favor vs prefer what difference

what is difference between favor and prefer

English

Alternative forms

  • favour (Commonwealth, Ireland)

Etymology

From Middle English favour, favor, faver, from Anglo-Norman favour, from mainland Old French favor, from Latin favor (good will; kindness; partiality), from faveō (to be kind to). Respelled in American English to more closely match its Latin etymon. Compare also Danish favør (favor), Irish fabhar (favor), from the same Romance source.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪvɚ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfeɪvə/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun

favor (countable and uncountable, plural favors) (American spelling, alternative in Canada)

  1. A kind or helpful deed; an instance of voluntarily assisting (someone).
  2. Goodwill; benevolent regard.
  3. A small gift; a party favor.
    A marriage favour is a bunch or knot of white ribbons or white flowers worn at a wedding.
    • ca. 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act IV, sc. 7:
      Here, Fluellen; wear thou this favour for me and
      stick it in thy cap: when Alencon and myself were
      down together, I plucked this glove from his helm []
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackery, Vanity Fair, Chapter 22:
      The rain drove into the bride and bridegroom’s faces as they passed to the chariot. The postilions’ favours draggled on their dripping jackets.
  4. Mildness or mitigation of punishment; lenity.
    • I could not discover the lenity and favour of this sentence.
  5. The object of regard; person or thing favoured.
  6. (obsolete) Appearance; look; countenance; face.
  7. (law) Partiality; bias.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bouvier to this entry?)
  8. (archaic) A letter, a written communication.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, Letter 68:
      I will now take some notice of your last favour; but being so far behind-hand with you, must be brief.
  9. (obsolete) Anything worn publicly as a pledge of a woman’s favor.
  10. (obsolete, in the plural) Lovelocks.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)

Usage notes

  • Favor is the standard US spelling, and an alternative in Canada. Favour is the standard spelling in Canada and outside North America.
  • English speakers usually “do someone a favor” (rather than *”make them a favor”, which would be sense 3 only). See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for uses and meaning of favor collocated with these words.

Antonyms

  • disfavor
  • discriminate
  • discrimination
  • harm
  • sabotage
  • unfavor

Synonyms

  • aid
  • help
  • lend a hand
  • token

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

favor (third-person singular simple present favors, present participle favoring, simple past and past participle favored) (US, alternative in Canada, transitive)

  1. To look upon fondly; to prefer.
    • 1611, Luke 1:28, King James version
      And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, thou that art highly favored, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.
    • 2007, Bert Casper, Shadow Upon the Dream: Book 1: Barrûn, page 537:
      [] alone, without having to favor his right, uninjured leg, []
  2. To encourage, conduce to
  3. To do a favor [noun sense 1] for; to show beneficence toward.
  4. To treat with care.
  5. (in dialects, including Southern US and Louisiana) To resemble; especially, to look like (another person).
    • 1970, Donald Harington, Lightning Bug:
      ‘Mandy?’ he said, and stared at the girl. ‘Don’t favor her too much.’ ‘Favors her dad,’ Latha said, and looked at him.
    • 1989, Rayford Clayton Reddell, ‎Robert Galyean, Growing Fragrant Plants (page 13)
      [] chamomile and apples? Those particular smellalikes tested our imagination. Yet much of what he said was right on the mark. The scent of sweet peas, for instance, does indeed favor that of wisteria.

Synonyms

  • abet
  • assist
  • endorse
  • favoritize (rare, proscribed)
  • favourite
  • sanction

Antonyms

  • disfavor
  • discriminate

Derived terms

Translations


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin favor, attested from the 14th century.

Pronunciation

Noun

favor m or f (plural favors)

  1. favour

Derived terms

  • a favor de
  • afavorir
  • en favor de
  • per favor

References

Further reading

  • “favor” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “favor” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “favor” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese favor.

Noun

favor

  1. favour
  2. pleasure

Latin

Etymology

From faveō (I am well disposed or inclined toward, favor, countenance, befriend).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfa.u̯or/, [ˈfäu̯ɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfa.vor/, [ˈfɑːvɔr]

Noun

favor m (genitive favōris); third declension

  1. good will, inclination, partiality, favor
  2. support

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • favor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • favor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • favor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • favor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • favor in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Norn

Alternative forms

  • fa vor (rare)

Etymology

From Old Norse faðir (father) + vár (our), from Proto-Germanic *fadēr + *unseraz, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr. Compare Shetlandic fy vor.

