fatten vs plump what difference

what is difference between fatten and plump

English

Etymology

From fat +‎ -en.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfætən/

Verb

fatten (third-person singular simple present fattens, present participle fattening, simple past and past participle fattened)

  1. (transitive) To cause (a person or animal) to be fat or fatter.
    • 1582, Stephen Batman (translator), Batman vppon Bartholome his Booke De Proprietatibus Rerum, London: Thomas East, Book 6, Chapter 25, p. 82,[1]
      And if the mat[t]er be too little, the vertue of digestion fayleth, and the bodye is dryed, and if the matter and meate be moderate, the meats is well digested, and the bodye fattened, the heart comforted, kinde heate made more, the humors made temperate, & wit made cleere:
    • 1969, Margaret Atwood, The Edible Woman, Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 2010, Part 1, Chapter 4,[2]
      In that classroom full of oily potato-chip-fattened adolescents, she was everyone’s ideal of translucent perfume-advertisement femininity.
  2. (intransitive, of a person or animal) To become fat or fatter.
    Synonyms: gain weight, put on weight
    • 1774, Henry Home, Lord Kames, Sketches of the History of Man, Dublin: James Williams, Volume 1, Sketch 2, pp. 49-50,[3]
      The Laplanders, possessing a country where corn will not grow, make bread of the inner bark of trees; and Linneus reports, that swine there fatten on that food []
    • 1916, James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3,[4]
      His soul was fattening and congealing into a gross grease, plunging ever deeper in its dull fear into a sombre threatening dusk []
    • 1955, J. P. Donleavy, The Ginger Man, New York: Dell, 1965, Chapter 6, p. 43,[5]
      Mushrooms fatten in the warm September rain.
  3. (transitive) To make thick or thicker (something containing paper, often money).
    • 1920, Sinclair Lewis, Main Street, New York: Harcourt, Brace, Chapter 33, p. 401,[6]
      “You horrible old man, you’ve always tried to turn Erik into a slave, to fatten your pocketbook! []
    • 1995, Rohinton Mistry, A Fine Balance, London: Faber & Faber, 1997, Part 5, p. 241,[7]
      The news spread, about the bastard caterer who was toying with their religious sentiments, trampling on their beliefs, polluting their beings, all for the sake of fattening his miserable wallet.
    • 2000, Michael Chabon, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, New York: Random House, Part 3, Chapter 2, p. 177,[8]
      It was the impotence of the money, and of all the pent-up warlike fancies that had earned it, to do anything but elaborate the wardrobe and fatten the financial portfolios of the owners of Empire Comics that so frustrated and enraged him.
  4. (intransitive) To become thick or thicker.
    • 1929, Thomas Wolfe, Look Homeward, Angel, London: Heinemann, 1930, Part 2, Chapter 22,[9]
      A broad river of white paper rushed constantly up from the cylinder and leaped into a mangling chaos of machinery whence it emerged a second later, cut, printed, folded and stacked, sliding along a board with a hundred others in a fattening sheaf.
  5. (transitive) To make (soil) fertile and fruitful.
    Synonym: enrich
    to fatten land
    • 1612, Joseph Hall, Contemplations vpon the Principall Passages of the Holie Storie, London: Sa. Macham, Volume 1, Book 4, p. 333,[10]
      As the riuer of Nilus was to Egypt in steed of heauen to moisten and fatten the earth; so their confidence was more in it then in heauen;
    • 1850, Christina Rossetti, “A Testimony” in Goblin Market and Other Poems, London: Macmillan, 1862, p. 163,[11]
      The earth is fattened with our dead;
      She swallows more and doth not cease:
      Therefore her wine and oil increase
      And her sheaves are not numberèd;
  6. (intransitive) To become fertile and fruitful.
    • 1700, John Dryden (translator), “The First Book of Homer’s Ilias” in Fables Ancient and Modern, London: Jacob Tonson, p. 205,[12]
      These hostile Fields shall fatten with thy Blood.

Derived terms

  • fattener
  • fattening
  • fatten up
  • nonfattened
  • unfattenable
  • unfattened

Translations


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

fatten

  1. plural of fat


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plʌmp/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp

Etymology 1

From Middle English plump, plompe, a borrowing from Middle Dutch plomp or Middle Low German plump.

Adjective

plump (comparative plumper or more plump, superlative plumpest or most plump)

  1. Having a full and rounded shape; chubby, somewhat overweight.
    • 1651, Thomas Carew, To my friend G. N. from Wrest
      The god of wine did his plump clusters bring.
    • 2015, Anton Chekhov, The Life and Genius of Anton Chekhov: Letters, Diary, Reminiscences and Biography: Assorted Collection of Autobiographical Writings of the Renowned Russian Author and Playwright of Uncle Vanya, The Cherry Orchard, The Three Sisters and The Seagull, e-artnow (→ISBN)
      My ideal is to be idle and to love a plump girl.
  2. Fat.
  3. Sudden and without reservation; blunt; direct; downright.
    • 1898, George Saintsbury, A Short History of English Literature
      After the plump statement that the author was at Erceldoune and spake with Thomas.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:obese

Antonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:scrawny

Translations

Verb

plump (third-person singular simple present plumps, present participle plumping, simple past and past participle plumped)

  1. (intransitive) To grow plump; to swell out.
    Her cheeks have plumped.
  2. (transitive) To make plump; to fill (out) or support; often with up.
    to plump oysters or scallops by placing them in fresh or brackish water
    • to plump up the hollowness of their history with improbable miracles
  3. (transitive) To cast or let drop all at once, suddenly and heavily.
    to plump a stone into water
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
      Although Miss Pross, through her long association with a French family, might have known as much of their language as of her own, if she had had a mind, she had no mind in that direction [] So her manner of marketing was to plump a noun-substantive at the head of a shopkeeper without any introduction in the nature of an article []
  4. (intransitive) To give a plumper (kind of vote).
  5. (transitive) To give (a vote), as a plumper.
  6. (transitive with for) To favor or decide in favor of something.

Etymology 2

From Middle English plumpen, akin to Middle Dutch plompen, Middle Low German plumpen, German plumpfen.

Verb

plump (third-person singular simple present plumps, present participle plumping, simple past and past participle plumped)

  1. (intransitive) To drop or fall suddenly or heavily, all at once.
    • September 24, 1712, The Spectator No. 492, letter from a prude
      Dulcissa plumps into a chair.

Translations

Adverb

plump

  1. Directly; suddenly; perpendicularly.

Noun

plump (plural plumps)

  1. The sound of a sudden heavy fall.

Etymology 3

From Middle English plump.

Noun

plump (plural plumps)

  1. (obsolete) A knot or cluster; a group; a crowd.

References

  • plump in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plʊmp/

Adjective

plump (comparative plumper, superlative am plumpesten)

  1. crude, clumsy
  2. squat, stumpy

Declension

Further reading

  • “plump” in Duden online

Irish

Etymology

Onomatopoeic

Pronunciation

  • (Cois Fharraige) IPA(key): /pˠl̪ˠʊmˠpˠ/

Noun

plump f (genitive singular plumpa, nominative plural plumpanna)

  1. Cois Fharraige form of plimp

Declension

Derived terms

  • plumpaíl

Mutation

Further reading

  • “plump” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpʰlʉmp]

Adjective

plump

  1. big and awkward
  2. base, vulgar

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