farm vs raise what difference

what is difference between farm and raise

English

Pronunciation

  • (US, Canada) enPR: färm, IPA(key): /fɑːɹm/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɑːm/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)m

Etymology 1

From Middle English ferme, farme (rent, revenue, produce, factor, stewardship, meal, feast), influenced by Anglo-Norman ferme (rent, lease, farm), from Medieval Latin ferma, firma. Both from Old English feorm, fearm, farm (provision, food, supplies, provisions supplied by a tenant or vassal to his lord, rent, possessions, stores, feast, entertainment, haven), from Proto-Germanic *fermō (means of living, subsistence), from Proto-Germanic *ferhwō, *ferhuz (life force, body, being), from Proto-Indo-European *perkʷ- (life, force, strength, tree).

Cognate with Scots ferm (rent, farm). Related also to Old English feorh (life, spirit), Old High German ferah (life, body, being), Icelandic fjör (life, vitality, vigour, animation), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (fairƕus, the world). Compare also Old English feormehām (farm), feormere (purveyor, grocer).

Old English feorm is the origin of Medieval Latin ferma, firma (farm”, also “feast) (whence also Old French ferme, Occitan ferma), instead of the historically assumed derivation from unrelated Latin firma (firm, solid), which shares the same form. The sense of “rent, fixed payment”, which was already present in the Old English word, may have been further strengthened due to resemblance to Latin firmitas (security, surety). Additionally, Old French ferme continued to shape the development of the English word throughout the Middle English period.

Alternative forms

  • feorm (historical)
  • ferme (obsolete)

Noun

farm (plural farms)

  1. A place where agricultural and similar activities take place, especially the growing of crops or the raising of livestock.
  2. A tract of land held on lease for the purpose of cultivation.
  3. (usually in combination) A location used for an industrial purpose, having many similar structures
  4. (computing) A group of coordinated servers.
  5. (obsolete) Food; provisions; a meal.
  6. (obsolete) A banquet; feast.
  7. (obsolete) A fixed yearly amount (food, provisions, money, etc.) payable as rent or tax.
    • 1642, tr. J. Perkins, Profitable Bk. (new ed.) xi. §751. 329:
      If a man be bounden unto 1.s. in 100.l.£ to grant unto him the rent and farme of such a Mill.
    • 1700, J. Tyrrell, Gen. Hist. Eng. II. 814:
      All..Tythings shall stand at the old Farm, without any Increase.
    • 1767, W. Blackstone, Comm. Laws Eng. II. 320:
      The most usual and customary feorm or rent..must be reserved yearly on such lease.
  8. (historical) A fixed yearly sum accepted from a person as a composition for taxes or other moneys which he is empowered to collect; also, a fixed charge imposed on a town, county, etc., in respect of a tax or taxes to be collected within its limits.
    • 1876, E. A. Freeman, Hist. Norman Conquest V. xxiv. 439:
      He [the Sheriff] paid into the Exchequer the fixed yearly sum which formed the farm of the shire.
  9. (historical) The letting-out of public revenue to a ‘farmer’; the privilege of farming a tax or taxes.
    • 1885, Edwards in Encycl. Brit. XIX. 580:
      The first farm of postal income was made in 1672.
  10. The body of farmers of public revenues.
    • 1786, T. Jefferson, Writings (1859) I. 568:
      They despair of a suppression of the Farm.
  11. The condition of being let at a fixed rent; lease; a lease.
    • a1599, Spenser, View State Ireland in J. Ware Two Hist. Ireland (1633) 58:
      It is a great willfullnes in any such Land-lord to refuse to make any longer farmes unto their Tennants.
    • 1647, N. Bacon, Hist. Disc. Govt. 75:
      Thence the Leases so made were called Feormes or Farmes, which word signifieth Victuals.
    • 1818, W. Cruise, Digest Laws Eng. Real Prop. (ed. 2) IV. 68:
      The words demise, lease, and to farm let, are the proper ones to constitute a lease.
Derived terms
Translations
Descendants
  • German: Farm
  • Portuguese: farme, farma
  • Yiddish: פֿאַרם(farm)

Verb

farm (third-person singular simple present farms, present participle farming, simple past and past participle farmed)

  1. (intransitive) To work on a farm, especially in the growing and harvesting of crops.
  2. (transitive) To devote (land) to farming.
  3. (transitive) To grow (a particular crop).
  4. To give up to another, as an estate, a business, the revenue, etc., on condition of receiving in return a percentage of what it yields; to farm out.
    • December 1, 1783, Edmund Burke, Speech on Mr. Fox’s East-India Bill
      to farm their subjects and their duties toward these
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To lease or let for an equivalent, e.g. land for a rent; to yield the use of to proceeds.
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To take at a certain rent or rate.
    • 1886, The Fortnightly (volume 46, page 530)
      In Paris it is stated that nearly half the birth-rate of the city finds its way to nurses who farm babies in the suburbs.
  7. (video games, chiefly online gaming) To engage in grinding (repetitive activity) in a particular area or against specific enemies for a particular drop or item.
    • 2004, “Doug Freyburger”, Pudding Farming Requires Care (on newsgroup rec.games.roguelike.nethack)
      When you hit a black pudding with an iron weapon that does at least one point of damage there is a good chance it will divide into two black puddings of the same size (but half the hit points IIRC). [] When eaten black puddings confer several intrinsics so AC [armor class] is not the only potential benefit. [] Since black puddings are formidible[sic] monsters for an inexperienced character, farming is also a good way to die.
    • 2010, Robert Alan Brookey, Hollywood Gamers (page 130)
      The practice of gold farming is controversial within gaming communities and violates the end user licensing agreements []
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • agriculture
  • north forty
References

Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Further reading
  • farm on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English fermen, from Old English feormian (to clean, cleanse), from Proto-West Germanic *furbēn (to clean, polish, buff). Doublet of furbish.

