farce vs forcemeat what difference

what is difference between farce and forcemeat

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɑːs/
  • (General American) enPR: färs, IPA(key): /fɑɹs/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle French farce (comic interlude in a mystery play, literally stuffing).

Noun

farce (countable and uncountable, plural farces)

  1. (uncountable) A style of humor marked by broad improbabilities with little regard to regularity or method.
  2. (countable) A motion picture or play featuring this style of humor.
  3. (uncountable) A situation abounding with ludicrous incidents.
  4. (uncountable) A ridiculous or empty show.
Derived terms
  • farcical
Translations

Etymology 2

Verb from Middle English farcen, from Old French farsir, farcir, from Latin farciō (to cram, stuff).

Verb

farce (third-person singular simple present farces, present participle farcing, simple past and past participle farced)

  1. (transitive) To stuff with forcemeat or other food items.
    • 1923, Walter de la Mare, Seaton’s Aunt
      The lunch [] consisted [] of [] lobster mayonnaise, cold game sausages, an immense veal and ham pie farced with eggs, truffles, and numberless delicious flavours; besides kickshaws, creams and sweetmeats.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To fill full; to stuff.
    • 1678, Robert Sanderson, Pax Ecclesiae
      The first principles of religion should not be farced with school points and private tenets.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To make fat.
    • 1599, Ben Jonson, Every Man out of His Humour
      if thou wouldst farce thy lean ribs
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To swell out; to render pompous.
    • 1615, George Sandys, The Relation of a Journey begun an. Dom. 1610, in four books
      farcing his letter with fustian
Translations

Noun

farce

  1. (cooking) Forcemeat, stuffing.

Further reading

  • farce in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • farce in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • farce at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Facer, facer

Czech

Noun

farce

  1. dative singular of farka
  2. locative singular of farka

French

Etymology

From Old French farse, from Medieval Latin farsa, feminine perfect passive participle from farcīre, from farciō (I stuff). The theatre sense alludes to the pleasant and varied character of certain stuffed food items.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faʁs/

Noun

farce f (plural farces)

  1. (cooking) stuffing
  2. (theater) farce

Derived terms

Related terms

  • farcir

Descendants

Further reading

  • “farce” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

References


Hausa

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fáɽ.t͡ʃèː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [ɸáɽ.t͡ʃèː]

Noun

farcḕ m (plural farā̀tā, possessed form farcèn)

  1. fingernail
    Synonym: ƙumba

Italian

Noun

farce f

  1. plural of farcia

Anagrams

  • cafre

Norman

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

farce f (plural farces)

  1. (Jersey) batter


English

Etymology

force +‎ meat, the former element a variant of obsolete farce (to stuff) influenced by force, itself from French farcir (to stuff).

Noun

forcemeat (countable and uncountable, plural forcemeats)

  1. (cooking) An emulsion of fat and comminuted meat (which has been subject to puréeing, grinding, sieving, chopping finely) optionally mixed with other flavour carriers and either served up alone or used as a stuffing.
    Meronym: meat

Translations

References

  • forcemeat in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • aftercome, come after

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