Noun

favor

  1. (Orkney) our father

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin favor.

Pronunciation

Noun

favor f (plural favors)

  1. favor

Derived terms

  • favorable
  • favorir
  • favorisar
  • favorit
  • favoritisme
  • favorablament
  • afavorir
  • en favor de
  • a favor de
  • per favor
  • faire una favor
  • dar les favors

Antonyms

  • desfavor

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin favor (favour; good will), from faveō (I favour), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰoweh₁ (to notice).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /fɐ.ˈvoɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /fa.ˈvoʁ/, [fɐ.ˈvoχ]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun

favor m (plural favores)

  1. favour (instance of voluntarily assisting someone)
  2. favour; goodwill (benevolent regard)
    Synonyms: (obsolete) favorança, graça, mercê

Derived terms

  • a favor de
  • em favor de
  • fazer o favor de
  • por favor

Related terms

Adverb

favor (not comparable)

  1. (before a verb in the infinitive) please (seen on warnings and the like)

Romanian

Noun

favor n (plural favoruri)

  1. Alternative form of favoare

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin favor (genitive singular favōris).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈboɾ/, [faˈβ̞oɾ]
  • Hyphenation: fa‧vor

Noun

favor m (plural favores)

  1. favor/favour

Derived terms

Related terms

  • favorable
  • favorecer
  • favoritismo
  • favorito

Venetian

Etymology

Compare Italian favore

Noun

favor m (plural favuri)

  1. favour


English

Alternative forms

  • præfer [16th-17th c.]
  • preferre [14th-17th c.]

Etymology

From Middle English preferren, from Anglo-Norman preferer and Old French preferer, from Latin praeferō, praeferre. Displaced native Middle English foresettan and foreberan.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /pɹɪˈfɝ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pɹɪˈfɜː/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)

Verb

prefer (third-person singular simple present prefers, present participle preferring, simple past and past participle preferred)

  1. (transitive) To be in the habit of choosing something rather than something else; to favor; to like better. [from 14thc.]
    I’d prefer it if you didn’t do it.
    • “My tastes,” he said, still smiling, “incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet.” And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: “I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I’d rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don’t like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects; [].”
  2. (transitive, now dated) To advance, promote (someone or something). [from 14thc.]
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, p. 67,[1]
      [] she was one of my Master’s Captives. For this Reason, I presume, it was, that she took so much Compassion upon me; considering herself a Slave in a strange Country, and only preferr’d to my Master’s Bed by Courtesy.
  3. (transitive) To present or submit (something) to an authority (now usually in “to prefer charges”). [from 16thc.]
    • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, Letter 5, p. 137,[2]
      At length the Maroons, who were delighted to have him with them, became discontented with his absence, and for several years, during the sessions of the House of Assembly, preferred repeated complaints against him.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To put forward for acceptance; to introduce, recommend (to). [16th-19thc.]
    • 1630, John Smith, The True Travels, Adventures, and Observations of Captaine Iohn Smith, London: Thomas Slater, Chapter 1, p. 2,[3]
      one Master David Hume, who making some use of his purse, gave him Letters to his friends in Scotland to preferre him to King Iames.
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, Volume One, Chapter 17,[4]
      Such were the arguments which my will boldly preferred to my conscience, as coin which ought to be current, and which conscience, like a grumbling shopkeeper, was contented to accept [].

Usage notes

  • The verb can be used in three different forms:
    1. prefer + noun + to (or over) + noun. Example: I prefer coffee to tea.
    2. prefer + gerund + to (or over) + gerund. Example: I prefer skiing to swimming.
    3. prefer + full infinitive + rather than + bare infinitive. Example: I prefer to die honorably rather than live in shame. If the second verb is the same as the first, it can be elided: I prefer to eat fish rather than meat.

Inflection

Synonyms

  • forechoose

Antonyms

  • disprefer

Related terms

  • nonpreferred
  • preferable / preferrable
  • preference
  • preferendum
  • preferential
  • preferer / preferrer
  • preferment
  • preferred creditor, preferred provider, preferred stock, preferred stockholder
  • unpreferred
  • prelate

Translations


Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [preˈfer]

Verb

prefer

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of prefera

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