fatigue vs weariness what difference

what is difference between fatigue and weariness

English

Etymology

From French fatigue, from fatiguer, from Latin fatīgāre (to weary, tire, vex, harass)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fəˈtiːɡ/
  • Rhymes: -iːɡ

Noun

fatigue (countable and uncountable, plural fatigues)

  1. A weariness caused by exertion; exhaustion.
  2. (often in the plural) A menial task or tasks, especially in the military.
  3. (engineering) Weakening and eventual failure of material, typically by cracking leading to complete separation, caused by repeated application of mechanical stress to the material.
    • 2013, N. Dowling, Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, page 399
      Mechanical failures due to fatigue have been the subject of engineering efforts for more than 150 years.

Synonyms

  • Thesaurus:fatigue

Derived terms

  • fatigues (military work clothing)
  • diversity fatigue
  • donor fatigue
  • fatigueless
  • fatigue duty

Translations

Verb

fatigue (third-person singular simple present fatigues, present participle fatiguing, simple past and past participle fatigued)

  1. (transitive) To tire or make weary by physical or mental exertion.
  2. (transitive, cooking) To wilt a salad by dressing or tossing it.
    • 1927, Dorothy L. Sayers, Unnatural Death, chapter 1
      The handsome, silver-haired proprietor was absorbed in fatiguing a salad for a family party.
  3. (intransitive) To lose so much strength or energy that one becomes tired, weary, feeble or exhausted.
  4. (intransitive, engineering, of a material specimen) To undergo the process of fatigue; to fail as a result of fatigue.
  5. (transitive, engineering) To cause to undergo the process of fatigue.

Related terms

  • fatigable
  • indefatigable

Translations

Further reading

  • fatigue in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fatigue in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fa.tiɡ/

Noun

fatigue f (plural fatigues)

  1. fatigue, weariness

Derived terms

  • tomber de fatigue

Related terms

  • fatigué
  • fatiguer

Further reading

  • “fatigue” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Verb

fatigue

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fatigar
  3. third-person singular imperative of fatigar

Spanish

Verb

fatigue

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fatigar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fatigar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English werynes, werinesse, from Old English wēriġness (weariness), equivalent to weary +‎ -ness.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈwɪəɹinɪs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈwɪɹinɪs/
  • Hyphenation: weari‧ness

Noun

weariness (usually uncountable, plural wearinesses)

  1. Exhaustion, fatigue or tiredness.
    • 1886-88, Richard F. Burton, The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night:
      Now when he had reached the King’s capital wherein was Alaeddin, he alighted at one of the Kháns; and, when he had rested from the weariness of wayfare, he donned his dress and went down to wander about the streets, where he never passed a group without hearing them prate about the pavilion and its grandeur and vaunt the beauty of Alaeddin and his lovesomeness, his liberality and generosity, his fine manners and his good morals.
  2. A lack of interest or excitement.

Synonyms

  • defatigation
  • fatigue

Translations


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