father vs sire what difference

what is difference between father and sire

English

Etymology

From Middle English fader, from Old English fæder, from Proto-West Germanic *fader, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr. Doublet of ayr, faeder, padre, pater, and père.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: fä’thə(r), IPA(key): /ˈfɑːðə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) enPR: fä’thər, IPA(key): /ˈfɑðɚ/
  • (General Australian) enPR: fä’thə, IPA(key): /ˈfaːðə/
  • (obsolete) enPR: fă’thər, IPA(key): /ˈfæðəɹ/
  • Homophone: farther (in non-rhotic accents)
  • Rhymes: -ɑːðə(r)
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ther

Noun

father (plural fathers)

  1. A (generally human) male who begets a child.
  2. A male ancestor more remote than a parent; a progenitor; especially, a first ancestor.
  3. A term of respectful address for an elderly man.
  4. A term of respectful address for a priest.
  5. A person who plays the role of a father in some way.
  6. The founder of a discipline or science.
  7. Something that is the greatest or most significant of its kind.
    • 1991, The Nairobi Law Monthly:
      Soon after the announcement of this year’s election results, Mereka said that “the father of all battles had just begun.” His dispute with Muite goes back to March last year []
    • 2002, Financial Management:
      “If UK GDP slows by 1 per cent, there is the mother and father of all recessions. It was exciting, but very bizarre, working in such an environment.”
    • 2012, Zubairu Wai, Epistemologies of African Conflicts: Violence, Evolutionism, and the War in Sierra Leone, Palgrave Macmillan: (→ISBN), page 93:
      “The Father of All Battles”
      On March 23, 1991, a band of armed insurgents attacked the town of Bomaru []
  8. Something inanimate that begets.

Synonyms

  • (parent): see Thesaurus:father
  • (most significant thing): see mother and granddaddy

Antonyms

  • (with regards to gender) mother
  • (with regards to ancestry) son, daughter, child

Hypernyms

  • (a male parent): parent

Derived terms

Related terms

  • Father
  • Jupiter
  • paternal

Translations

Verb

father (third-person singular simple present fathers, present participle fathering, simple past and past participle fathered)

  1. To be a father to; to sire.
  2. (figuratively) To give rise to.
  3. To act as a father; to support and nurture.
  4. To provide with a father.
  5. To adopt as one’s own.
    • 1713, Jonathan Swift, Imitation of Horace, Book I. Ep. VII.
      Kept company with men of wit / Who often fathered what he writ.

Translations

See also

  • beget
  • grandpa
  • pater
  • paternal
  • sire

Anagrams

  • afther, fareth, hafter, trefah

Middle English

Noun

father

  1. (Late Middle English) Alternative form of fader


English

Etymology

From Middle English sire, from Old French sire, the nominative singular of seignor; from Latin senior, from senex. Doublet of senior, seigneur, seignior, sir, and monsieur.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saɪə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Noun

sire (plural sires)

  1. A lord, master, or other person in authority, most commonly used vocatively: formerly in speaking to elders and superiors, later only when addressing a sovereign.
  2. A male animal that has fathered a particular offspring (especially used of domestic animals and/or in biological research).
  3. (obsolete) A father; the head of a family; the husband.
  4. (obsolete) A creator; a maker; an author; an originator.

Coordinate terms

  • (male animal): dam

Translations

Verb

sire (third-person singular simple present sires, present participle siring, simple past and past participle sired)

  1. (transitive, of a male) to father; to beget.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 6:
      In these travels, my father sired thirteen children in all, four boys and nine girls.

Translations

Anagrams

  • EIRs, Eris, Iser, SIer, Seri, eirs, ires, reis, rise

Danish

Etymology

From German zieren.

Verb

sire

  1. (archaic) adorn
  2. (archaic, by extension, especially in the passive participle) endow with a favorable quality

Derived terms

  • vansire

References

  • “sire” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog

French

Etymology

From Old French sire (nominative form), from Vulgar Latin *seior (used as a term of address), a contracted form of Latin senior (compare French seigneur, derived from the accusative form), perhaps influenced by maior. Doublet of senior.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siʁ/
  • Rhymes: -iʁ
  • Homophones: cire, cirent, cires, sires

Noun

sire m (plural sires)

  1. (obsolete) sire (term of respect)
  2. (obsolete) lord

Derived terms

  • triste sire

Related terms

  • monsieur
  • seigneur

Further reading

  • “sire” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ries

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French sire. See also sere. Doublet of signore.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsi.re/

Noun

sire m (invariable)

  1. king, monarch (only when addressing a sovereign)
    Synonyms: re, sovrano, monarca, maestà

Anagrams

  • Eris, IRES, ersi, resi, rise, seri

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • sir, sirre, syre, syr, seere, ser, sure, sore

Etymology

From Old French sire, nominative singular of seignor, from Latin senior. Doublet of senyour.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsiːr(ə)/, /ˈsir(ə)/, /ˈsɛr(ə)/

Noun

sire (plural sires)

  1. Used preceding the name or title of a knight, noble, or cleric.
  2. A respectful term of address for a noble or gentleman.
  3. A noble or lord; one of high station.
  4. A husband as the head of a household.
  5. A father as one’s progenitor.

Descendants

  • English: sir; sire
  • Scots: sir; sire

References

  • “sī̆r(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsi.rə/

Noun

sire m

  1. nominative singular of sieur

Pali

Alternative forms

Noun

sire

  1. locative singular of siras

Romanian

Etymology

From French sire.

Noun

sire m (uncountable)

  1. sire

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Verb

sire (Cyrillic spelling сире)

  1. third-person plural present of siriti

Slovene

Noun

sire

  1. accusative plural of sir

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