fanatic vs overzealous what difference

what is difference between fanatic and overzealous

English

Alternative forms

  • fanatick (obsolete)

Etymology

First attested in 1525. From Latin fānāticus (of a temple, divinely inspired, frenzied), from fānum (temple). Influenced by French fanatique.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fəˈnæt.ɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ætɪk

Adjective

fanatic (comparative more fanatic, superlative most fanatic)

  1. Fanatical.
    • T. Moore
      But Faith, fanatic Faith, once wedded fast / To some dear falsehood, hugs it to the last.
  2. (obsolete) Showing evidence of possession by a god or demon; frenzied, overzealous.

Translations

Noun

fanatic (plural fanatics)

  1. A person who is zealously enthusiastic for some cause, especially in religion.

Translations

See also

  • fan
  • crank
  • extremist

Quotations

  • A zealot can’t change his mind. A fanatic can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject. —Winston Churchill (attributed)
  • A fanatic is one who redoubles his effort when he has forgotten his aim. —George Santayana

Anagrams

  • actifan

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin fānāticus.

Pronunciation

Adjective

fanatic m (feminine singular fanatica, masculine plural fanatics, feminine plural fanaticas)

  1. fanatical

Romanian

Etymology

From French fanatique, from Latin fanaticus.

Adjective

fanatic m or n (feminine singular fanatică, masculine plural fanatici, feminine and neuter plural fanatice)

  1. fanatic

Declension



English

Alternative forms

  • over-zealous

Etymology

From over- +‎ zealous.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˌə͡ʊvəˈzɛləs/

Adjective

overzealous (comparative more overzealous, superlative most overzealous)

  1. Too zealous; too enthusiastic or fervent.
    With his overzealous attempts to impress, he only managed to annoy her.

Translations


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