farmer vs husbandman what difference

what is difference between farmer and husbandman

English

Etymology

From Middle English fermor, fermer, fermour (a steward, bailliff, collector of taxes), partly from Old French fermier (a farmer, a lessee, husbandman, bailliff), from Medieval Latin firmarius (one to whom land is rented, a collector of taxes, deputy), from firma, see farm; and partly from Old English feormere (a purveyor of a guild, a supplier of food, a grocer, farmer), from feormian (to purvey, supply, feed), equivalent to farm +‎ -er. More at farm.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɑɹmɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɑːmə/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)mə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: farm‧er

Noun

farmer (plural farmers)

  1. A person who works the land and/or who keeps livestock, especially on a farm.
  2. Agent noun of farm; someone or something that farms.
    Hyponym: baby farmer
  3. (historical) One who takes taxes, customs, excise, or other duties, to collect for a certain rate per cent.
  4. (historical, mining) The lord of the field, or one who farms the lot and cope of the crown.

Usage notes

Farmer is probably the last occupational descriptor to have been used as a prefix to a surname in everyday usage: e.g. Farmer Brown. This usage was common until the mid 20th century.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Yiddish: פֿאַרמער(farmer)

Translations

Anagrams

  • framer

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɒrmɛr]
  • Hyphenation: far‧mer
  • Rhymes: -ɛr

Etymology 1

From the German Farmer, from the French fermier (farmer), from the Old French ferme (farm, rental), from the Medieval Latin ferma, firma (rent, tribute, food, feast), from Old English feorm (rent, provisions, supplies, feast). More at farm.

Noun

farmer (plural farmerek)

  1. farmer
Declension

See also

  • földműves
  • földművelő
  • gazda

Etymology 2

Shortening of farmeröltözet or farmernadrág.

Adjective

farmer (not comparable)

  1. denim
Declension

Noun

farmer (plural farmerek)

  1. blue jeans
Declension
Derived terms
  • farmernadrág

Polish

Etymology

From English farmer, from Middle English fermor, fermer, fermour, partly from Old French fermier, from Medieval Latin firmārius, from Latin firma; and partly from Old English feormere, from feormian.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfar.mɛr/

Noun

farmer m pers (feminine farmerka)

  1. (agriculture) farmer (person who works the land and/or who keeps livestock)
    Synonym: rolnik

Declension

Derived terms

  • (noun) farmerstwo
  • (adjective) farmerski

Further reading

  • farmer in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • farmer in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fârmer/
  • Hyphenation: far‧mer

Noun

fȁrmer m (Cyrillic spelling фа̏рмер)

  1. farmer

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English husbandman, husbondman, equivalent to husband +‎ -man.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhəzbəndmən/

Noun

husbandman (plural husbandmen)

  1. a person who raises crops and tends animals; a farmer
    • 1606 The xviii day of May in the fourth yeare of the Raigne of the kinge most excellent Monarche and in the year of our lord god 1606 I Thomas Knages of Lythe within the county of york husbandman sicke in body but whole in mynde and in perfect remembrance praised be to god do make and ordayne this my last will and testament in manner and forme following . . – The last will and testament of Thomas Knages (1533-1606)
    • 1684 Thomas Tusser, born at Riven-hall, was successively a Musician, School-master, Serving-man, and a Speculative Husbandman; – Anglorum Speculum: Or The Worthies of England, in Church and State – Thomas Fuller
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. XVII, The beginnings
      Valiant Wisdom tilling and draining; escorted by owl-eyed Pedantry, by owlish and vulturish and many other forms of Folly; — the valiant husbandman assiduously tilling; the blind greedy enemy too assiduously sowing tares!
    • 1844 The husbandman must labour before he receives the fruits – Works … – Jean Calvin

Related terms

  • husbandry

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial