fashion vs mode what difference

what is difference between fashion and mode

English

Alternative forms

  • fascion (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English facioun, from Anglo-Norman fechoun (compare Jersey Norman faichon), variant of Old French faceon, fazon, façon (fashion, form, make, outward appearance), from Latin factiō (a making), from faciō (do, make); see fact. Doublet of faction.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfæʃən/
  • Rhymes: -æʃən

Noun

fashion (countable and uncountable, plural fashions)

  1. (countable) A current (constantly changing) trend, favored for frivolous rather than practical, logical, or intellectual reasons.
  2. (uncountable) Popular trends.
    • the innocent diversions in fashion
    • 1879, Herbert Spencer, Principles of Sociology Part IV
      As now existing, fashion is a form of social regulation analogous to constitutional government as a form of political regulation.
  3. (countable) A style or manner in which something is done.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
  4. The make or form of anything; the style, shape, appearance, or mode of structure; pattern, model; workmanship; execution.
    • The fashion of his countenance was altered.
  5. (dated) Polite, fashionable, or genteel life; social position; good breeding.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Bislama: fasin
  • Bengali: ফ্যাশন (pphaśôn)
  • Burmese: ဖက်ရှင် (hpakhrang)
  • Hindi: फ़ैशन (faiśan)
  • Irish: faisean
  • Japanese: ファッション (fasshon)
  • Korean: 패션 (paesyeon)
  • Malay: fesyen
    • Indonesian: fesyen
  • Portuguese: fashion
  • Scottish Gaelic: fasan (perhaps)
  • Sotho: feshene
  • Spanish: fashion
  • Thai: แฟชั่น (fɛɛ-chân)
  • Urdu: فیشن(faiśan)
  • Welsh: ffasiwn

Translations

Verb

fashion (third-person singular simple present fashions, present participle fashioning, simple past and past participle fashioned)

  1. To make, build or construct, especially in a crude or improvised way.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter IX
      I have three gourds which I fill with water and take back to my cave against the long nights. I have fashioned a spear and a bow and arrow, that I may conserve my ammunition, which is running low.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist, translation by Lesley Brown, 235b:
      [] a device fashioned by arguments against that kind of prey.
  2. (dated) To make in a standard manner; to work.
    • Fashioned plate sells for more than its weight.
  3. (dated) To fit, adapt, or accommodate to.
    • Laws ought to be fashioned unto the manners and conditions of the people.
  4. (obsolete) To forge or counterfeit.

Derived terms

  • disfashion
  • misfashion
  • newfashion
  • refashion
  • fashioning needle
  • unfashioned

Translations

Further reading

  • fashion in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fashion in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English fashion. Doublet of facção and feição.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɛ.ʃõ/

Adjective

fashion (invariable, comparable)

  1. (slang) fashionable, trendy

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fashion. Doublet of facción.

Adjective

fashion (invariable)

  1. fashionable, trendy

Derived terms

Noun

fashion m (plural fashions or fashion)

  1. fashion


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /məʊd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /moʊd/
  • Rhymes: -əʊd
  • Homophone: mowed

Etymology 1

From Old French mode (masculine), from Latin modus (measure, due measure, rhythm, melody). Doublet of modus.

Noun

mode (plural modes)

  1. (music) One of several ancient Greek scales.
  2. (music) One of several common scales in modern Western music, one of which corresponds to the modern major scale and one to the natural minor scale.
  3. A particular means of accomplishing something.
    • 1855, Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society (volume 9, page 205)
      An effectual and inexpensive mode of Protecting Wall-Trees from Spring-Frosts.
  4. A particular state of being, or frame of mind.
    After a series of early setbacks, her political campaign is in crisis mode.
  5. (statistics) The most frequently occurring value in a distribution
  6. (mathematics, physics) A state of a system that is represented by an eigenfunction of that system.
  7. (computing) One of various related sets of rules for processing data; more generally, any state of the system associated with certain behaviours.
    Hyponyms: emulation mode, immediate mode, local emulation mode, protected mode, real mode, retained mode, strict mode
  8. (electronics) A series of settings on a device used for a specific purpose.
  9. (video games) A variation in gameplay, such as a difficulty level.
  10. (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
    Synonyms: mood, grammatical mood
    Hyponyms: imperative mode, indicative mode, infinitive mode, subjunctive mode
  11. (philosophy) That which exists only as a quality of substance.
  12. (textiles) In lace-making, a small decorative piece inserted into a pattern.
  13. (textiles) The openwork between the solid parts of a pattern.
  14. (obsolete) A woman’s mantle with a hood.
Derived terms
  • (grammar): See also Thesaurus:grammatical mood
  • (music): Aeolian mode, Dorian mode, Ionian mode, Locrian mode, Lydian mode, Mixolydian mode, Phrygian mode
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From French mode (feminine).

Noun

mode (plural modes)

  1. Style or fashion; popular trend.
    Her wardrobe is always in mode.
    • 1922, Edith Van Dyne, Mary Louise and Josie O’Gorman (chapter 4)
      The dress she wore was no longer a cheap blue serge but a handsome tricolette, richly trimmed according to the prevailing mode.
Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • bimodal distribution
  • median
  • mean
  • modal

Anagrams

  • Dome, E.D. Mo., Edom, Medo-, demo, demo-, dome

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈmɔ.də/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈmɔ.de/

Noun

mode m (plural modes)

  1. modus
  2. way
  3. (grammar) mood

Danish

Etymology

From French mode, from Latin modus (manner, method).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moːdə/, [ˈmoːðə]

Noun

mode c (singular definite moden, plural indefinite moder)

  1. fashion

Inflection

Further reading

  • mode on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French mode, from Latin modus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmoː.də/
  • Hyphenation: mo‧de
  • Rhymes: -oːdə

Noun

mode f (plural modes, diminutive modetje n)

  1. fashion, trend
    Het staat je vrij om de mode te volgen in België en Nederland — You’re free to follow fashion in Belgium and the Netherlands.
  2. (obsolete) custom, tradition, manner

Derived terms

  • burgermode
  • damesmode
  • haarmode
  • herenmode
  • kindermode
  • modeartikel
  • modebewust
  • modeblad
  • modegek
  • modegril
  • modekleur
  • modekwaal
  • modemaakster
  • modemagazijn
  • modenaaister
  • modeontwerp
  • modeontwerper
  • modeplaat
  • modepop
  • modeshow
  • modesnufje
  • modetint
  • modetrend
  • modevak
  • modeverschijnsel
  • modewinkel
  • modewoord
  • modezaak
  • modezot
  • modezucht
  • modieus

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: mode
  • Indonesian: mode
  • West Frisian: moade

Anagrams

  • doem, moed

Esperanto

Etymology

From modo +‎ -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmode/
  • Hyphenation: mo‧de
  • Rhymes: -ode

Adverb

mode

  1. fashionably
    • 1937, British Esperantist:
    • 2002, Julian Modest, “La glita kaj danĝera vojo,” La Ondo de Esperanto:
    • 2003, Thierry Salomon, “La mondolingvo,” Monato:

Synonyms

  • laŭmode

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmode/, [ˈmo̞de̞]
  • Rhymes: -ode
  • Syllabification: mo‧de

Noun

mode

  1. (colloquial) Synonym of moderaattori.

Declension

Anagrams

  • Edmo, demo

French

Etymology

From Middle French mode, from Old French mode f, ultimately from Latin modus m. The masculine gender was reintroduced for some senses during the Middle French period under influence of the Latin. Doublet of mœuf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔd/

Noun

mode f (plural modes)

  1. fashion, trend

Derived terms

  • à la mode
  • défilé de mode
  • passé de mode
  • tripes à la mode de Caen

Descendants

Noun

mode m (plural modes)

  1. method, means, way, mode
  2. (grammar) mode, mood
    Synonym: mœuf
  3. (statistics) mode (most common value)

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • démo, dôme

Further reading

  • “mode” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Etymology

  • From Dutch mode f, from Middle French mode f, from Latin modus m. Doublet of model, modern, modul, and modus.
  • Semantic loan from English mode in electronics and computing sense.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmo.də]
  • Hyphenation: mo‧dê

Noun

modê (plural mode-mode, first-person possessive modeku, second-person possessive modemu, third-person possessive modenya)

  1. mode, style or fashion; popular trend.
    Synonym: fesyen
  2. mode,
    1. (electronics) a series of settings on a device used for a specific purpose.
    2. (computing) one of various related sets of rules for processing data.

Related terms

Further reading

  • “mode” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Italian

Noun

mode f

  1. plural of moda

Anagrams

  • demo, demo-, medo

Latin

Noun

mode

  1. vocative singular of modus

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • mod, mood, moode

Etymology 1

From Old English mōd, from Proto-Germanic *mōdaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moːd/
  • Rhymes: -oːd

Noun

mode (plural modes)

  1. Activity within one’s mind or brain:
    1. One’s current mindset or feelings; mood:
      1. Fortitude, braveness, bravery, heart.
      2. Vainness, proudness; the display of conceit.
      3. Sadness, lamenting; the state of being sad or upset.
      4. Angriness, ire, resentment.
    2. One’s mental capacity or intellect; the fount of reasoning.
    3. One’s overall or overarching feelings; an opinion or will.
    4. What one currently wants or likes; a goal or aim
    5. One’s motivation or willpower; resoluteness.
    6. (rare) Part of one’s thought process.
  2. A person’s nature or temperament; that which defines one’s behaviour.
  3. One’s visible nature; the appearance of someone.
  4. (rare) One’s actions as a whole; the way one behaves.
  5. (rare) Writing or speaking; communication.
  6. (rare) An enterprise or endeavour.
Related terms
  • drerimod
  • mody
  • modilich
  • modinesse
Descendants
  • English: mood
  • Scots: mude, muid
References
  • “mọ̄d, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-23.

Adjective

mode (rare)

  1. Vain, boastful, conceited.
  2. Upset, distressed.
References
  • “mọ̄de, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-23.

Etymology 2

From Old French mode, from Latin modus.

Alternative forms

  • mood, moode, moodd, moede

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔːd(ə)/, /ˈmoːd(ə)/

Noun

mode (plural modes) (Late Middle English)

  1. Grammatical mood or modality.
  2. (rare) Songs; pieces or sources of music.
References
  • “mōd(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-23.
Descendants
  • English: mode, mood

Norman

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

mode f (plural modes)

  1. (Jersey) fashion

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French mode (fashion, trend), from Middle French mode, from Old French mode, from Latin modus (measure, manner), from Proto-Italic *modōs, from Proto-Indo-European *mod-ōs (measure), from *med- (to measure). Doublet of mote.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔːd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːd
  • Hyphenation: mode

Adverb

mode

  1. Only used in à la mode (a la mode)
  2. Only used in a la mode (a la mode)

Anagrams

  • demo

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • modent

Adjective

mode

  1. neuter singular of moden

Pali

Alternative forms

Verb

mode

  1. inflection of modati (to rejoice):
    1. optative active singular
    2. first-person singular present/imperative middle

Swedish

Etymology

From French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²muːdɛ/

Noun

mode n

  1. fashion, a fashion trend

Declension

Related terms

  • höstmode
  • modelejon
  • modetidning
  • vårmode

See also

  • mod

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