fault vs mistake what difference

what is difference between fault and mistake

English

Etymology

From Middle English faute, faulte, from Anglo-Norman faute, Old French faute, from Vulgar Latin *fallita (shortcoming), feminine of *fallitus, in place of Latin falsus, perfect passive participle of fallō (deceive). Displaced native Middle English schuld, schuild (fault) (from Old English scyld (fault)), Middle English lac (fault, lack) (from Middle Dutch lak (lack, fault)), Middle English last (fault, vice) (from Old Norse lǫstr (fault, vice, crime)). Compare French faute (fault, foul), Portuguese falta (lack, shortage) and Spanish falta (lack, absence). More at fail, false.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːlt/, /fɒlt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /fɔlt/
  • (cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /fɑlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːlt

Noun

fault (plural faults)

  1. A defect; something that detracts from perfection.
  2. A mistake or error.
  3. A weakness of character; a failing.
  4. A minor offense.
  5. Blame; the responsibility for a mistake.
  6. (seismology) A fracture in a rock formation causing a discontinuity.
  7. (mining) In coal seams, coal rendered worthless by impurities in the seam.
  8. (tennis) An illegal serve.
  9. (electrical) An abnormal connection in a circuit.
  10. (obsolete) want; lack
  11. (hunting) A lost scent; act of losing the scent.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:defect

Hyponyms

(seismology):

  • normal fault
  • reverse fault
  • strike-slip fault
  • thrust fault
  • transform fault

Derived terms

Related terms

  • default

Translations

Verb

fault (third-person singular simple present faults, present participle faulting, simple past and past participle faulted)

  1. (transitive) To criticize, blame or find fault with something or someone.
    • a. 1723, unknown author, The Devonshire Nymph
      For that, says he, I ne’er will fault thee / But for humbleness exalt thee.
  2. (intransitive, geology) To fracture.
  3. (intransitive) To commit a mistake or error.
  4. (intransitive, computing) To undergo a page fault.
    • 2002, Æleen Frisch, Essential system administration
      When a page is read in, a few pages surrounding the faulted page are typically loaded as well in the same I/O operation in an effort to head off future page faults.

Translations

References


French

Verb

fault

  1. Obsolete spelling of faut (third-person singular present indicative of falloir)

German

Verb

fault

  1. inflection of faulen:
    1. second-person plural present
    2. third-person singular present
    3. plural imperative


English

Etymology

From Middle English mistaken, from Old Norse mistaka (to take in error, to miscarry); equivalent to mis- +‎ take. Cognate with Icelandic mistaka (to mistake), Swedish missta (to mistake) (before apocope misstaga). Displaced Middle English misnimen and Middle English misfōn from Old English misfōn (and noun misfeng).

The noun, which replaced earlier mistaking, is derived from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɪˈsteɪk/
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Verb

mistake (third-person singular simple present mistakes, present participle mistaking, simple past mistook, past participle mistaken)

  1. (transitive) To understand wrongly, taking one thing or person for another.
    • 1777, Samuel Johnson, “Life of the Author” in The Works of Richard Savage with an Account of the Life and Writings of the Author, London: T. Evans, Volume I, p. lxi,[1]
      The reigning error of his life was, that he mistook the love for the practice of virtue, and was indeed not so much a good man, as the friend of goodness.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To misunderstand (someone).
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To commit an unintentional error; to do or think something wrong.
    • 1720, Jonathan Swift, “Letter to a Young Clergyman” in The Works of Jonathan Swift, London: Charles Elliot, 1784, Volume 10, pp. 6-7,[2]
      No gentleman thinks it is safe or prudent to send a servant with a message, without repeating it more than once, and endeavouring to put it into terms brought down to the capacity of the bearer; yet, after all this care, it is frequent for servants to mistake, and sometimes occasion misunderstandings among friends []
  4. (obsolete, rare) To take or choose wrongly.
    • 1716, Alexander Pope (translator), The Iliad of Homer, London: Bernard Lintott, Volume 2, Book 8, lines 151-152, p. 252,[3]
      The Spear with erring Haste mistook its way,
      But plung’d in Eniopeus’ Bosom lay.

Translations

Related terms

  • mistaken

Noun

mistake (plural mistakes)

  1. An error; a blunder.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:error
    • 1877, Henry Heth, quoting Robert E. Lee, in “Causes of the Defeat of Gen. Lee’s Army at the Battle of GettysburgOpinions of Leading Confederate Soldiers.”, Southern Historical Society Papers (1877), editor Rev. J. WM. Jones [4]
      After it is all over, as stupid a fellow as I am can see that mistakes were made. I notice, however, that my mistakes are never told me until it is too late.
  2. (baseball) A pitch which was intended to be pitched in a hard-to-hit location, but instead ends up in an easy-to-hit place.

Usage notes

  • Usually make a mistake. See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take]

Derived terms

  • mistakeless
  • make no mistake
  • spelling mistake

Translations

Anagrams

  • ketmias, makes it

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English mistake.

Noun

mistake m (plural mistakes)

  1. (Louisiana, Cajun French) error, mistake

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial