fart vs wind what difference

what is difference between fart and wind

English

Etymology

From Middle English ferten, farten, from Old English feortan, from Proto-Germanic *fertaną, from Proto-Indo-European *perd-.

The noun is from Middle English fert, fart, from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: färt, IPA(key): /fɑːt/
  • (General American) enPR: färt, IPA(key): /fɑɹt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t

Verb

fart (third-person singular simple present farts, present participle farting, simple past and past participle farted)

  1. (informal, impolite, intransitive) To emit digestive gases from the anus; to flatulate.
    Synonyms: beef, blow off, break wind, cut one loose, cut the cheese, flatulate; see also Thesaurus:flatulate
  2. (colloquial, intransitive, usually as “fart around”) To waste time with idle and inconsequential tasks; to go about one’s activities in a lackadaisical manner; to be lazy or over-relaxed in one’s manner or bearing.
    Synonyms: futz, fool around, fool about
  3. (figuratively, transitive) To emit (fumes, gases, etc.).
    • 1988, Peter Carey, Oscar and Lucinda, London: Faber and Faber, 1989, Chapter 95, p. 457,[2]
      Above his head the funnel farted black soot into the sky.
    • 2014, Marlon James, A Brief History of Seven Killings, New York: Riverhead Books, p. 139,[3]
      We’ve been stuck behind a Ford Escort farting black smoke for ten minutes.

Usage notes

This term, although considered somewhat impolite, is not generally considered vulgar. It once was, and there still may be some that do consider it to be, so it is best avoided in polite discourse.

Translations

Noun

fart (plural farts)

  1. (informal) An emission of digestive gases from the anus; a flatus. [from 15th c.]
  2. (colloquial, impolite, derogatory) An irritating person; a fool.
  3. (colloquial, impolite, derogatory, potentially offensive) (usually as “old fart“) An elderly person; especially one perceived to hold old-fashioned views.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:flatus
  • Derived terms

    Translations

    See also

    Anagrams

    • FRTA, RTFA, TRAF, frat, raft, traf

    Catalan

    Etymology

    From Latin fartus.

    Pronunciation

    • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfaɾt/
    • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈfart/
    • Rhymes: -aɾt

    Adjective

    fart (feminine farta, masculine plural farts, feminine plural fartes)

    1. stuffed
    2. fed up

    Danish

    Etymology

    From Middle Low German vart, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz, cognate with Dutch vaart, German Fahrt, Old Norse ferð. Doublet of færd (journey),

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /farˀt/, [ˈfɑˀd̥]

    Noun

    fart c (singular definite farten, plural indefinite farter)

    1. (uncountable) speed
      Synonym: (non-technical contexts) hastighed
    2. (physics) speed (magnitude of velocity, if seen as a vector)
    3. (sailing) trip; journey; trade.

    Inflection

    Derived terms

    References

    • “fart” in Den Danske Ordbog

    French

    Etymology

    Probably from Norwegian fart (travel, velocity, speed), from Middle Low German vart, Old High German vart, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz. Related to German Fahrt (journey, ride).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /faʁ/

    Noun

    fart m (plural farts)

    1. wax (for skis)

    Further reading

    • “fart” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

    Hungarian

    Etymology

    far +‎ -t

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈfɒrt]
    • Hyphenation: fart

    Noun

    fart

    1. accusative singular of far

    Icelandic

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Danish fart.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /far̥t/
    • Rhymes: -ar̥t

    Noun

    fart f (genitive singular fartar, no plural)

    1. (informal) speed

    Declension


    Norwegian Bokmål

    Etymology 1

    From Middle Low German vart, related to fare (fare, travel).

    Noun

    fart m (definite singular farten, indefinite plural farter, definite plural fartene)

    1. velocity, speed
      Synonyms: hastighet, tempo
    2. movement, motion
      Synonyms: bevegelse, gang
    3. transportation
      Synonyms: ferdsel, reise, tur
    4. high speed, vigor, drive
      Synonyms: driv, fres, liv
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

    Verb

    fart

    1. past participle of fare

    References

    • “fart” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
    • “fart” in The Ordnett Dictionary

    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Etymology

    From Middle Low German vart.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /fɑrt/

    Noun

    fart m (definite singular farten, indefinite plural fartar, definite plural fartane)

    1. speed, velocity
    2. movement, motion
    3. transport, transportation, traffic

    Derived terms

    References

    • “fart” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

    Old High German

    Alternative forms

    • vart

    Etymology

    From Proto-West Germanic *fardi, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz, whence also Old English fierd, Old Norse ferð.

