fatigue vs pall what difference

what is difference between fatigue and pall

English

Etymology

From French fatigue, from fatiguer, from Latin fatīgāre (to weary, tire, vex, harass)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fəˈtiːɡ/
  • Rhymes: -iːɡ

Noun

fatigue (countable and uncountable, plural fatigues)

  1. A weariness caused by exertion; exhaustion.
  2. (often in the plural) A menial task or tasks, especially in the military.
  3. (engineering) Weakening and eventual failure of material, typically by cracking leading to complete separation, caused by repeated application of mechanical stress to the material.
    • 2013, N. Dowling, Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, page 399
      Mechanical failures due to fatigue have been the subject of engineering efforts for more than 150 years.

Synonyms

  • Thesaurus:fatigue

Derived terms

  • fatigues (military work clothing)
  • diversity fatigue
  • donor fatigue
  • fatigueless
  • fatigue duty

Translations

Verb

fatigue (third-person singular simple present fatigues, present participle fatiguing, simple past and past participle fatigued)

  1. (transitive) To tire or make weary by physical or mental exertion.
  2. (transitive, cooking) To wilt a salad by dressing or tossing it.
    • 1927, Dorothy L. Sayers, Unnatural Death, chapter 1
      The handsome, silver-haired proprietor was absorbed in fatiguing a salad for a family party.
  3. (intransitive) To lose so much strength or energy that one becomes tired, weary, feeble or exhausted.
  4. (intransitive, engineering, of a material specimen) To undergo the process of fatigue; to fail as a result of fatigue.
  5. (transitive, engineering) To cause to undergo the process of fatigue.

Related terms

  • fatigable
  • indefatigable

Translations

Further reading

  • fatigue in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fatigue in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fa.tiɡ/

Noun

fatigue f (plural fatigues)

  1. fatigue, weariness

Derived terms

  • tomber de fatigue

Related terms

  • fatigué
  • fatiguer

Further reading

  • “fatigue” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Verb

fatigue

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  3. third-person singular imperative of fatigar

Spanish

Verb

fatigue

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fatigar.


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pɔːl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /pɔl/, /pɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl
  • Homophone: Paul

Etymology 1

From Middle English pal, palle, from Old English pæl, pæll, from Old French paile and Latin pallium (cloak; covering) (and thus a doublet of pallium), probably from palla (piece of cloth worn as apparel) (possibly from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (to cover, wrap; hide, skin; cloth)) + -ium (suffix forming abstract nouns).

Noun

pall (plural palls)

  1. Senses relating to cloth.
    1. (archaic, poetic) Fine cloth, especially purple cloth used for robes.
    2. A heavy cloth laid over a coffin or tomb; a shroud laid over a corpse.
    3. (Christianity) A piece of cardboard, covered with linen and embroidered on one side, used to cover the chalice during the Eucharist.
    4. (Christianity, obsolete) A cloth used for various purposes on the altar in a church, such as a corporal (cloth on which elements of the Eucharist are placed) or frontal (drapery covering the front of an altar).
  2. Senses relating to clothing.
    1. (archaic) An outer garment; a cloak, mantle, or robe.
    2. (figuratively) Something that covers or surrounds like a cloak; in particular, a cloud of dust, smoke, etc., or a feeling of fear or gloom.
    3. (Christianity) Especially in Roman Catholicism: a pallium (liturgical vestment worn over the chasuble).
    4. (heraldry) A charge representing an archbishop’s pallium, having the form of the letter Y charged with crosses.
      Synonyms: cross-pall, pairle
Derived terms
Related terms
  • palliate
Translations

Etymology 2

From the noun pall (cloth).

Verb

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. (transitive) To cloak or cover with, or as if with, a pall.

Etymology 3

Formed by aphesis from appal, appall ((obsolete) to make pale; to weaken; to become weak; to lose flavour or become stale), possibly under the influence of the figurative meaning of the unrelated noun pall.

Alternatively, the word may be derived from Middle English pallen (to diminish, impair, weaken; to become faint; to lose spirit), formed by aphesis from apallen (to become or make faint or tired; to become indifferent; to fade or cause to fade away; to dim, weaken; to become stale; to be frightened; to frighten; to become pale), from Old French apalir (to become or cause to become pale), possibly from Latin pallidus (pale, pallid; pale with fright, frightened; mouldy, musty), from palleō (to be pale, turn pale; to be anxious or fearful; to fade or change colour) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pel-, *pelH- (grey; pale)) + -idus (suffix meaning ‘tending to’ forming adjectives).

Verb

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. (transitive) To make vapid or insipid; to make lifeless or spiritless; to dull, to weaken.
  2. (intransitive) To become dull, insipid, tasteless, or vapid; to lose life, spirit, strength, or taste.

Translations

Etymology 4

From the verb pall (to make vapid).

Noun

pall (plural palls)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A feeling of nausea caused by disgust or overindulgence.

References

Further reading

  • pall (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • LLAP, Llap

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *palei-, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pel- (to speak with a loud voice). Cognate to Gothic ???????????????????????????? (spillōn, to proclaim).

Verb

pall (first-person singular past tense palla, participle pallë/pallur)

  1. to cry, hee-haw

Related terms

  • pa
  • shpall
  • fjalë

References


Estonian

Etymology

From either German Ball or Middle Low German bal.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pˈɑlʲː/

Noun

pall (genitive palli, partitive palli)

  1. (sports) ball

Declension

Derived terms

  • jalgpall
  • korvpall

Livonian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finnic *palvodak. Cognates include Finnish palvoa and Estonian paluma.

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) pallõ

Verb

pall

  1. ask

Etymology 2

From Proto-Finnic *paladak.

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) pa’llõ

Verb

pall

  1. burn

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse pallr

Noun

pall m (definite singular pallen, indefinite plural paller, definite plural pallene)

  1. a pallet (portable platform on which goods are stacked for transport)
  2. a podium (especially for winners of a sporting event)

References

  • “pall” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse pallr

Noun

pall m (definite singular pallen, indefinite plural pallar, definite plural pallane)

  1. a pallet (portable platform on which goods are stacked for transport)
  2. a podium (especially for winners of a sporting event)

References

  • “pall” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

pall c

  1. a stool; a chair without armrests or a back
  2. (sports) a podium for prize ceremonies
  3. a pallet; a movable platform, constructed to be moved by forklifts
  4. a pawl (a pin in a ratchet gear)
    att stå pall

    to cope, to stand against pressure
  5. (dated, slang) an apple

Declension

Derived terms

  • fotpall
  • lastpall
  • mjölkpall
  • palla
  • pallbrytning
  • palldragare
  • pallning
  • pallplacering
  • pallplats
  • pallvagn
  • prispall
  • stå pall

References

  • pall in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Welsh

Noun

pall m (plural pallon)

  1. tent

Synonyms

  • lluest
  • lluesty
  • pabell

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse pallr, of uncertain origin.

Noun

pall m

  1. Floor in stall or box.

Derived terms

  • baspall
  • stallpall

See also

  • flåor
  • gólv

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