fantastic vs grotesque what difference

what is difference between fantastic and grotesque

English

Alternative forms

  • fantastick, phantastick (obsolete)
  • phantastic
  • phantastique (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French fantastique, from Late Latin phantasticus, from Ancient Greek φᾰντᾰστῐκός (phantastikós, imaginary, fantastic; fictional), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to shine). Doublet of fantastique.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fænˈtæstɪk/
  • Rhymes: -æstɪk

Adjective

fantastic (comparative more fantastic, superlative most fantastic)

  1. Existing in or constructed from fantasy; of or relating to fantasy; fanciful.
  2. Not believable; implausible; seemingly only possible in fantasy.
  3. Resembling fantasies in irregularity, caprice, or eccentricity; irregular; grotesque.
    • T. Gray
      There at the foot of yonder nodding beech, / That wreathes its old fantastic roots so high.
  4. Wonderful; marvelous; excellent; extraordinarily good or great (used especially as an intensifier).

Synonyms

  • (based in fantasy rather than reality): fabulous, fantastical
  • (extravagantly fanciful and unrealistic): foolish, hare-brained, unrealistic, wild
  • (incredibly wonderful): brilliant, fabulous, splendid, super, wonderful
  • See also Thesaurus:excellent

Antonyms

  • (incredibly wonderful): sucktastic

Derived terms

  • fantastical
  • fantastically

Related terms

  • fantasy
  • fantasise, fantasize

Translations

Noun

fantastic (plural fantastics)

  1. (archaic) A fanciful or whimsical person.

Anagrams

  • anti-facts

Romanian

Etymology

From French fantastique, from Latin phantasticus.

Adjective

fantastic m or n (feminine singular fantastică, masculine plural fantastici, feminine and neuter plural fantastice)

  1. fantastic

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle French grotesque (French grotesque), from Italian grottesco (of a cave), from grotta. Compare English grotto.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡɹəʊˈtɛsk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡɹoʊˈtɛsk/

Adjective

grotesque (comparative grotesquer, superlative grotesquest)

  1. Distorted and unnatural in shape or size; abnormal and hideous.
  2. Disgusting or otherwise viscerally revolting.
  3. (typography) Sans serif.

Derived terms

  • grody
  • grotty
  • guro, ero-guro

Translations

Noun

grotesque (countable and uncountable, plural grotesques)

  1. A style of ornamentation characterized by fanciful combinations of intertwined forms.
  2. Anything grotesque.
  3. (typography) A sans serif typeface.

Related terms

  • grotesquely
  • grotesqueness

Further reading

  • Grotesque in the 1905 edition of the New International Encyclopedia.

French

Etymology

From Middle French grotesque, from Italian grottesco (of a cave), from grotta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɔ.tɛsk/

Adjective

grotesque (plural grotesques)

  1. farcical (ridiculous)
  2. grotesque

Noun

grotesque m (plural grotesques)

  1. grotesqueness

Further reading

  • “grotesque” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • crotesque

Etymology

From Italian grottesco.

Adjective

grotesque m or f (plural grotesques)

  1. farcical (ridiculous)

Descendants

  • English: grotesque
  • French: grotesque

Noun

grotesque f (plural grotesques)

  1. small cave
  2. ornament

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (grotesque, supplement)

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