    Noun

    fart f

    1. trip
    2. ride

    Descendants

    • German: Fahrt

    Polish

    Etymology

    From German Fahrt, from Old High German vart, from Proto-West Germanic *fardi, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /fart/

    Noun

    fart m inan

    1. (colloquial) luck
      Synonym: szczęście
      Antonyms: niefart, pech
    2. (colloquial) fluke; stroke of luck
      Synonyms: fuks, łut szczęścia

    Declension

    Further reading

    • fart in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
    • fart in Polish dictionaries at PWN

    Swedish

    Etymology

    From Middle Low German vart, from Old Saxon fard. Cognate with Swedish färd, Dutch vaart, German Fahrt.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    fart c

    1. speed
      • 1917, Bible, Jeremiah 48:16:
        Snart kommer Moabs ofärd, och hans olycka hastar fram med fart.

        Soon comes Moab’s calamity, and his misery hastes with speed.

    Usage notes

    • As a suffix in certain compounds (listed separately below) this word takes on the meaning of “road”, “ramp” or “journey”, just like German Fahrt or Swedish färd, rather than the standalone meaning of speed. Similar compounds with the suffix -färd exist, with slightly different meaning.
    • In many compounds and in more formal or scientific use, speed translates to hastighet (velocity) rather than fart.

    Declension

    Derived terms

    Compounds with the meaning of road, ramp, or journey

    See also

    • fort
    • hastighet


    English

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English wynd, wind, from Old English wind (wind), from Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥tos (wind), from earlier *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (wind), derived from the present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow). Cognate with Dutch wind, German Wind, West Frisian wyn, Norwegian and Swedish vind, Icelandic vindur, Latin ventus, Welsh gwynt, Sanskrit वात (vā́ta), Russian ве́тер (véter), perhaps Albanian bundë (strong damp wind). Cognate to vent.

    Alternative forms

    • winde (obsolete)

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: wĭnd, IPA(key): /ˈwɪnd/
    • (archaic) enPR: wīnd, IPA(key): /ˈwaɪnd/
    • Rhymes: -ɪnd

    Noun

    wind (countable and uncountable, plural winds)

    1. (countable, uncountable) Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.
    2. Air artificially put in motion by any force or action.
    3. (countable, uncountable) The ability to breathe easily.
    4. News of an event, especially by hearsay or gossip. (Used with catch, often in the past tense.)
    5. One of the five basic elements in Indian and Japanese models of the Classical elements.
    6. (uncountable, colloquial) Flatus.
    7. Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.
      • Their instruments were various in their kind, / Some for the bow, and some for breathing wind.
    8. (music) The woodwind section of an orchestra. Occasionally also used to include the brass section.
    9. A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the “four winds”.
      • Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain.
    10. Types of playing-tile in the game of mah-jongg, named after the four winds.
    11. A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.
    12. Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.
    13. A bird, the dotterel.
    14. (boxing, slang) The region of the solar plexus, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury.
    Synonyms
    • (movement of air): breeze, draft, gale; see also Thesaurus:wind
    • (flatus): gas (US); see also Thesaurus:flatus
    Derived terms
    Descendants
    • Tok Pisin: win
    • Torres Strait Creole: win
    Translations

    See wind/translations § Etymology 1.

    See also

    Verb

    wind (third-person singular simple present winds, present participle winding, simple past and past participle winded or (proscribed) wound)

    1. (transitive) To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound.
    2. (transitive) To cause (someone) to become breathless, as by a blow to the abdomen, or by physical exertion, running, etc.
      The boxer was winded during round two.
    3. (transitive, Britain) To cause a baby to bring up wind by patting its back after being fed.
    4. (transitive, Britain) To turn a boat or ship around, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side.
    5. (transitive) To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.
    6. (transitive) To perceive or follow by scent.
      The hounds winded the game.
    7. (transitive) To rest (a horse, etc.) in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.
    8. (transitive) To turn a windmill so that its sails face into the wind.
    Usage notes
    • The form “wound” in the past is occasionally found in reference to blowing a horn, but is often considered to be erroneous. The October 1875 issue of The Galaxy disparaged this usage as a “very ridiculous mistake” arising from a misunderstanding of the word’s meaning.
    • A similar solecism occurs in the use (in this sense) of the pronunciation /waɪnd/, sometimes heard in singing and oral reading of verse, e.g., The huntsman /waɪndz/ his horn.
    Descendants
    • Tok Pisin: winim
    Translations

    See wind/translations § Etymology 1.

