tempt), from Proto-Germanic *fandōną (seek, search for, examine). Cognate with Danish fanden and Norwegian Bokmål faen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaːn/, /ˈfaːˌa(ː)n/

Noun

fan c

  1. the devil, Satan
    fan ta dig.

    May the devil take you.
    Du var mig en jobbig fan.

    You’re one tricky little devil.

Interjection

fan

  1. damn (referring to the devil)
    Fan! Jag glömde nycklarna.

    Damn! I forgot my keys.

Derived terms

  • det vete fan
  • fanskap
  • ge fan i
  • måla fan på väggen
  • nu är fan lös

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English fan, short for fanatic, related to the Swedish words fanatisk and fanatiker.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛːn/
  • Homophone: fän

Noun

fan c or n

  1. fan (admirer)
    jag är ett stort fan av saffransbullar

    I’m a huge fan of saffron buns
Declension

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Low German fan, used since 1772, closely related to Swedish fana (flag).

Noun

fan n

  1. vane, web (part of the anatomy of a bird’s feather)
Declension

Tboli

Noun

fan

  1. bait

Uzbek

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic فَنّ(fann).

Noun

fan (plural fanlar)

  1. science

Synonyms

  • ilm

Welsh

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English van.

Noun

fan f (plural faniau, not mutable)

  1. van

Etymology 2

Noun

fan

  1. Soft mutation of man.
Mutation

Etymology 3

Noun

fan

  1. Soft mutation of ban.
Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “fan”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian fon, from Proto-Germanic *fanē.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔn/

Preposition

fan

  1. from
  2. of

Further reading

  • “fan (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English whanne, from Old English hwænne, from Proto-West Germanic *hwannā.

Adverb

fan

  1. when?

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From root +‎ -er.

Noun

rooter (plural rooters)

  1. One who, or that which, roots; one that tears up by the roots.
  2. One who roots or rummages through something.
    • 1969, Stephen King, The Reaper’s Image
      Like so many of the self-made industry emperors of the late 1800s, he had been little more than a pawnshop rooter masquerading in collector’s clothing, a connoisseur of canvas monstrosities, trashy novels and poetry collections []

Etymology 2

From root (to cheer for) +‎ -er.

Noun

rooter (plural rooters)

  1. (US, slang) One who roots for, or applauds, something.
Translations

Anagrams

  • reroot, torero

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