Verb

farm (third-person singular simple present farms, present participle farming, simple past and past participle farmed)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) To cleanse; clean out; put in order; empty; empty out
    Farm out the stable and pigsty.

Anagrams

  • AFRM

Dalmatian

Alternative forms

  • fiarm

Etymology

From Latin firmus. Compare Italian fermo.

Adjective

farm

  1. still, firm, steady, stationary

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

farm

  1. first-person singular present indicative of farmen
  2. imperative of farmen

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from English farm.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɒrm]
  • Hyphenation: farm
  • Rhymes: -ɒrm

Noun

farm (plural farmok)

  1. farm
    Synonyms: tanya, gazdaság, birtok, földbirtok

Declension

References

Further reading

  • farm in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic

Noun

farm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of farmur

Volapük

Noun

farm (nominative plural farms)

  1. farm

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rāz, IPA(key): /ɹeɪz/
  • Homophones: rase, rays, raze, rehs, réis, res
  • Rhymes: -eɪz

Etymology 1

From Middle English reysen, raisen, reisen, from Old Norse reisa (to raise), from Proto-Germanic *raisijaną, *raizijaną (to raise), causative form of Proto-Germanic *rīsaną (to rise), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rey- (to rise, arise). Cognate with Old English rāsian (to explore, examine, research), Old English rīsan (to seize, carry off), Old English rǣran (to cause to rise, raise, rear, build, create). Doublet of rear.

Verb

raise (third-person singular simple present raises, present participle raising, simple past and past participle raised)

  1. (physical) To cause to rise; to lift or elevate.
    1. To form by the accumulation of materials or constituent parts; to build up; to erect.
    2. To cause something to come to the surface of the sea.
    3. (nautical) To cause (the land or any other object) to seem higher by drawing nearer to it.
    4. To make (bread, etc.) light, as by yeast or leaven.
    5. (figuratively) To cause (a dead person) to live again; to resurrect.
    6. (military) To remove or break up (a blockade), either by withdrawing the ships or forces employed in enforcing it, or by driving them away or dispersing them.
    7. (military, transitive) To relinquish (a siege), or cause this to be done.
  2. (transitive) To create, increase or develop.
    1. To collect or amass.
    2. To bring up; to grow; to promote.
    3. To mention (a question, issue) for discussion.
    4. (law) To create; to constitute (a use, or a beneficial interest in property).
    5. To bring into being; to produce; to cause to arise, come forth, or appear.
  3. To establish contact with (e.g., by telephone or radio).
  4. (poker, intransitive) To respond to a bet by increasing the amount required to continue in the hand.
  5. (arithmetic) To exponentiate, to involute.
  6. (linguistics, transitive, of a verb) To extract (a subject or other verb argument) out of an inner clause.
  7. (linguistics, transitive, of a vowel) To produce a vowel with the tongue positioned closer to the roof of the mouth.
  8. To increase the nominal value of (a cheque, money order, etc.) by fraudulently changing the writing or printing in which the sum payable is specified.
  9. (programming, transitive) To instantiate and transmit (an exception, by throwing it, or an event).
    • 2007, Bruce Bukovics, Pro WF: Windows Workflow in .NET 3.0 (page 243)
      Provide some mechanism in the local service class to raise the event. This might take the form of a public method that the host application can invoke to raise the event.
Usage notes
  • It is standard US English to raise children, and this usage has become common in all kinds of English since the 1700s. Until fairly recently, however, US teachers taught the traditional rule that one should raise crops and animals, but rear children, despite the fact that this contradicted general usage. It is therefore not surprising that some people still prefer “to rear children” and that this is considered correct but formal in US English. Modern British English also prefers “raise” over “rear”.
  • It is generally considered incorrect to say rear crops or (adult) animals in US English, but this expression is (or was until relatively recently) common in British English.
Synonyms
  • (to cause to rise): lift
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

raise (plural raises)

  1. (US) An increase in wages or salary; a rise (UK).
    The boss gave me a raise.
  2. (weightlifting) A shoulder exercise in which the arms are elevated against resistance.
  3. (curling) A shot in which the delivered stone bumps another stone forward.
  4. (poker) A bet that increases the previous bet.
Derived terms
  • lateral raise
  • leg raise
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hreysi; the spelling came about under the influence of the folk etymology that derived it from the verb.

Noun

raise (plural raises)

  1. A cairn or pile of stones.
Translations

Further reading

  • raise on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Aesir, Aries, ERISA, Resia, aesir, aires, arise, reais, serai

Middle English

Noun

raise

  1. Alternative form of reys

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