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English wynden, from Old English windan, from Proto-Germanic *windaną. Compare West Frisian wine, Low German winden, Dutch winden, German winden, Danish vinde, Walloon windea. See also the related term wend.

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: wīnd, IPA(key): /waɪnd/
    • Rhymes: -aɪnd
    • Homophones: wined, whined (in accents with the wine-whine merger)

    Verb

    wind (third-person singular simple present winds, present participle winding, simple past and past participle wound or winded)

    1. (transitive) To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something.
      • It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. He wore shepherd’s plaid trousers and the swallow-tail coat of the day, with a figured muslin cravat wound about his wide-spread collar.
    2. (transitive) To tighten the spring of a clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock.
    3. (transitive) To entwist; to enfold; to encircle.
    4. (intransitive) To travel in a way that is not straight.
      • 1751, Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
        The lowing herd wind slowly o’er the lea.
      • 1969, Paul McCartney, The Long and Winding Road
        The long and winding road / That leads to your door / Will never disappear.
    5. (transitive) To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one’s pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.
      • Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please / And wind all other witnesses.
      • 12 October 1710, Joseph Addison, The Examiner No. 5
        Were our legislature vested in the person of our prince, he might doubtless wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure.
    6. (transitive) To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.
      • 1674, Richard Allestree, The Government of the Tongue
        ‘Tis pleasant to see what little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse
    7. (transitive) To cover or surround with something coiled about.
    8. (transitive) To cause to move by exerting a winding force; to haul or hoist, as by a winch.
      • 2012, “Rural Affairs”, Anna Hutton-North, Lulu.com →ISBN [1]
    9. (transitive, nautical) To turn (a ship) around, end for end.
    Derived terms
    Related terms
    Descendants
    • Esperanto: vindi
    Translations

    See wind/translations § Etymology 2.

    Noun

    wind (plural winds)

    1. The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist.

    References

    • wind at OneLook Dictionary Search

    Afrikaans

    Etymology

    From Dutch wind, from Middle Dutch wint, from Old Dutch wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing), present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /vənt/

    Noun

    wind (plural winde, diminutive windjie)

    1. wind (movement of air)

    Alemannic German

    Alternative forms

    • wénn, winn, wend

    Etymology

    From Old High German wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz. Cognate with German Wind, Dutch wind, English wind, Icelandic vindur, Gothic ???????????????????? (winds).

    Noun

    wind m

    1. (Carcoforo) wind

    References

    • “wind” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

    Dutch

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ʋɪnt/
    • Hyphenation: wind
    • Rhymes: -ɪnt
    • Homophone: wint

    Etymology 1

    From Middle Dutch wint, from Old Dutch wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing), present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

    Noun

    wind m (plural winden, diminutive windje n)

    1. wind (movement of air)
    2. flatulence, fart
      Synonyms: bout, buikwind, ruft, scheet
    Derived terms
    Descendants
    • Afrikaans: wind
    • Berbice Creole Dutch: wende
    • Negerhollands: wind, win, wen
    • Skepi Creole Dutch: went
    • Sranan Tongo: winti

    Etymology 2

    From Middle Dutch wint. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

    Noun

    wind m (plural winden, diminutive windje n)

    1. (obsolete) greyhound
    Derived terms
    • windhond
    Related terms
    • hond

    Etymology 3

    See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

    Verb

    wind

    1. first-person singular present indicative of winden
    2. imperative of winden

    Middle English

    Etymology 1

    Noun

    wind

    1. Alternative form of wynd

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    wind

    1. Alternative form of wynden (to wind)

    Old English

    Etymology

    From Proto-West Germanic *wind.

    Germanic cognates include Old Frisian wind, Old Saxon wind, Dutch wind, Old High German wint (German Wind), Old Norse vindr (Swedish vind), Gothic ???????????????????? (winds). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin ventus (French vent), Welsh gwynt, Tocharian A want, Tocharian B yente.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /wind/

    Noun

    wind m

    1. wind
    2. flatulence

    Declension

    Derived terms

    Descendants

    • Middle English: wynd, wend, wende, wind, winde, wynde
      • English: wind
      • Scots: wind, win
      • Yola: wyeene, weend

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