fashion vs manner what difference

what is difference between fashion and manner

English

Alternative forms

  • fascion (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English facioun, from Anglo-Norman fechoun (compare Jersey Norman faichon), variant of Old French faceon, fazon, façon (fashion, form, make, outward appearance), from Latin factiō (a making), from faciō (do, make); see fact. Doublet of faction.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfæʃən/
  • Rhymes: -æʃən

Noun

fashion (countable and uncountable, plural fashions)

  1. (countable) A current (constantly changing) trend, favored for frivolous rather than practical, logical, or intellectual reasons.
  2. (uncountable) Popular trends.
    • the innocent diversions in fashion
    • 1879, Herbert Spencer, Principles of Sociology Part IV
      As now existing, fashion is a form of social regulation analogous to constitutional government as a form of political regulation.
  3. (countable) A style or manner in which something is done.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
  4. The make or form of anything; the style, shape, appearance, or mode of structure; pattern, model; workmanship; execution.
    • The fashion of his countenance was altered.
  5. (dated) Polite, fashionable, or genteel life; social position; good breeding.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Bislama: fasin
  • Bengali: ফ্যাশন (pphaśôn)
  • Burmese: ဖက်ရှင် (hpakhrang)
  • Hindi: फ़ैशन (faiśan)
  • Irish: faisean
  • Japanese: ファッション (fasshon)
  • Korean: 패션 (paesyeon)
  • Malay: fesyen
    • Indonesian: fesyen
  • Portuguese: fashion
  • Scottish Gaelic: fasan (perhaps)
  • Sotho: feshene
  • Spanish: fashion
  • Thai: แฟชั่น (fɛɛ-chân)
  • Urdu: فیشن(faiśan)
  • Welsh: ffasiwn

Translations

Verb

fashion (third-person singular simple present fashions, present participle fashioning, simple past and past participle fashioned)

  1. To make, build or construct, especially in a crude or improvised way.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter IX
      I have three gourds which I fill with water and take back to my cave against the long nights. I have fashioned a spear and a bow and arrow, that I may conserve my ammunition, which is running low.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist, translation by Lesley Brown, 235b:
      [] a device fashioned by arguments against that kind of prey.
  2. (dated) To make in a standard manner; to work.
    • Fashioned plate sells for more than its weight.
  3. (dated) To fit, adapt, or accommodate to.
    • Laws ought to be fashioned unto the manners and conditions of the people.
  4. (obsolete) To forge or counterfeit.

Derived terms

  • disfashion
  • misfashion
  • newfashion
  • refashion
  • fashioning needle
  • unfashioned

Translations

Further reading

  • fashion in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fashion in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English fashion. Doublet of facção and feição.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛ.ʃõ/

Adjective

fashion (invariable, comparable)

  1. (slang) fashionable, trendy

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fashion. Doublet of facción.

Adjective

fashion (invariable)

  1. fashionable, trendy

Derived terms

Noun

fashion m (plural fashions or fashion)

  1. fashion


English

Etymology

From Middle English maner, manere, from Anglo-Norman manere, from Old French maniere, from Vulgar Latin *manāria, from feminine of Latin manuarius (belonging to the hand), from manus (hand). Compare French manière, Italian mannaia (ax, axe), Portuguese maneira and maneiro (handy, portable), Romanian mâner (handle), and Spanish manera.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈmænə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmænɚ/
  • Hyphenation: man‧ner
  • Homophones: manor, manna

Noun

manner (plural manners)

  1. Mode of action; way of performing or doing anything
  2. Characteristic mode of acting or behaving; bearing
    • 1661, John Fell, The Life of the most learned, reverend and pious Dr. H. Hammond
      During the whole time of his abode in the university he generally spent thirteen hours of the day in study; by which assiduity besides an exact dispatch of the whole course of philosophy, he read over in a manner all classic authors that are extant []
  3. One’s customary method of acting; habit.
  4. good, polite behaviour
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, Vol. I, Ch. 4
      Harriet was not insensible of manner; she had voluntarily noticed her father’s gentleness with admiration as well as wonder. Mr. Martin looked as if he did not know what manner was.
  5. The style of writing or thought of an author; the characteristic peculiarity of an artist.
  6. A certain degree or measure.
  7. Sort; kind; style.
  8. Standards of conduct cultured and product of mind.

Synonyms

(mode of action): method; style; form; fashion; way

Derived terms

Translations


Estonian

Alternative forms

  • mander

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *manta. Cognate with Finnish manner, Ingrian mantere, and Ludian mander. Compare also Udmurt мудор (mudor, a mythical creature) and archaic Komi-Zyrian [script needed] (mudör, foundation).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑnːer/

Noun

manner (genitive mandri, partitive mandrit)

  1. continent
  2. mainland

Usage notes

The definition of manner in Estonian includes 6 continents: Africa (Aafrika), Antarctica (Antarktis), Australia (Austraalia), Eurasia (Euraasia), North America (Põhja-Ameerika), and South America (Lõuna-Ameerika).

Declension

See also

  • maailmajagu

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • mantere (not as common)

Etymology

Derived from Proto-Finnic *manta with +‎ -re, possibly from Proto-Finnic *maa, from Proto-Uralic *mëxe. Cognate to Estonian mander and Veps mandreh.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑnːer/, [ˈmɑnːe̞r]
  • Rhymes: -ɑnːer
  • Syllabification: man‧ner

Noun

manner

  1. mainland (main landmass of a country, continent or sometimes of a group of islands)
    Sen tytärkaupungit, jotka ovat mantereella, surmataan miekalla, ja he tulevat tietämään, että minä olen Herra. (Hesekiel 26:6, Raamattu, vuoden 1933 käännös)

    Also her daughters who are on the mainland will be slain by the sword, and they will know that I am the Lord. (Ezekiel 26:6, New American Standard Bible)
    Ahvenanmaan suurinta saarta kutsutaan usein mantereeksi.

    The largest island of Åland archipelago is often called mainland.
  2. (geology) continent
    Määritelmästä riippuen mantereita on neljä, viisi, kuusi tai seitsemän.

    Depending on definition there are four, five, six or seven continents.
  3. (as modifier in compound terms) continental (of or pertaining to a continent)

Declension

Derived terms

  • mannermainen
  • mannermaisesti
  • mannermaisuus
  • mannermaisesti
  • mantereinen
  • mantereisuus

Compounds

See also

  • maanosa
  • tanner
  • kinner
  • mantu

References

Itkonen, Erkki; Kulonen, Ulla-Maija, editors (1992–2000) Suomen sanojen alkuperä [The origin of Finnish words] (in Finnish), Helsinki: Institute for the Languages of Finland/Finnish Literature Society, →ISBN


Ingrian

Noun

manner

  1. continent

Luxembourgish

Adjective

manner

  1. comparative degree of mann

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