farcical vs ridiculous what difference

what is difference between farcical and ridiculous

English

Etymology

farce +‎ -ical, after comical etc.

Adjective

farcical (comparative more farcical, superlative most farcical)

  1. Resembling a farce; ludicrous; absurd.

Related terms

  • farce

Translations

Further reading

  • farcical in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • farcical in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • farcical at OneLook Dictionary Search


English

Alternative forms

  • rediculous (archaic, eye dialect, or misspelling)
  • radiculous (rare, obsolete)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin rīdiculus (laughable, ridiculous); see ridicule.

Pronunciation

  • (Canada, UK, US) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈdɪkjʊləs/, /ɹiːˈdɪkjʊləs/
  • (Wales) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈdɪkləs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪkjələs

Adjective

ridiculous (comparative more ridiculous, superlative most ridiculous)

  1. Deserving of ridicule; foolish; absurd.
    Synonyms: silly, willy nilly, frivolous, goofy, funny, humorous, absurd, odd, surreal, unreasonable; see also Thesaurus:absurd
    Antonyms: straightforward, serious, somber, solemn
  2. Astonishing; unbelievable.

Derived terms

  • ridic
  • ridiculousness

Related terms

  • deride
  • derision
  • ridicule
  • ridiculable
  • ridiculosity
  • ridiculously

Translations

Further reading

  • ridiculous at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • ridiculous in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • ridiculous in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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