fatigue vs tire what difference

what is difference between fatigue and tire

English

Etymology

From French fatigue, from fatiguer, from Latin fatīgāre (to weary, tire, vex, harass)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fəˈtiːɡ/
  • Rhymes: -iːɡ

Noun

fatigue (countable and uncountable, plural fatigues)

  1. A weariness caused by exertion; exhaustion.
  2. (often in the plural) A menial task or tasks, especially in the military.
  3. (engineering) Weakening and eventual failure of material, typically by cracking leading to complete separation, caused by repeated application of mechanical stress to the material.
    • 2013, N. Dowling, Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, page 399
      Mechanical failures due to fatigue have been the subject of engineering efforts for more than 150 years.

Synonyms

  • Thesaurus:fatigue

Derived terms

  • fatigues (military work clothing)
  • diversity fatigue
  • donor fatigue
  • fatigueless
  • fatigue duty

Translations

Verb

fatigue (third-person singular simple present fatigues, present participle fatiguing, simple past and past participle fatigued)

  1. (transitive) To tire or make weary by physical or mental exertion.
  2. (transitive, cooking) To wilt a salad by dressing or tossing it.
    • 1927, Dorothy L. Sayers, Unnatural Death, chapter 1
      The handsome, silver-haired proprietor was absorbed in fatiguing a salad for a family party.
  3. (intransitive) To lose so much strength or energy that one becomes tired, weary, feeble or exhausted.
  4. (intransitive, engineering, of a material specimen) To undergo the process of fatigue; to fail as a result of fatigue.
  5. (transitive, engineering) To cause to undergo the process of fatigue.

Related terms

  • fatigable
  • indefatigable

Translations

Further reading

  • fatigue in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fatigue in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fa.tiɡ/

Noun

fatigue f (plural fatigues)

  1. fatigue, weariness

Derived terms

  • tomber de fatigue

Related terms

  • fatigué
  • fatiguer

Further reading

  • “fatigue” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Verb

fatigue

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  3. third-person singular imperative of fatigar

Spanish

Verb

fatigue

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fatigar.


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtaɪ̯ə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈtaɪ̯ɚ/, [ˈtʰaɪ̯ɚ]
    • (Southern American English, Appalachia) IPA(key): /ˈtɑːɚ/
    • (Midwestern US, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈtʌɪ̯ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: tyre

Etymology 1

From Middle English tiren, tirien, teorien, from Old English tȳrian, tēorian (to fail, cease, become weary, be tired, exhausted; tire, weary, exhaust), of uncertain origin. Possibly from Proto-West Germanic *teuʀōn (to cease), which is possibly from Proto-Indo-European *dewH- (to fail, be behind, lag). Compare Ancient Greek δεύομαι (deúomai, to lack), Sanskrit दोष (dóṣa, crime, fault, vice, deficiency).

Alternative forms

  • tyre (dialectal)

Verb

tire (third-person singular simple present tires, present participle tiring, simple past and past participle tired)

  1. (intransitive) To become sleepy or weary.
  2. (transitive) To make sleepy or weary.
  3. (intransitive) To become bored or impatient (with).
    I tire of this book.
  4. (transitive) To bore.
Synonyms
  • (make sleepy or weary): See Thesaurus:tire
  • (bore): See Thesaurus:cause boredom
Related terms
  • tiresome
Translations

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English tire (equipment) aphetic form of attire.

Alternative forms

  • (rubber covering on a wheel): tyre

Noun

tire (plural tires)

  1. (obsolete) Accoutrements, accessories.
    • 1705, John Philips, Blenheim
      the tire of war
  2. (obsolete) Dress, clothes, attire.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.vii:
      Ne spared they to strip her naked all. / Then when they had despoild her tire and call, / Such as she was, their eyes might her behold.
    • , New York Review of Books 2001, p.66:
      men like apes follow the fashions in tires, gestures, actions: if the king laugh, all laugh […].
  3. A covering for the head; a headdress.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 10, p. 144,[2]
      And on her head she wore a tyre of gold,
  4. (American spelling) Metal rim of a wheel, especially that of a railroad locomotive.
  5. (American spelling, Canadian spelling) The rubber covering on a wheel; a tyre.
  6. A child’s apron covering the upper part of the body, and tied with tape or cord; a pinafore. Also tier.
Usage notes
  • Tire is one of the few words where Canadian usage prefers the US spelling over the British spelling.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

tire (third-person singular simple present tires, present participle tiring, simple past and past participle tired)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To dress or adorn.
    • [Jezebel] painted her face, and tired her head.
Related terms
  • tiring-house
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English tire, from Old French tirer (to draw or pull), akin to English tear (to rend).

Alternative forms

  • tyre

Verb

tire (third-person singular simple present tires, present participle tiring, simple past and past participle tired)

  1. (obsolete) To seize, pull, and tear prey, as a hawk does.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis
      Even as an empty eagle, sharp by fast, / Tires with her beak on feathers, flesh, and bone.
    • ca. 1611, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, Act III, Sc. iv, ll. 94–97:
      I grieve myself / To think, when thou shalt be disedged by her / That now thou tirest on, how thy memory / Will then be pang’d by me.
    • Ye dregs of baseness, vultures amongst men, / That tire upon the hearts of generous spirits.
  2. (obsolete) To seize, rend, or tear something as prey; to be fixed upon, or engaged with, anything.
    • 1616, George Chapman, Iliad
      Thus made she her remove, / And left wrath tyring on her son.
    • c. 1605–1608, William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens
      Upon that were my thoughts tiring.

Etymology 4

Noun

tire (plural tires)

  1. A tier, row, or rank.

Further reading

  • tire in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • tire in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • REIT, Teri, iter, iter., reit, rite, tier, trie

Asturian

Verb

tire

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of tirar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of tirar

Azerbaijani

Etymology

From Russian тире (tire), ultimately from French tiret.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [tiˈre]
  • Hyphenation: ti‧re

Noun

tire (definite accusative tireni, plural tirelər)

  1. dash (punctuation mark)

Declension


French

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tiʁ/

Verb

tire

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tirer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of tirer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of tirer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of tirer
  5. second-person singular imperative of tirer

Etymology 2

From English.

Noun

tire m (plural tires)

  1. (Canada, Louisiana) tire, tyre (of a car, truck, etc)

Anagrams

  • trie, trié

Etymology 3

tire f (plural tires)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Derived terms

  • vol à la tire
  • voleur à la tire

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French tirer (shoot).

Verb

tire

  1. To shoot (hit with a bullet or arrow)

Hausa

Etymology

Borrowed from English tray.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tì.ré/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [tɪ̀.ré]

Noun

tìr̃ê m (possessed form tìr̃ên)

  1. tray

Portuguese

Verb

tire

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of tirar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of tirar
  3. first-person singular imperative of tirar
  4. third-person singular imperative of tirar

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtəiər/

Verb

tire (third-person singular present tires, present participle tirin, past tiret, past participle tiret)

  1. to tire

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtiɾe/, [ˈt̪i.ɾe]

Verb

tire

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of tirar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of tirar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of tirar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of tirar.

Turkish

Etymology

From French tiret.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ti.ɾe/

Noun

tire (definite accusative tireyi, plural tireler)

  1. “-” Hyphen-minus symbol, used as a hyphen, minus sign, and a dash.

Declension

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